HudsonAlpha Genome Sequencing Center

Huntsville, AL, United States

HudsonAlpha Genome Sequencing Center

Huntsville, AL, United States
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Hossain M.S.,University of Missouri | Kawakatsu T.,Salk Institute for Biological Studies | Kawakatsu T.,Japan National Agriculture and Food Research Organization | Kim K.D.,University of Georgia | And 12 more authors.
New Phytologist | Year: 2017

Chromatin modifications, such as cytosine methylation of DNA, play a significant role in mediating gene expression in plants, which affects growth, development, and cell differentiation. As root hairs are single-cell extensions of the root epidermis and the primary organs for water uptake and nutrients, we sought to use root hairs as a single-cell model system to measure the impact of environmental stress. We measured changes in cytosine DNA methylation in single-cell root hairs as compared with multicellular stripped roots, as well as in response to heat stress. Differentially methylated regions (DMRs) in each methylation context showed very distinct methylation patterns between cell types and in response to heat stress. Intriguingly, at normal temperature, root hairs were more hypermethylated than were stripped roots. However, in response to heat stress, both root hairs and stripped roots showed hypomethylation in each context, especially in the CHH context. Moreover, expression analysis of mRNA from similar tissues and treatments identified some associations between DMRs, genes and transposons. Taken together, the data indicate that changes in DNA methylation are directly or indirectly associated with expression of genes and transposons within the context of either specific tissues/cells or stress (heat). © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust


Smith D.R.,University of British Columbia | Burki F.,University of British Columbia | Yamada T.,Hiroshima University | Grimwood J.,HudsonAlpha Genome Sequencing Center | And 2 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2011

Most of the available mitochondrial and plastid genome sequences are biased towards adenine and thymine (AT) over guanine and cytosine (GC). Examples of GC-rich organelle DNAs are limited to a small but eclectic list of species, including certain green algae. Here, to gain insight in the evolution of organelle nucleotide landscape, we present the GC-rich mitochondrial and plastid DNAs from the trebouxiophyte green alga Coccomyxa sp. C-169. We compare these sequences with other GC-rich organelle DNAs and argue that the forces biasing them towards G and C are nonadaptive and linked to the metabolic and/or life history features of this species. The Coccomyxa organelle genomes are also used for phylogenetic analyses, which highlight the complexities in trying to resolve the interrelationships among the core chlorophyte green algae, but ultimately favour a sister relationship between the Ulvophyceae and Chlorophyceae, with the Trebouxiophyceae branching at the base of the chlorophyte crown. © 2011 Smith et al.


Fiedler J.D.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Lanzatella C.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Okada M.,University of California at Davis | Jenkins J.,HudsonAlpha Genome Sequencing Center | And 4 more authors.
Plant Genome | Year: 2015

Switch grass (Panicum virgatum L.) is a warm-season perennial grass with promising potential as a bio energy crop in the United States. However, the lack of genomic resources has slowed the development of plant lines with optimal characteristics for sustainable feedstock production. We generated high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) linkage maps using a reduced representation sequencing approach by genotyping 231 F1 progeny of a cross between two parents of lowland ecotype from the cultivars Kanlow and Alamo. Over 350 million reads were generated and aligned, which enabled identification and ordering of 4611 high-quality SNPs. The total lengths of the resulting framework maps were 1770 cM for the Kanlow parent and 2059 cM for the Alamo parent. These maps show collinearity with maps generated with polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based simple-sequence repeat (SSR) markers, and new SNP markers were identified in previously unpopulated regions of the genome. Transmission segregation distortion affected all linkage groups (LGs) to differing degrees, and ordering of distorted markers highlighted several regions of unequal inheritance. Framework maps were adversely affected by the addition of distorted markers with varying severity, but distorted maps were of higher marker density and provided additional information for analysis. Alignment of these linkage maps with a draft version of the switchgrass genome assembly demonstrated high levels of collinearity and provides greater confidence in the validity of both resources. This methodology has proven to be a rapid and cost-effective way to generate high-quality linkage maps of an outcrossing species. © Crop Science Society of America


