HSBC Holdings plc is a British multinational banking and financial services company headquartered in London, United Kingdom. It is the world's second largest bank. It was founded in London in 1991 by the Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation to act as a new group holding company. The origins of the bank lie in Hong Kong and Shanghai, where branches were first opened in 1865. The HSBC name is derived from the initials of the Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation. As such, the company refers to both the United Kingdom and Hong Kong as its "home markets".HSBC has around 6,600 offices in 80 countries and territories across Africa, Asia, Europe, North America and South America, and around 60 million customers. As of 31 December 2013, it had total assets of $2.671 trillion, of which roughly half were in Europe, the Middle East and Africa, and a quarter in each of Asia-Pacific and the Americas. As of 2012, it was the world's largest bank in terms of assets and sixth-largest public company, according to a composite measure by Forbes magazine.HSBC is organised within four business groups: Commercial Banking; Global Banking and Markets ; Retail Banking and Wealth Management; and Global Private Banking.HSBC has a dual primary listing on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange and London Stock Exchange and is a constituent of the Hang Seng Index and the FTSE 100 Index. As of 6 July 2012 it had a market capitalisation of £102.7 billion, the second-largest company listed on the London Stock Exchange, after Royal Dutch Shell. It has secondary listings on the New York Stock Exchange, Euronext Paris and the Bermuda Stock Exchange. Wikipedia.

SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

News Article | September 26, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

