Huddinge University Hospital

Huddinge, Sweden

Huddinge University Hospital

Huddinge, Sweden
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Schramm C.,University of Hamburg | Bubenheim M.,University of Rouen | Adam R.,Center Hepato Biliaire | Karam V.,Center Hepato Biliaire | And 23 more authors.
Liver Transplantation | Year: 2010

The principal aim of this study was to compare the probability of and potential risk factors for death and graft loss after primary adult and pediatric liver transplantation in patients undergoing transplantation for autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) to those in patients undergoing transplantation for primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC; used as the reference group) or alcoholic cirrhosis (used as an example of a nonautoimmune liver disease). The 5-year survival of patients undergoing transplantation for AIH (n = 827) was 0.73 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.67-0.77]. This was similar to that of patients undergoing transplantation for alcoholic cirrhosis (0.74, 95% CI = 0.72-0.76, n = 6424) but significantly worse than that of patients undergoing transplantation for PBC (0.83, 95% CI = 0.80-0.85, n = 1588). Fatal infectious complications occurred at an increased rate in patients with AIH (hazard ratio = 1.8, P = 0.002 with PBC as the reference). The outcome of pediatric AIH patients was similar to that of adult patients undergoing transplantation up to the age of 50 years. However, the survival of AIH patients undergoing transplantation beyond the age of 50 years (0.61 at 5 years, 95% CI = 0.51-0.70) was significantly reduced in comparison with the survival of young adult AIH patients (0.78 at 18-34 years, 95% CI = 0.70-0.86) and in comparison with the survival of patients of the same age group with PBC or alcoholic cirrhosis. In conclusion, age significantly affects patient survival after liver transplantation for AIH. The increased risk of dying of infectious complications in the early postoperative period, especially above the age of 50 years, should be acknowledged in the management of AIH patients with advanced-stage liver disease who are listed for liver transplantation. It should be noted that not all risk factors relevant to patient and graft survival could be analyzed with the European Liver Transplant Registry database. © 2010 AASLD.


Sebastian van As A.B.,University of Cape Town | Yusof A.M.,University of Cape Town | Millar A.J.W.,University of Cape Town | Gregori D.,University of Padua | And 83 more authors.
International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology | Year: 2012

Rationale and aim: The purpose of this study is to acquire a better understanding of Food Foreign Bodies (FFB) injuries in children characterizing the risk of complications and prolonged hospitalization due to food items according to patients' characteristics, circumstances of the accident, Foreign Body (FB) features and FB location, as emerging from the SUSY Safe Web-Registry. Methods: The present study uses data provided by the SUSY Safe Project, a DG SANCO co-funded project started in February 2005, which was aimed at establishing an international registry of cases of Foreign Bodies (FB) injuries in children aged 0-14 years. The analysis was carried out on injuries due to a food item.FB location was reported according to ICD9-CM code: ears (ICD931), nose (ICD932), pharynx and larynx (ICD933) trachea, bronchi and lungs (ICD934), mouth, esophagus and stomach (ICD935).Age and gender injury distributions were assessed. Data regarding adult supervision and activity before injury were also evaluated. FBs which most frequently cause complications were identified. The association between children age, adult presence, object characteristics and hospitalization/complications was computed using unweighted odds ratios and the related 95% confidence intervals. Results: 16,878 FB injuries occurred in children aged 0-14 years have been recorded in the SUSY Safe databases. FB type was specified in 10,564 cases; among them 2744 (26%) were due to a food item. FB site was recorded in 1344 cases: FB was located in the ears in 99 patients, while 1140 occurred in the upper and lower respiratory tract; finally, 105 food items were removed from mouth, esophagus and stomach. Complications occurred in 176 cases and the most documented was pulmonary or bronchial infections (23%) followed emphysema or atelectasis and by and asthma (7%). Bones were the commonest retrieved FFB encountered in this study, while nuts seem to be the FFB most frequently associated to complications. Conclusions: On the basis of this study we make the strong recommendation that parents should be adequately educated and provide age-appropriate food to their children and be present in order to supervise them during eating especially during a critical period ranging from 2 to 3 years of age. © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.


Passali F.M.,Catholic University of the Sacred Heart | Passali F.M.,University of Rome Tor Vergata | Passali G.C.,University of Rome Tor Vergata | Gulati A.,Maulana Azad Medical College and LN New Delhi | And 79 more authors.
International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology | Year: 2012

