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Monroy-Torres R.,University of Guanajuato | Naves-Sanchez J.,Hospital Materno Infantil de la SSG | Ortega-Garcia J.A.,Hospital Universitario Virgen Of La Arrixaca Murcia
Revista de Investigacion Clinica | Year: 2012

Background. Morbidity and mortality rates are higher among preterm infants due to physiological immaturity and greater growth demands. Nutritional intervention contributes to proper weight gain, which translates into better growth and neurological development, and prevents the onset of metabolic complications. The effect of breastfeeding duration was studied in the analytic profile at the end of the first six months of life. Objective. To describe the nutritional and metabolic markers effect in preterm infants at the end of the first semester of life. Material and methods. We performed an analytical, transversal and comparative study in 100 preterm infants, 30 to 36 weeks gestational age. Measures for weight, length and head circumference at birth were taken from the subjects' clinical files. A follow-up conducted at 6 to 9 months of age evaluated the same nutritional indicators (weight, length, head circumference) and compared them with values at birth and recommendations. Metabolic indicators (glucose, hemoglobin, cholesterol, triglycerides, insulin, urea, creatinine, gamma-glutamyl-transferase and alkaline phosphatase) were compared with the recommendations. Follow-up study in 100 preterm infants (30 to 36 weeks gestational age). Weight, length and head circumference were measured at birth and 6 to 9 months later. We measured analytic parameters related to metabolic syndrome (glucose, hemoglobin, cholesterol, triglycerides, insulin, urea, creatinine, gamma-glutamyl transferase and alkaline phosphatase). Confusing factors like income level and access to public services were also studied. Results. The mean age at follow-up was 7.3 ± 1.4 months. Levels of hemoglobin, creatinine and urea showed significant differences with regard to reference values (Wilcoxon ranks test, < 0.05). The average duration of breastfeeding was 4.3 months. The mean age at follow-up was 7.3 ± 1.4 months. Risk factors for hypercholesterolemia, as well as levels of hemoglobin, creatinine and urea showed significant differences with regard to reference values (Wilcoxon ranks test, < 0.05). Conclusions. Premature infants showed deficiencies in weight gain. Biochemical parameters could reflect metabolic risk, therefore we recommend prolonging breastfeeding as well as extending the follow-up of these infants for monitoring their growth and development once out of the hospital. Source

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