Singapore has again been rated by expats as the best country in the world to live and work, in the new HSBC Expat Explorer survey. Singapore saw off competition from Norway, which rose four places to come second. Culturally very different yet both highly-regarded, Singapore and Norway offer expats a stable economic and political environment while giving them a fulfilling experience and an improved family life. Now in its tenth year, the HSBC Expat Explorer survey is the world's largest and longest running study of expat life, asking more than 27,500 expats about their experience abroad.  As well as unveiling the best places in the world to live as an expat, the survey also found that life abroad typically increases expats' income by 25%, with the average expat earning just under USD100,000 a year. Far from compromising their wellbeing, expats seem to find the right balance. Four in ten (41%) expats adopt a more positive outlook on life after moving abroad, with 44% becoming more physically active. The Expat Explorer overall league table ranks each country or territory using a score that summarises expats' views on economics, experience and family life aspects in their host country. Singapore, balancing all aspects of expat life  Confidence in the political stability (83%) and local economy (73%), a great quality of life (64% say it is better than at home) and a positive experience for families are among the reasons why Singapore has topped the Expat Explorer league table again. Indeed, 73% say the country offers better earning prospects than their home country and two-thirds (65%) enjoy more disposable income. Expats moving to Singapore report an average 42% increase in their annual income compared to home, to almost USD118,000. Not only is Singapore a land of economic opportunity, it is also a top destination to raise a family. Four in five expats (82%) feel safer there than at home and 72% of expat parents rate the quality of education and the health and well-being of their children better than in their home country. This compares with 49%, 44% and 50% globally. But expat life in Singapore can come at a price. Expats are less likely to see an improvement in their work/life balance than those in other destinations (47% compared to 53% globally). More than four in five expat parents (84%) find that the cost of raising children in Singapore is more expensive than at home. Norway, meanwhile, is up four places in the league table and narrowly misses out on the top spot. The majority (90%) of expats in Norway say that their work/life balance has improved and 78% that the job security is better than at home (compared with 53% and 41% globally). Furthermore, 82% of expat parents say that their children's overall quality of life is better than at home, compared with 59% globally. These much appreciated upsides are typical of the Nordic model, characterised by a flexible yet secure employment market as well as free education and universal healthcare. Top expat destinations for Economics, Experience and Family  In addition to the overall country league table, the Expat Explorer report ranks countries in three sub league tables - Economics looks at the impact moving abroad has on expats' wealth, Experience focuses on health and quality of life, and Family looks at the best places in the world to bring up a child. Expat Economics: European countries lead the way  European countries head this year's Economics league table, with Switzerland coming top for the third year in a row. The strong Swiss economy and stable political environment are appreciated by expats. The vast majority (89%) of expats feel confident about the economy, while 78% say their earning prospects are better than at home. Switzerland is not the only Economics hot spot, however. Germany performs well for career development, with 62% of expats in the country saying it is a good place to progress their career, compared with 54% globally. Expat Experience: New Zealand and Spain praised for the quality of life  New Zealand comes top in the Experience league table. Almost three in five expats (58%) moved to the 'land of the long white cloud' to improve their quality of life, compared to just a third (34%) of expats globally. Almost three-quarters (72%) are integrating well with the local people and culture. New Zealand is followed by Spain (2nd) and Portugal (3rd), with Singapore and Australia completing the top 5. Spain and Portugal are lauded by expats for their healthy lifestyles. Almost three-fifths of expats in Spain (58%) and in Portugal (57%) say their physical health is better as a result of the move, compared to a global average of 36%. Mexico has moved up seven places from 20th to 13th, with 81% of expats there enjoying immersing themselves in the local culture, compared with 62% globally. Expat Family: The Netherlands is the new hotspot    The Netherlands has overtaken Sweden as the best place to raise a family, rising nine places in one year. More than three-quarters (76%) of expat parents in the Netherlands say the health and wellbeing of their children is better than it was at home. Expat parents also praise the quality of education and childcare, with 72% and 65% respectively saying it is better than at home. Last year's winner, Sweden, ranks as the second best country to raise a family. Nearly three-quarters (72%) of expat parents rate the quality of childcare as better than at home and 71% said the process of arranging a school for their children was straightforward. Other country moves in the Expat Explorer league table: #10 UAE: Back for good  A renowned destination for expats, the UAE is back in the top 10 and is living up to its promise. More than half (56 %) say they moved there to improve their earnings, compared with 22% of expats globally. The benefits of expat life in the UAE are not limited to finances. More than half (55 %) say their work/life balance is better than at home and more than three in five (62 %) say their overall quality of life has improved. The same goes for families, with 66% of expat parents saying their children's quality of life is better since the move. #14 India: Best ever ranking  Driven by strong ratings across a range of economic, experience and family measures, India shines in this year's league table, moving up 12 places. Expats rated India as an improved destination for being a good place to progress your career (up 12 percentage points to 63%), having the ability to save more (up 11 percentage points to 64%), having a better overall quality of life (up 12 percentage points to 43%) and integrating well with local people and culture (up 9 percentage point to 67%). #35 UK: Mixed sentiments with positive experiences  Down 13 places to 35th, the UK's ranking has been affected by a 20 percentage point drop in confidence in the economy (43%) and a 22 percentage point fall in confidence in the country's political stability (31%). However, expats still believe the UK offers a positive experience. Almost seven in ten (68%) say the UK is a good place for expats who want to progress their career compared with a global average of 54%, and 56% say that earning prospects are better than at home compared with 50% globally. Almost seven in ten expats are integrating well with the British people (69%) and enjoy immersing themselves in the local culture (68%). Dean Blackburn, Head of HSBC Expat, comments:  "Each year that we conduct the Expat Explorer survey, I am amazed by the diversity of the expat community. From young entrepreneurs and career climbers to families looking for a fresh adventure, there is a destination out there to suit everyone. "Singapore has been rated the number one destination by expats for the last three years, offering economic stability, a great quality of life and a safe environment for families. The rise of countries like Norway, Germany and the Netherlands up the table this year shows how quickly destinations can become expat hot spots. "However, becoming an expat is not without its challenges. Living across international borders can make securing their financial wellbeing harder. Whatever their priorities are, financial planning can help them get there." Expats' ratings of 46 host countries are available to explore online through the Expat Explorer interactive tool. About the Expat Explorer survey and country league table  The Expat Explorer survey was open to adults over 18 years old currently living away from their country of origin/home country. The survey was completed by 27,587 expats from 159 countries and territories through an online questionnaire in March and April 2017, conducted by YouGov and commissioned by HSBC Expat. A minimum sample of 100 expat respondents and at least 30 expat parents is required for a country to be included in the league tables, with 46 countries qualifying in 2017. About HSBC  HSBC Holdings plc, the parent company of the HSBC Group, is headquartered in London. The Group serves customers worldwide from around 3,900 offices in 67 countries and territories in Europe, Asia, North and Latin America, and the Middle East and North Africa. With assets of US$2,492bn at 30 June 2017, HSBC is one of the world's largest banking and financial services organisations. About HSBC Expat  HSBC Expat is a trading name of HSBC Bank International Limited. HSBC Expat is an award winning provider of expat financial services, with its head office based in Jersey, Channel Islands. It also has representation in Dubai and Hong Kong. As part of HSBC Holdings plc, HSBC Expat has the experience to offer tailored financial solutions to customers living and working abroad. For more information visit: www.expat.hsbc.com.


