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Neitzel D.K.,AVO Training Institute Inc. | Simon M.E.,Madison Metropolitan Sewerage District | Widup R.,Shermco Industries | Schuerger R.J.,HP Critical Facilities Services
IEEE Industry Applications Magazine | Year: 2015

This article provides an overview of the IEEE standards that address the operations, management, maintenance, and safety of industrial and commercial power systems. Similar papers were presented at the IEEE Industry Applications Society (IAS) Electrical Safety Workshop in 2011 and the IEEE IAS Pulp and Paper Industry Conference (PPIC) in 2012. The IEEE 3007 series is part of the overall reorganization of the IEEE Color Book series. This series is derived from IEEE Standard 902-1998, [2] Guide for Maintenance, Operation, and Safety of Industrial and Commercial Power Systems, also known as the Yellow Book, and includes updated material and information. The IEEE 3007 series is divided into three individual dot standards: © 2015 IEEE.


Arno R.,Exelis | Dowling N.,MTechnology | Fairfax S.,MTechnology | Schuerger R.J.,HP Critical Facilities Services | And 2 more authors.
IEEE Transactions on Industry Applications | Year: 2015

Reliability-Centered Maintenance (RCM) is a proven technology to optimize the maintenance processes and another logical step in improving the overall performance and reliability of the critical facility while reducing the total cost of ownership. This paper will introduce RCM and use an automatic transfer switch and a standby generator to back up utility power as the example system to demonstrate the RCM process. © 1972-2012 IEEE.


Neitzel D.K.,AVO Training Institute Inc. | Cook C.J.,S and C Electrical Company | Simon M.E.,Madison Metropolitan Sewerage District | Schuerger R.J.,HP Critical Facilities Services | Widup R.,Shermco Industries
Conference Record of the 2011 IEEE IAS Electrical Safety Workshop, ESW 2011 | Year: 2011

IEEE Std. 902, Guide for Maintenance, Operation, and Safety of Industrial and Commercial Power Systems, also known as the IEEE Yellow Book, has been an excellent resource for engineering, management, safety professionals, and maintenance personnel since it was published in 1998. This presentation will provide an overview of how this IEEE standard has been revised for those who are responsible for the operation, management, maintenance, and safety of industrial and commercial electrical power systems. The entire IEEE Color Book series is in the process of being revised and reorganized into numerous "dot" standards, under the 3000 series of standards, with the Yellow Book being divided into three such "dot" standards. The new "dot" standards for operations and management, maintenance, and safety are: • 3007.1, Recommended Practice for the Operation and Management of Industrial and Commercial Power Systems • 3007.2, Recommended Practice for the Maintenance of Industrial and Commercial Power Systems • 3007.3, Recommended Practice for Electrical Safety in Industrial and Commercial Power Systems This paper and presentation will provide an overview of the IEEE Color Book Reorganization effort, as well as some specific information on IEEE 3007.1, 3007.2, and 3007.3. © 2011 IEEE.


Neitzel D.K.,AVO Training Institute Inc. | Simon M.E.,Madison Metropolitan Sewerage District | Widup R.,Shermco Industries | Schuerger R.J.,HP Critical Facilities Services
Conference Record - Industrial and Commercial Power Systems Technical Conference | Year: 2014

IEEE Std. 902-1998, Guide for Maintenance, Operation, and Safety of Industrial and Commercial Power Systems, also known as the IEEE Yellow Book, has been an excellent resource for management, safety professionals, and maintenance personnel since it was published in 1998. IEEE Std. 3007.1-2010 Recommended Practice for the Operation and Management of Industrial and Commercial Power Systems provides a recommended practice for the operation and management of industrial and commercial power systems. IEEE Std. 3007.2-2010 Recommended Practice for the Maintenance of Industrial and Commercial Power Systems provides a recommended practice for the maintenance of industrial and commercial power systems. IEEE Std. 3007.3-2012 Recommended Practice for Electrical Safety of Industrial and Commercial Power Systems provides a recommended practice for electrical safety of industrial and commercial power systems. This reorganization of IEEE Std. 902-1998 into individual technical "dot" standards makes it more user friendly for those involved in industrial and commercial electrical power systems, and it is especially helpful for new engineers who may not yet have the field experiences within the electrical power field of study. © 2014 IEEE.