Zhang J.-Y.,Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation | Zhang J.-Y.,Oak Ridge National Laboratory | Lee Y.-C.,Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation | Lee Y.-C.,Oak Ridge National Laboratory | And 36 more authors.
Plant Journal | Year: 2013

Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is a perennial C4 grass with the potential to become a major bioenergy crop. To help realize this potential, a set of RNA-based resources were developed. Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were generated from two tetraploid switchgrass genotypes, Alamo AP13 and Summer VS16. Over 11.5 million high-quality ESTs were generated with 454 sequencing technology, and an additional 169 079 Sanger sequences were obtained from the 5′ and 3′ ends of 93 312 clones from normalized, full-length-enriched cDNA libraries. AP13 and VS16 ESTs were assembled into 77 854 and 30 524 unique transcripts (unitranscripts), respectively, using the Newbler and pave programs. Published Sanger-ESTs (544 225) from Alamo, Kanlow, and 15 other cultivars were integrated with the AP13 and VS16 assemblies to create a universal switchgrass gene index (PviUT1.2) with 128 058 unitranscripts, which were annotated for function. An Affymetrix cDNA microarray chip (Pvi-cDNAa520831) containing 122 973 probe sets was designed from PviUT1.2 sequences, and used to develop a Gene Expression Atlas for switchgrass (PviGEA). The PviGEA contains quantitative transcript data for all major organ systems of switchgrass throughout development. We developed a web server that enables flexible, multifaceted analyses of PviGEA transcript data. The PviGEA was used to identify representatives of all known genes in the phenylpropanoid-monolignol biosynthesis pathway. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.


Blaby I.K.,University of California at Los Angeles | Blaby-Haas C.E.,University of California at Los Angeles | Tourasse N.,French National Center for Scientific Research | Hom E.F.Y.,Harvard University | And 18 more authors.
Trends in Plant Science | Year: 2014

The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a popular unicellular organism for studying photosynthesis, cilia biogenesis, and micronutrient homeostasis. Ten years since its genome project was initiated an iterative process of improvements to the genome and gene predictions has propelled this organism to the forefront of the omics era. Housed at Phytozome, the plant genomics portal of the Joint Genome Institute (JGI), the most up-to-date genomic data include a genome arranged on chromosomes and high-quality gene models with alternative splice forms supported by an abundance of whole transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) data. We present here the past, present, and future of Chlamydomonas genomics. Specifically, we detail progress on genome assembly and gene model refinement, discuss resources for gene annotations, functional predictions, and locus ID mapping between versions and, importantly, outline a standardized framework for naming genes. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.


PubMed | University of Minnesota, University of Washington, University of Connecticut Health Center, University of Massachusetts Medical School and 10 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Trends in plant science | Year: 2014

The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a popular unicellular organism for studying photosynthesis, cilia biogenesis, and micronutrient homeostasis. Ten years since its genome project was initiated an iterative process of improvements to the genome and gene predictions has propelled this organism to the forefront of the omics era. Housed at Phytozome, the plant genomics portal of the Joint Genome Institute (JGI), the most up-to-date genomic data include a genome arranged on chromosomes and high-quality gene models with alternative splice forms supported by an abundance of whole transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) data. We present here the past, present, and future of Chlamydomonas genomics. Specifically, we detail progress on genome assembly and gene model refinement, discuss resources for gene annotations, functional predictions, and locus ID mapping between versions and, importantly, outline a standardized framework for naming genes.