News Article | September 26, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

Singapore has again been rated by expats as the best country in the world to live and work, in the new HSBC Expat Explorer survey. Singapore saw off competition from Norway, which rose four places to come second. Culturally very different yet both highly-regarded, Singapore and Norway offer expats a stable economic and political environment while giving them a fulfilling experience and an improved family life. Now in its tenth year, the HSBC Expat Explorer survey is the world's largest and longest running study of expat life, asking more than 27,500 expats about their experience abroad.  As well as unveiling the best places in the world to live as an expat, the survey also found that life abroad typically increases expats' income by 25%, with the average expat earning just under USD100,000 a year. Far from compromising their wellbeing, expats seem to find the right balance. Four in ten (41%) expats adopt a more positive outlook on life after moving abroad, with 44% becoming more physically active. The Expat Explorer overall league table ranks each country or territory using a score that summarises expats' views on economics, experience and family life aspects in their host country. Singapore, balancing all aspects of expat life  Confidence in the political stability (83%) and local economy (73%), a great quality of life (64% say it is better than at home) and a positive experience for families are among the reasons why Singapore has topped the Expat Explorer league table again. Indeed, 73% say the country offers better earning prospects than their home country and two-thirds (65%) enjoy more disposable income. Expats moving to Singapore report an average 42% increase in their annual income compared to home, to almost USD118,000. Not only is Singapore a land of economic opportunity, it is also a top destination to raise a family. Four in five expats (82%) feel safer there than at home and 72% of expat parents rate the quality of education and the health and well-being of their children better than in their home country. This compares with 49%, 44% and 50% globally. But expat life in Singapore can come at a price. Expats are less likely to see an improvement in their work/life balance than those in other destinations (47% compared to 53% globally). More than four in five expat parents (84%) find that the cost of raising children in Singapore is more expensive than at home. Norway, meanwhile, is up four places in the league table and narrowly misses out on the top spot. The majority (90%) of expats in Norway say that their work/life balance has improved and 78% that the job security is better than at home (compared with 53% and 41% globally). Furthermore, 82% of expat parents say that their children's overall quality of life is better than at home, compared with 59% globally. These much appreciated upsides are typical of the Nordic model, characterised by a flexible yet secure employment market as well as free education and universal healthcare. Top expat destinations for Economics, Experience and Family  In addition to the overall country league table, the Expat Explorer report ranks countries in three sub league tables - Economics looks at the impact moving abroad has on expats' wealth, Experience focuses on health and quality of life, and Family looks at the best places in the world to bring up a child. Expat Economics: European countries lead the way  European countries head this year's Economics league table, with Switzerland coming top for the third year in a row. The strong Swiss economy and stable political environment are appreciated by expats. The vast majority (89%) of expats feel confident about the economy, while 78% say their earning prospects are better than at home. Switzerland is not the only Economics hot spot, however. Germany performs well for career development, with 62% of expats in the country saying it is a good place to progress their career, compared with 54% globally. Expat Experience: New Zealand and Spain praised for the quality of life  New Zealand comes top in the Experience league table. Almost three in five expats (58%) moved to the 'land of the long white cloud' to improve their quality of life, compared to just a third (34%) of expats globally. Almost three-quarters (72%) are integrating well with the local people and culture. New Zealand is followed by Spain (2nd) and Portugal (3rd), with Singapore and Australia completing the top 5. Spain and Portugal are lauded by expats for their healthy lifestyles. Almost three-fifths of expats in Spain (58%) and in Portugal (57%) say their physical health is better as a result of the move, compared to a global average of 36%. Mexico has moved up seven places from 20th to 13th, with 81% of expats there enjoying immersing themselves in the local culture, compared