Anthony M.,University of Michigan | Arno R.,HP Critical Facilities Services | Saba P.S.,HP Critical Facilities Services | Schuerger R.,HP Critical Facilities Services | Beirne M.,DLB Associates
IEEE Industry Applications Magazine | Year: 2013

At the request of the U.S. Homeland Security Department in 2005, the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) developed the first leading practice criterion for building premises wiring in emergency management facilities. These criteria initially appeared in the 2008 National Electrical Code (NEC) as a new section?Article 708: Critical Operations Power Systems (COPS). Article 708 establishes minimum design, commissioning, and maintenance requirements for facilities with engineering documentation that identifies them as designated critical operations areas (DCOAs). One of the key features of Article 708 is the application of quantitative methods for evaluating risk and conveying the results into a power system design that is scaled according to hazards present in any given emergency management district. These methods employ classical lumped parameter modeling of power chain architectures and can be applied to any type of critical facility, whether it is a stand-alone structure, or a portion of stand-alone structure, such as a police station or government center. This article will provide a risk assessment roadmap for one of the most common critical facilities that should be designated as COPS per NEC 708?a 911 call center (the facility that receives and routes the 911 calls to the police or fire departments). The existing methods of reliability engineering will be used in the risk assessment. © 2013 IEEE.


Salim M.,HP Critical Facilities Services | Tozer R.,HP Critical Facilities Services
ASHRAE Transactions | Year: 2010

This paper presents a summary of the energy audit and optimization studies conducted on more than 40 data centers. Comparison of data center energy efficiency metrics is presented. Those metrics include energy utilization metrics such as the Power Usage Effectiveness (PUE), Data Center infrastructure Efficiency (DCiE), mechanical PUE, electrical PUE and thermal or air management metrics such as bypass and recirculation air flow ratios. Additionally, percentages of cooling system, fans, UPS losses, and lighting to total data center power were analyzed and presented. The impact of climate zone as well as the operational load density compared to design load density were considered as well. These metrics incorporate and integrate together the major factors that decrease the effectiveness of computer room air cooling and the entire data center infrastructure. The energy utilization metrics determine the extent of the efficiencies of the data center supporting mechanical and electrical infrastructures. Interestingly, the database indicated that small data centers [Raised Floor Area (RFA) <10,000 ft2] or corporate data centers have higher average PUE than the larger ones. Small data centers were observed to have partially populated IT equipment racks and floors, oversized and aging cooling systems, higher levels of air mixing (recirculation and bypass air) in the raised floor areas, no implementation of free cooling, low UPS load factor, and no direct cooperation between the IT and the facilities departments. However, enterprise data centers were observed to implement more energy saving techniques such as "free cooling" as well as higher level of cooperation between IT and facilities. Many of those large data centers were also observed to participate in various professional IT and facilities organizations' seminars to stay informed about new advances in their field as well as industry best practices. ©2010 ASHRAE.


Siu S.K.,HP Critical Facilities Services | Lopopolo J.,HP Critical Facilities Services
Conference Record - Industrial and Commercial Power Systems Technical Conference | Year: 2011

Mission Critical Applications for Data Centers, Financial Institutions, Telecommunication and Government typically have Generators and UPS (Uninterruptible Power Supplies) providing backup power to keep their Critical IT (Information Technology) loads online. Tier I and Tier II topologies according to ANSI/TIA-942 are very simple and straightforward with no redundancy or single distribution path with redundant components. Tier III and Tier IV configurations are increasing complex with multiple distribution paths, concurrent maintainability and multiple active paths. This paper will explore the high level compatibility, sizing and design considerations for Generators and UPSs in Tiers I, II, III & IV topologies. © 2011 IEEE.


Lui Y.Y.,HP Critical Facilities Services
ASHRAE Transactions | Year: 2010

Applying airside and waterside economizer to data center projects requires additional consideration to fulfill the unique design criteria that is not common to other commercial building types. Waterside economizer design considerations include proper equipment sizing, cooling tower freeze protection, pump design for parallel and series configuration, and control strategies for system stability. Airside economizer design considerations include humidification, particulate contamination, gaseous contamination, fire prevention, smoke detection, supply and return air balancing. ©2010 ASHRAE.

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