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Liu X.,Huazhong Agricultural University | Liu X.,Hubei Provincial Engineering Laboratory for New Type Fertilizer | Wang Q.,Wuhan Military Economic Academy | Hu C.,Huazhong Agricultural University | And 7 more authors.
Soil Science and Plant Nutrition | Year: 2016

Selenite is a form of selenium (Se) commonly found in Se-excessive soils. To regulate the Se content in plants in high-Se areas, a potted soil experiment was performed on oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) to evaluate the effects of varied amounts of sulfur (S) on the biomass, accumulation and distribution of Se in B. napus under the conditions of different amounts of Se in the soil. The results showed that the seedlings of B. napus were more sensitive to Se than the mature plants were. The addition of S significantly alleviated the growth inhibition in seedlings and facilitated the growth of mature plants under higher Se (15 mg kg−1) conditions. S treatment significantly decreased soil pH within the range of 0.22–0.60. An appropriate moderate amount (150 mg kg−1) of S exerted the strongest inhibition on Se concentration and accumulation in B. napus at the seedling stage, but a higher amount (300 mg kg−1) of S led to a more significant decrease in the mature plants under higher Se conditions, with the maximum reduction in various parts of B. napus reaching 51.3–60.9% and 42.5–53.4%, respectively. The application of S only affected the uptake of Se, and not the translocation of Se; the accumulation of Se in B. napus follows the sequence of pod ≈ stem > rapeseed > root, and the distribution ratio is approximately 1.00:0.97:0.69:0.49. Overall, the application of S alleviated the inhibitory effect on growth caused by excessive Se by reducing the Se concentration in B. napus and facilitating its growth, suggesting that S treatment is a suitable and highly cost-effective method to regulate the content of Se in B. napus. © 2016 Japanese Society of Soil Science and Plant Nutrition Source


Liu X.-W.,Huazhong Agricultural University | Liu X.-W.,Hubei Provincial Engineering Laboratory for New Type Fertilizer | Wang Q.-L.,Wuhan Military Economic Academy | Duan B.-H.,Huazhong Agricultural University | And 9 more authors.
Chinese Journal of Applied Ecology | Year: 2015

The rape (Brassica napus L. cv. Xiangnongyou 571) was chosen as the experimental material to undergo solution cultivation at seedling stage to investigate the effects of selenite addition on the selenium (Se) absorption and distribution, root morphology and physiological characteristics of rape seedlings. The results showed that the bioaccumulation ability of Se decreased significantly with increasing the Se application rate, but the Se distribution coefficient remained around 0.9 with no significant influence. The application of 10 μmol·L-1 selenite stimulated the growth of rape seedlings through improving the root physiological characteristics and root morphology significantly, including significantly increasing the production of superoxide radical (O2-·) rate and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD) and fungal catalase (CAT) in the root system, which resulted in a reduction of the lipids peroxidation (MDA) content as much as 26.0%, consequently increasing the root activity as much as 17.4%. The promoting degrees of selenite on root morphological parameters were from strong to weak in such a tendency: root volume > total surface area > number of root forks > total root length > number of root tips > average diameter. However, such positive effects had no significant difference with those in treatment with 1 μmol·L-1 selenite, indicating that small amounts (≤10 μmol·L-1) of selenite were able to increase the activity of antioxidant enzymes and reduce the content of MDA in root system, which could increase root activity and improve root morphology, hence increased the biomass of rape seedlings. ©, 2015, Editorial Board of Chinese Journal of Applied Ecology. All right reserved. Source


Liu X.,Huazhong Agricultural University | Liu X.,Hubei Provincial Engineering Laboratory for New Type Fertilizer | Zhao Z.,Huazhong Agricultural University | Zhao Z.,Hubei Provincial Engineering Laboratory for New Type Fertilizer | And 6 more authors.
Plant and Soil | Year: 2016

Aims: To clarify the effect of sulphate on the uptake and translocation of selenium (Se) by rape (Brassica napus L.) with Se applied as selenite or selenate. Methods: Three hydroponic experiments were conducted at the seedling stage of B. napus. Selenium concentrations in plant and culture solution samples were analyzed by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS-8220). Results: The Se absorption capacity of B. napus supplied with selenate or selenite was the same at 0.1 mM sulphate. The translocation factor of Se was significantly reduced by up to 46.4 % with increasing selenite in solution, while sulphate had no effect on Se translocation in selenite treatment. The translocation factor of Se was substantially increased by up to 60.5 % with increasing selenate in solution, and the application of sulphate appeared to facilitate Se translocation in selenate treatment. The positive effect of sulphate was more significant with extended treatment time, but unrelated to selenate or sulphate concentration. Conclusions: The Se absorption capacity of B. napus supplied with selenite or selenate depends on the concentration of sulphate. Sulphate is involved in the root-to-shoot translocation of Se in B. napus supplied with selenate, but not selenite. These results need confirming in pot and field trials. © 2015, Springer International Publishing Switzerland. Source