with 62% globally. Expat Family: The Netherlands is the new hotspot    The Netherlands has overtaken Sweden as the best place to raise a family, rising nine places in one year. More than three-quarters (76%) of expat parents in the Netherlands say the health and wellbeing of their children is better than it was at home. Expat parents also praise the quality of education and childcare, with 72% and 65% respectively saying it is better than at home. Last year's winner, Sweden, ranks as the second best country to raise a family. Nearly three-quarters (72%) of expat parents rate the quality of childcare as better than at home and 71% said the process of arranging a school for their children was straightforward. Other country moves in the Expat Explorer league table: #10 UAE: Back for good  A renowned destination for expats, the UAE is back in the top 10 and is living up to its promise. More than half (56 %) say they moved there to improve their earnings, compared with 22% of expats globally. The benefits of expat life in the UAE are not limited to finances. More than half (55 %) say their work/life balance is better than at home and more than three in five (62 %) say their overall quality of life has improved. The same goes for families, with 66% of expat parents saying their children's quality of life is better since the move. #14 India: Best ever ranking  Driven by strong ratings across a range of economic, experience and family measures, India shines in this year's league table, moving up 12 places. Expats rated India as an improved destination for being a good place to progress your career (up 12 percentage points to 63%), having the ability to save more (up 11 percentage points to 64%), having a better overall quality of life (up 12 percentage points to 43%) and integrating well with local people and culture (up 9 percentage point to 67%). #35 UK: Mixed sentiments with positive experiences  Down 13 places to 35th, the UK's ranking has been affected by a 20 percentage point drop in confidence in the economy (43%) and a 22 percentage point fall in confidence in the country's political stability (31%). However, expats still believe the UK offers a positive experience. Almost seven in ten (68%) say the UK is a good place for expats who want to progress their career compared with a global average of 54%, and 56% say that earning prospects are better than at home compared with 50% globally. Almost seven in ten expats are integrating well with the British people (69%) and enjoy immersing themselves in the local culture (68%). Dean Blackburn, Head of HSBC Expat, comments:  "Each year that we conduct the Expat Explorer survey, I am amazed by the diversity of the expat community. From young entrepreneurs and career climbers to families looking for a fresh adventure, there is a destination out there to suit everyone. "Singapore has been rated the number one destination by expats for the last three years, offering economic stability, a great quality of life and a safe environment for families. The rise of countries like Norway, Germany and the Netherlands up the table this year shows how quickly destinations can become expat hot spots. "However, becoming an expat is not without its challenges. Living across international borders can make securing their financial wellbeing harder. Whatever their priorities are, financial planning can help them get there." Expats' ratings of 46 host countries are available to explore online through the Expat Explorer interactive tool. About the Expat Explorer survey and country league table  The Expat Explorer survey was open to adults over 18 years old currently living away from their country of origin/home country. The survey was completed by 27,587 expats from 159 countries and territories through an online questionnaire in March and April 2017, conducted by YouGov and commissioned by HSBC Expat. A minimum sample of 100 expat respondents and at least 30 expat parents is required for a country to be included in the league tables, with 46 countries qualifying in 2017. About HSBC  HSBC Holdings plc, the parent company of the HSBC Group, is headquartered in London. The Group serves customers worldwide from around 3,900 offices in 67 countries and territories in Europe, Asia, North and Latin America, and the Middle East and North Africa. With assets of US$2,492bn at 30 June 2017, HSBC is one of the world's largest banking and financial services organisations. About HSBC Expat  HSBC Expat is a trading name of HSBC Bank International Limited. HSBC Expat is an award winning provider of expat financial services, with its head office based in Jersey, Channel Islands. It also has representation in Dubai and Hong Kong. As part of HSBC Holdings plc, HSBC Expat has the experience to offer tailored financial solutions to customers living and working abroad. For more information visit: www.expat.hsbc.com.