Jackson S.A.,University of Georgia | Iwata A.,University of Georgia | Lee S.-H.,Seoul National University | Schmutz J.,HudsonAlpha Genome Sequencing Center | Shoemaker R.,U.S. Department of Agriculture
New Phytologist | Year: 2011

Many challenges face plant scientists, in particular those working on crop production, such as a projected increase in population, decrease in water and arable land, changes in weather patterns and predictability. Advances in genome sequencing and resequencing can and should play a role in our response to meeting these challenges. However, several barriers prevent rapid and effective deployment of these tools to a wide variety of crops. Because of the complexity of crop genomes, de novo sequencing with next-generation sequencing technologies is a process fraught with difficulties that then create roadblocks to the utilization of these genome sequences for crop improvement. Collecting rapid and accurate phenotypes in crop plants is a hindrance to integrating genomics with crop improvement, and advances in informatics are needed to put these tools in the hands of the scientists on the ground. © 2011 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2011 New Phytologist Trust.


Serano J.M.,University of California at Berkeley | Martin A.,University of California at Berkeley | Liubicich D.M.,University of California at Berkeley | Jarvis E.,University of California at Berkeley | And 5 more authors.
Developmental Biology | Year: 2015

Hox genes play crucial roles in establishing regional identity along the anterior-posterior axis in bilaterian animals, and have been implicated in generating morphological diversity throughout evolution. Here we report the identification, expression, and initial genomic characterization of the complete set of Hox genes from the amphipod crustacean Parhyale hawaiensis. Parhyale is an emerging model system that is amenable to experimental manipulations and evolutionary comparisons among the arthropods. Our analyses indicate that the Parhyale genome contains a single copy of each canonical Hox gene with the exception of fushi tarazu, and preliminary mapping suggests that at least some of these genes are clustered together in the genome. With few exceptions, Parhyale Hox genes exhibit both temporal and spatial colinearity, and expression boundaries correlate with morphological differences between segments and their associated appendages. This work represents the most comprehensive analysis of Hox gene expression in a crustacean to date, and provides a foundation for functional studies aimed at elucidating the role of Hox genes in arthropod development and evolution. © 2015.


PubMed | HudsonAlpha Genome Sequencing Center, University of California at Berkeley and University of Miami
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Developmental biology | Year: 2015

Hox genes play crucial roles in establishing regional identity along the anterior-posterior axis in bilaterian animals, and have been implicated in generating morphological diversity throughout evolution. Here we report the identification, expression, and initial genomic characterization of the complete set of Hox genes from the amphipod crustacean Parhyale hawaiensis. Parhyale is an emerging model system that is amenable to experimental manipulations and evolutionary comparisons among the arthropods. Our analyses indicate that the Parhyale genome contains a single copy of each canonical Hox gene with the exception of fushi tarazu, and preliminary mapping suggests that at least some of these genes are clustered together in the genome. With few exceptions, Parhyale Hox genes exhibit both temporal and spatial colinearity, and expression boundaries correlate with morphological differences between segments and their associated appendages. This work represents the most comprehensive analysis of Hox gene expression in a crustacean to date, and provides a foundation for functional studies aimed at elucidating the role of Hox genes in arthropod development and evolution.


PubMed | HudsonAlpha Genome Sequencing Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Nature | Year: 2010

Soybean (Glycine max) is one of the most important crop plants for seed protein and oil content, and for its capacity to fix atmospheric nitrogen through symbioses with soil-borne microorganisms. We sequenced the 1.1-gigabase genome by a whole-genome shotgun approach and integrated it with physical and high-density genetic maps to create a chromosome-scale draft sequence assembly. We predict 46,430 protein-coding genes, 70% more than Arabidopsis and similar to the poplar genome which, like soybean, is an ancient polyploid (palaeopolyploid). About 78% of the predicted genes occur in chromosome ends, which comprise less than one-half of the genome but account for nearly all of the genetic recombination. Genome duplications occurred at approximately 59 and 13 million years ago, resulting in a highly duplicated genome with nearly 75% of the genes present in multiple copies. The two duplication events were followed by gene diversification and loss, and numerous chromosome rearrangements. An accurate soybean genome sequence will facilitate the identification of the genetic basis of many soybean traits, and accelerate the creation of improved soybean varieties.

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