Rationale and aim: The aim of the present study is to acquire a better understanding of Non Food Foreign Bodies (NFFB) injuries in children with particular regard to the quantification of the risk of complications and hospitalization associated with patient characteristics, FB features, FB location and circumstances of the accident, as emerging from the SUSY Safe Web-Registry. Methods: The present study uses data provided by the SUSY Safe Project, a DG SANCO co-funded project which was aimed to collect as many scientific data as possible regarding Foreign Bodies (FB) injuries in children aged 0-14 years and to serve as a basis for a knowledge-based consumer protection activity in the Europe market. FBs were characterized by size, shape and consistency. Descriptive statistics (absolute and relative number or median, I and III quartile according to the categorical or continuous variable, respectively) were calculated for each considered non food item characteristics; FB features distribution by children class age and site of obstruction were assessed. Two different outcomes were considered: hospitalization and complication. FBs which most frequently cause complications were identified. The association between children age, adult presence, object characteristics and outcomes was computed using crude odds ratios and the related 95% confidence intervals. Results: 16,878 FB injuries in children aged 0-14 yrs have been recorded in the Susy Safe databases. FB type was specified in 10,564 cases; among them 7820 (74%) were due to a non food item. Almost two thirds of injuries occurred in patients 3 years or more old. 53% of patients were males, while 47% were females. When injury happened, the great part of children (86%) was playing. Almost 30% (2339) of injuries happened under adults' supervision. Complications occurred in 299 cases and the most documented was infections (10% of cases) followed by perforation (5%). Conclusions: The inhalation/aspiration of a FB, as well as the ingestion and the insertion in the orifices of a FB may result in significant morbidity. Particularly, long-standing or hazardous foreign bodies can cause extensive damage. Some objects, because of their composition, contour, or location, are particularly hazardous: for instance, objects with sharp edges pose a significant risk of laceration and perforation, while fragments of toys have been found only in 2 cases. Parents are frequently unconscious of hazard related with some objects and they are not adequately able to promptly recognize dangerous objects and risky situations. Moreover, also clinicians seem to pay little attention to adult role in the dynamic of the accident: in fact in case series descriptions, data regarding adult presence are often under-reported. On the contrary, since many injuries to children cannot be prevented without some degree of active behavior on the part of parents, the dissemination of information regarding safe behaviors and the implementation of educational strategies aiming to improve parent's attention toward this issue could be fundamental in preventing injuries and need to be promoted by family pediatricians and health practitioners. © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.


Gregori D.,University of Padua | Foltran F.,University of Padua | Ballali S.,PROCHILD ONLUS | Berchialla P.,University of Turin | And 79 more authors.
International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology | Year: 2012

Objectives: to collect relevant, up-to-date, representative, accurate, systematic information, related to foreign bodies (FB) injuries. Methods: The "Susy Safe" registry, a DG SANCO co-funded project gathering data on choking in all EU Countries and beyond, was established in order to create surveillance systems for suffocation injuries able to provide a risk-analysis profile for each of the products causing the injury. Main findings after 4 years of activities are resumed here. Results: 16,878 FB injuries occurred in children aged 0-14 years have been recorded in the SUSY SAFE databases; 8046 cases have been reported from countries outside EU. Almost one quart of the cases involving very young children (less than one year of age) presented a FB located in bronchial tract, thus representing a major threat to their health. Esophageal foreign bodies are still characterizing injuries occurred to children younger than one year, in older children the most common locations are the ears and the nose. FB type was specified in 10,564 cases. Food objects represented the 26% of the cases, whereas non-food objects were the remaining 74%. Among food objects, the most common were bones, nuts and seed, whereas for the non-food objects pearls, balls and marbles were observed most commonly (29%). Coins were involved in 15% of the non-food injuries and toys represented the 4% of the cases. Conclusions: this data collection system should be been taken into consideration for the calculation of the risk of injuries in order to provide the EU Commission with all the relevant estimates on FB injuries. © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.


Schmid C.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | Labopin M.,EBMT Study Office | Nagler A.,Chaim Sheba Medical Center | Niederwieser D.,University of Leipzig | And 16 more authors.
Blood | Year: 2012

Because information on management and outcome of AML relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) with reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) is scarce, a retrospective registry study was performed by the Acute LeukemiaWorking Party of EBMT. Among 2815 RIC transplants performed for AML in complete remission (CR) between 1999 and 2008, cumulative incidence of relapse was 32% ± 1%. Relapsed patients (263) were included into a detailed analysis of risk factors for overall survival (OS) and building of a prognostic score. CR was reinduced in 32%; remission duration after transplantation was the only prognostic factor for response (P = .003). Estimated 2-year OS from relapse was 14%, thereby resembling results of AML relapse after standard conditioning. Among variables available at the time of relapse, remission after HSCT>5 months (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.50, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.37-0.67, P < .001), bone marrow blasts less than 27% (HR = 0.53, 95% CI, 0.40-0.72, P < .001), and absence of acute GVHD after HSCT (HR = 0.67, 95% CI, 0.49-0.93, P = .017) were associated with better OS. Based on these factors, 3 prognostic groups could be discriminated, showing OS of 32% ± 7%, 19% ± 4%, and 4% ± 2% at 2 years (P < .0001). Long-term survival was achieved almost exclusively after successful induction of CR by cytoreductive therapy, followed either by donor lymphocyte infusion or second HSCT for consolidation. © 2012 by The American Society of Hematology.


de Witte T.,Radboud University Nijmegen | Hagemeijer A.,Universitair Ziekenhuis Gasthuisberg | Suciu S.,EORTC Headquarters | Belhabri A.,Hopital Edouard Herriot | And 16 more authors.
Haematologica | Year: 2010