NEW YORK--(BUSINESS WIRE)--HSBC Finance Corporation (“HSBC Finance”) hereby announces the early tender results of its previously announced offer to purchase for cash up to $1,104,230,000 (the “Tender Cap”) of its outstanding 6.676% Senior Subordinated Notes due January 15, 2021 (CUSIP: 40429CGD8, 40429CGB2 and U4428DCD4; ISIN: US40429CGD83, US40429CGB28 and USU4428DCD40) (the “Notes”), from holders thereof (each, a “Holder” and collectively, the “Holders”), at the price set forth below, upon the terms and subject to the conditions set forth in the Offer to Purchase dated September 5, 2017 (as it may be amended or supplemented from time to time, the “Offer to Purchase”) and in the related Letter of Transmittal dated September 5, 2017 (as it may be amended or supplemented from time to time, the “Letter of Transmittal” and, together with the Offer to Purchase, the “Offer Documents”), which together constitute the Offer (the “Offer”). On September 18, 2017, at 5:00 p.m., New York City time (the Early Tender Date”), HSBC Finance had received valid tenders (which tenders were not validly withdrawn or revoked) from Holders of an aggregate of $1,555 million in principal amount of the Notes (the “Early Tender Notes”). Withdrawal rights for the Notes expired at 5:00 p.m., New York City time, on September 18, 2017. Pursuant to the Offer Documents, because the aggregate principal amount of Early Tender Notes validly tendered and not validly withdrawn or revoked exceeds the Tender Cap, HSBC Finance will accept for purchase the Early Tender Notes on a prorated basis in the proportion of approximately 71 percent of the principal amount of the Early Tender Notes (the “Accepted Notes”). HSBC Finance will accept for purchase the aggregate principal amount of Early Tender Notes tendered by a Holder multiplied by the proration rate and then rounded down to the nearest $1,000 increment. The aggregate consideration payable under the Offer for the Accepted Notes is approximately $1,268 million, which represents a total consideration of $1,148.41 per $1,000 principal amount of the Accepted Notes, in each case, excluding any accrued and unpaid interest on the Accepted Notes. The Accepted Notes represent approximately 38 percent of the principal amount outstanding of Notes as of September 18, 2017. The Early Settlement Date will be on September 20, 2017. Because the Offer was fully subscribed as of the Early Tender Date, HSBC Finance will not accept for purchase any Notes not already purchased on the Early Settlement Date. Any Notes tendered pursuant to the Offer but not accepted for purchase by HSBC Finance on the Early Settlement Date will be promptly returned to Holders. Global Bondholder Services Corporation is acting as the depositary and as the information agent for the Offer. HSBC Securities (USA) Inc. is acting as Dealer Manager for the Offer. Persons with questions about the Offer should contact HSBC Securities (USA) Inc. at +1 (888) HSBC-4LM (toll free) or +1 (212) 525-5552 (collect). Requests for documents should be directed to Global Bondholder Services Corporation at +1 (212) 430-3774 (banks and brokers) or +1 (866) 470-3800 (all others toll free) or by email at contact@gbsc-usa.com. The Offer Documents will be available online at http://www.gbsc-usa.com/HSBC/ until the consummation of the Offer. As previously disclosed, in connection with the Offer, on September 5, 2017, HSBC Finance entered into a definitive agreement with its ultimate parent, HSBC Holdings plc (“HSBC Holdings”) pursuant to which HSBC Finance has agreed to repurchase (the “Repurchase”), subject to the terms and conditions contained therein, $730,770,000 of Notes (the “Repurchase Notes”), representing all of the outstanding Notes held by HSBC Holdings. The Notes purchased by HSBC Finance in the Repurchase will be in addition to those accepted for purchase in the Offer and will not count toward the Tender Cap. The purchase price payable for the Repurchase Notes will be approximately $839 million, excluding any accrued and unpaid interest on the Repurchase Notes. HSBC Finance expects to pay the purchase price for the Repurchase Notes on September 20, 2017. As a result of the Offer and the Repurchase, HSBC Finance expects to record during the third quarter of 2017 a one-time charge reflecting a loss on early extinguishment of debt that is estimated to be approximately $260 million. After the purchase of the Accepted Notes and the Repurchase Notes on September 20, 2017, the aggregate principal amount of Notes outstanding will be approximately $1,104 million. This press release is for information purposes only and is not an offer to purchase or a solicitation of acceptance of an offer to purchase any of the Notes. The Offer is being made pursuant to the Offer Documents, which HSBC Finance is distributing to Holders of Notes. The Offer is not being made to Holders of Notes in any jurisdiction in which the making or acceptance thereof would not be in compliance with the securities, “blue sky” or other laws of such jurisdiction. Certain statements in this press release are “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the rules and regulations of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. These statements are based on management’s current expectations and are subject to uncertainty and changes in circumstances. Actual results and other financial conditions may differ materially from those included in these statements due to a variety of factors including those contained in HSBC Finance’s filings with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, including without limitation the “Risk Factors” section of HSBC Finance’s 2016 Annual Report on Form 10-K. Precautionary statements included in such filings should be read in conjunction with this press release. HSBC Finance Corporation, through its subsidiaries, owns and services a portfolio of residential real estate loans. HSBC Finance Corporation is a subsidiary of HSBC North America Holdings Inc.


