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Klosterneuburg, Austria

Koeck A.,AIT Austrian Institute of Technology | Bruck R.,AIT Austrian Institute of Technology | Wellenzohn M.,AIT Austrian Institute of Technology | Hainberger R.,AIT Austrian Institute of Technology | And 11 more authors.
Journal of Vacuum Science and Technology B:Nanotechnology and Microelectronics | Year: 2010

The authors have successfully employed the charged particle nanopatterning (CHARPAN) technology for nanostructuring of a metal mold insert for a conventional injection molding machine. High-precision diamond-milled Ni-Cu mold inserts have been nanopatterned with 10 keV argon ion multibeam milling with feature sizes as small as 50 nm. A variety of structures such as circles, hexagons, and lines in different dimensions, with positive and negative shapes, have been fabricated in the metal mold. These structures have been successfully replicated in polymethylpentene samples by injection molding. To the authors' best knowledge, the CHARPAN technology is one of the very few technologies that allow for resistless nanostructuring a field size of 25×25 μ m 2 into a metal mold in a single shot. This is of high importance for the practical injection molding fabrication of nanostructured polymer devices such as optical biosensors. © 2010 American Vacuum Society. Source


Bruck R.,AIT Austrian Institute of Technology | Hainberger R.,AIT Austrian Institute of Technology | Heer R.,AIT Austrian Institute of Technology | Kataeva N.,AIT Austrian Institute of Technology | And 5 more authors.
Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering | Year: 2010

Various nanostructures with a feature sizes down to 50 nm as well as photonic structures such as waveguides or grating couplers were successfully replicated into the thermoplastic polymer polymethylpentene employing an injection molding process. Polymethylpentene has highly attractive characteristics for photonic and life-science applications such as a high thermal stability, an outstanding chemical resistivity and excellent optical transparency. In our injection molding process, the structures were directly replicated from 2" silicon wafers that serve as an exchangeable mold insert in the injection mold. We present this injection molding process as a versatile technology platform for the realization of optical integrated devices and diffractive optical components. In particular, we show the application of the injection molding process for the realization of waveguide and grating coupler structures, subwavelength gratings and focusing nanoholes. © 2010 Copyright SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Source


Hainberger R.,AIT Austrian Institute of Technology | Bruck R.,AIT Austrian Institute of Technology | Kataeva N.,AIT Austrian Institute of Technology | Heer R.,AIT Austrian Institute of Technology | And 5 more authors.
Microelectronic Engineering | Year: 2010

This paper reports the well-controlled replication of nanostructures with features sizes as small as 50 nm on the surface of polymethylpentene (PMP) substrates by injection molding. A 2″ silicon wafer carrying the nanostructures served as exchangeable mold insert. This PMP injection molding process is aimed at developing a planar optical polymer waveguide platform for evanescent wave sensing. In particular we focus on disposable polymer optical biochips for the label-free detection of bio-molecules. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Source

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