Liu X.,Huazhong Agricultural University | Liu X.,Hubei Provincial Engineering Laboratory for New Type Fertilizer | Duan B.,Huazhong Agricultural University | Duan B.,Hubei Provincial Engineering Laboratory for New Type Fertilizer | And 10 more authors.
Huanjing Kexue Xuebao/Acta Scientiae Circumstantiae | Year: 2015

In order to explore how wheat uptake and translocate selenite and selenate when treated by sulfate (S), we studied selenium (Se) concentration changes at different parts of wheat under the interaction between different concentrations of Se and S based on hydroponic experiment. Results showed that the addition of 0.1 mmol·L-1 S reduced the uptake potential (Vmax) and the affinity (1/Km) of wheat on selenate by 25.7% and 90.8%, respectively, compared to the zero S treatment. S reduced the uptake difference of Se treated with selenite and selenate mainly by reducing the affinity of selenate on wheat root. Translocation factor (TF) of Se significantly reduced as the concentration of selenite increased, with maximum decreasing amplitude of 35.3%, while S showed no significant impact. TF of Se significantly increased as the concentration of selenate increased, with the maximum increasing amplitude of 53.8%, and S significantly promoted such increase. After selenite treatment, Se accumulated in wheat root was continuously transported towards shoot regardless of whether treated by S or not. After selenate treatment, Se accumulated in wheat root was continuously transported towards shoot only under S treatment conditions. The application of S fertilizer could prevent excessive consumption of Se in soil, promoting Se translocation towards edible parts. ©, 2015, Science Press. All right reserved. Source


Liu X.-W.,Huazhong Agricultural University | Liu X.-W.,Hubei Provincial Engineering Laboratory for New Type Fertilizer | Duan B.-H.,Huazhong Agricultural University | Duan B.-H.,Hubei Provincial Engineering Laboratory for New Type Fertilizer | And 10 more authors.
Huanjing Kexue/Environmental Science | Year: 2014

The high-quality, high-yield rape (Brassica napus L. cv. Xiangnongyou 571) was chosen as the experimental material to undergo seedling stage soil cultivation and solution cultivation. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of sulfur (S) on the fraction and species of amend selenium (Se) in soil by applying S fertilizer, and to reveal the mechanism through which S controls the Se uptake of rape. The results showed that applications of both Se at 5 mg·kg-1 and S at 150 mg·kg-1 could provide some boost to rape growth, however such boost was unremarkable; S application could significantly reduce Se content in shoots and roots by as much as 64.0% and 39.1%, respectively; S application could significantly decrease the pH value and increase the organic matter content by as much as 0.65 units and 1.76 g·kg-1, respectively; S application could significantly decrease soluble Se and Fe/Mn oxide-bound Se, and significantly increase organic matter-bound Se, however, there was no remarkable effect on exchangeable and residual Se. S could significantly decrease the content of Se(IV) in the soluble Se and significantly increase the content of Se(IV) in the exchangeable Se, with remarkable decrease in Se(VI) content in both fractions, and no remarkable effect on Se(II). S had a profound effect on the uptake of Se by rape seedlings when Se(IV) and Se(VI) were applied. The Se contents in shoot and root of the Se(VI)-treated rape were 7.3 and 3.2 times respectively as high as that of the Se(IV)-treated rape, while with a S rate of 2 mmol·L-1, their Se contents were lower than 32.6% and 8.7% of that of the Se(IV)-treated rape. In conclusion, in addition to improving crop growth, appropriate amount of S fertilizer could also reduce soil pH and increase organic content, causing available Se in soil to be Fe/Mn oxide-bound and organic matter-bound, and retarding its transformation to Se(VI), thus reducing Se uptake by rape. This has significant value for regulation of Se content in crops from Se-rich regions, ensuring food quality and safety, benefiting the long-term use of soil Se resources and regional economic development. Source

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