Embodiments of the invention include a computer implemented method for automatically modifying the terms of a plurality of mortgages within a portfolio of mortgages, such that, monthly payments for the plurality of mortgages are reduced. The method includes calculating a current net present value for each of the mortgages in the portfolio of mortgages. The method also includes calculating a plurality of future net present values for each of the mortgages in the portfolio, each future net present value corresponding to one set of modified loan terms. The method also includes selecting the largest calculated future net present value. The method also includes automatically modifying the loan terms of each of the plurality of mortgages where the largest future net present value is greater than the current net present value. Loan terms are modified to correspond to the modified loan terms resulting in the largest net present value.


Embodiment of the invention describe methods and systems for verifying customer supplied financial account information verification using debit and credit transactions. These methods include electronically transmitting an electronic debit and credit transaction to the customer financial account, based on the customer supplied financial account information. The method also includes electronically transmitting a first statement descriptor, as part of at least one of the electronic debit transaction and the electronic credit transaction, that includes a first verification code. The method also includes electronically receiving, from the customer, a second verification code, and comparing, by the computer system, the transmitted first verification code with the received second verification code with respect to each other. The method also includes verifying, by the computer system, the customer supplied financial account information based on the comparison of the verification codes.


Embodiments of the invention are directed to system and method for managing parallel development of projects. One embodiment of the invention is a method of automatically managing processes in the parallel development of an application through a graphical user interface. The graphical user interface manages the automated processes, which are able to complete their tasks without further user interaction. The automated processes managed by the graphical user interface include, provisioning a first development environment and second development environment. The processes also includes deploying a second release of an application to the second development environment, and merging modifications to the second source code and the second content of the second release into a first source code and a first content of the first release. After the releases have been merged together, the process automatically deploys the third release of the application to a production environment for use by users.


An application processing engine computer system is configured to process an application for at least one of a product and service using a plurality of coordinated, configurable services. The application processing engine includes an application data management service, an application process flow management service, a decisioning service, an application processing host service, an application activity monitoring service, a queue management service and/or a system maintenance service. Various embodiments are described, including a computer implemented method for processing an application using an application processing engine component and/or module.


The present invention provides, in alternative embodiments, a computer architecture and/or computer implemented methods for account opening. In some embodiments, an integrated, component-based technology platform, globally standardized, business configurable account opening processes are separate and decoupled from the user interface screens and are directly manageable by business functionality and/or personnel. In various embodiments, the invention provides pause and resume, save and retrieve, cross-channel, metrics, audit tracking, data logging, and/or straight-through processing capabilities for account opening.


Embodiments of the invention are directed to system and method for managing parallel development of projects. One embodiment of the invention is a method of automatically managing processes in the parallel development of an application through a graphical user interface. The graphical user interface manages the automated processes, which are able to complete their tasks without further user interaction. The automated processes managed by the graphical user interface include, provisioning a first development environment and second development environment. The processes also includes deploying a second release of an application to the second development environment, and merging modifications to the second source code and the second content of the second release into a first source code and a first content of the first release. After the releases have been merged together, the process automatically deploys the third release of the application to a production environment for use by users.


Embodiment of the invention describe methods and systems for verifying customer supplied financial account information verification using debit and credit transactions. These methods include electronically transmitting an electronic debit and credit transaction to the customer financial account, based on the customer supplied financial account information. The method also includes electronically transmitting a first statement descriptor, as part of at least one of the electronic debit transaction and the electronic credit transaction, that includes a first verification code. The method also includes electronically receiving, from the customer, a second verification code, and comparing, by the computer system, the transmitted first verification code with the received second verification code with respect to each other. The method also includes verifying, by the computer system, the customer supplied financial account information based on the comparison of the verification codes.

Loading HSBC collaborators
Loading HSBC collaborators