Background Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is usually considered the only curative treatment option for patients with advanced or transformed myelodysplastic syndromes in complete remission, but post-remission chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation are potential alternatives, especially in patients over 45 years old. Design and Methods We evaluated, after intensive anti-leukemic remission-induction chemotherapy, the impact of the availability of an HLA-identical sibling donor on an intention-to treat basis. Additionally, all patients without a sibling donor in complete remission after the first consolidation course were randomized to either autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation or a second consolidation course consisting of high-dose cytarabine. Results The 4-year survival of the 341 evaluable patients was 28%. After achieving complete remission, the 4-year survival rates of patients under 55 years old with or without a donor were 54% and 41%, respectively, with an adjusted hazard ratio of 0.81 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.49-1.35) for survival and of 0.67 (95% CI, 0.42-1.06) for disease-free survival. In patients with intermediate/high risk cytogenetic abnormalities the hazard ratio in multivariate analysis was 0.58 (99% CI, 0.22-1.50) (P=0.14) for survival and 0.46 (99% CI, 0.22-1.50) for disease-free survival (P=0.03). In contrast, in patients with low risk cytogenetic characteristics the hazard ratio for survival was 1.17 (99% CI, 0.40-3.42) and that for disease-free survival was 1.02 (99% CI, 0.40-2.56). The 4-year survival of the 65 patients randomized to autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation or a second consolidation course of high-dose cytarabine was 37% and 27%, respectively. The hazard ratio in multivariate analysis was 1.22 (95% CI, 0.65-2.27) for survival and 1.02 (95% CI, 0.56-1.85) for disease-free survival. Conclusions Patients with a donor and candidates for allogeneic stem cell transplantation in first complete remission may have a better disease-free survival than those without a donor in case of myelodysplastic syndromes with intermediate/high-risk cytogenetics. Autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation does not provide longer survival than intensive chemotherapy. © 2010 Ferrata Storti Foundation.


Johnsen H.E.,Aarhus University Hospital | Johnsen H.E.,Herlev University Hospital | Bogsted M.,Aarhus University Hospital | Klausen T.W.,Herlev University Hospital | And 17 more authors.
Cytometry Part B - Clinical Cytometry | Year: 2010

Background and aim: The clinical impact of multiparametric flow cytometry (MFC) in multiple myeloma (MM) is still unclear and under evaluation. Further progress relies on multiparametric profiling of the neoplastic plasma cell (PC) compartment to provide an accurate image of the stage of differentiation. The primary aim of this study was to perform global analysis of CD expression on the PC compartment and subsequently to evaluate the prognostic impact. Secondary aims were to study the diagnostic and predictive impact. Design and methods: The design included a retrospective analysis of MFC data generated from diagnostic bone marrow (BM) samples of 109 Nordic patients included in clinical trials within NMSG. Whole marrow were analyzed by MFC for identification of end-stage CD45-/CD38++ neoplastic PC and registered the relative numbers of events and mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) staining for CD19, CD20, CD27, CD28, CD38, CD44, CD45, CD56, and isotypes for cluster analysis. Results: The median MFC-PC number was 15%, and the median light microscopy (LM)-PC number was 35%. However, the numbers were significant correlated and the prognostic value with an increased relative risk (95% CI) of 3.1 (1.7-5.5) and 2.9 (1.4-6.2), P < 0.0003 and P < 0.004 of MFC-PC and LM-PC counts, respectively. Unsupervised clustering based on global MFI assessment on PC revealed two clusters based on CD expression profiling. Cluster I with high intensity for CD56, CD38, CD45, right-angle light-scatter signal (SSC), forward-angle light-scatter signal (FSC), and low for CD28, CD19, and a Cluster II, with low intensity of CD56, CD38, CD45, SSC, FSC, and high for CD28, CD19 with a median survival of 39 months and 19 months, respectively (P = 0.02). Conclusions: The MFC analysis of MM BM samples produces diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive information useful in clinical practice, which will be prospectively validated within the European Myeloma Network (EMN). © 2010 International Clinical Cytometry Society.


PubMed | Medical Intensive Care Unit, Huddinge University Hospital and Linköping University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Technology and health care : official journal of the European Society for Engineering and Medicine | Year: 2014

This paper will demonstrate the clinical application of a knowledge-based decision-support system called VentEx for ventilator management. VentEx has been implemented using a knowledge-based development tool on a PC under the Microsoft Windows multitasking environment. It is integrated into a computer aided ventilator system including the Siemens Elema Servo Ventilator 900 C equipped with a Servo Computer Module 990 and the CO2 analyser 930. The system provides advanced ventilator monitoring with expert advice concerning ventilator strategy and settings based on data from on-line monitoring. The knowledge base has been primarily validated and the system has been clinically tested by the intensive care unit staff. Different approaches such as knowledge acquisition, representation and system integration have been outlined and discussed.

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