Entity

Time filter

Source Type

Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Spain

Villanueva V.,Polytechnic University of Valencia | Serratosa J.M.,Hospital Universitario Fundacion Jimenez Diaz | Guillamon E.,Polytechnic University of Valencia | Garces M.,Polytechnic University of Valencia | And 14 more authors.
Epilepsy Research | Year: 2014

Background: Eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL) is a new antiepileptic drug (AED) licensed as adjunctive therapy in adults with partial-onset or focal seizures. Objective: To evaluate in a clinical practice setting the long-term efficacy and safety of ESL in patients with focal seizures. Methods: ESLIBASE was a retrospective study that included all patients with focal seizures who started ESL between January 2010 and July 2012 at 12 hospitals. ESL was prescribed individually according to real-life practice. Efficacy and safety were evaluated over 1 year. Switching from carbamazepine (CBZ) and oxcarbazepine (OXC) was assessed. Results: Three hundred and twenty-seven patients were included; 78% of patients were taking ≥2 other AEDs at baseline. Most (87%) began ESL because of poor seizure control and13% because of adverse events (AEs) with CBZ or OXC. After 1 year, 237 patients (72.4%) remained on ESL. At 3, 6 and 12 months, the responder rate was 46.3%, 57.9%, and 52.5%, and 21.0%, 28.0%, and 25.3% of patients were seizure free. The responder rate significantly increased when ESL was combined with a non-sodium channel-targeting drug (non-SC drug) (66.7%) versus an SC drug (47.7%; p< 0.001). At 12 months, 40.7% of patients had ≥1 AE; AEs led to treatment discontinuation in 16.2%. Dizziness, nausea, and somnolence were the most common AEs. The tolerability profile improved in >50% of the patients who switched from CBZ or OXC to ESL because of AEs. Conclusions: ESL was well tolerated and effective in a real-world setting over 1 year. Side-effect profile improved when OXC and CBZ recipients were switched to ESL. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.


Lorente L.,Hospital Universitario Of Canarias | Martin M.M.,Hospital Universitario Nuestra Senora Candelaria | Almeida T.,University of La Laguna | Hernandez M.,University of La Laguna | And 5 more authors.
Critical Care | Year: 2015

Introduction: Substance P (SP) is a member of the tachykinin family of neuropeptides, which are widely distributed throughout the central nervous system (CNS) and actively involved in inflammatory processes. SP is released early following acute injury to the CNS, promoting a neurogenic inflammatory response characterized by an increase in the permeability of the blood-brain barrier and the development of vasogenic edema. High levels of SP could lead to an exacerbated inflammatory response that could be fatal for patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Thus, the main goal of the present study was to determine whether serum SP levels are associated with injury severity and mortality in patients with severe TBI. Methods: This multicenter, observational, prospective study was carried out in six Spanish intensive care units and included patients with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores ≤8. Patients with an Injury Severity Score ≥10 in non-cranial aspects were excluded. Blood samples were collected on day 1 of TBI to measure serum SP levels. The endpoint was 30-day mortality. Results: We found higher serum SP levels (P =0.002) in non-surviving patients (n =27) than in surviving patients (n =73). The area under the curve for serum SP levels with regard to predicting 30-day mortality was 0.70 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.60 to 0.79; P <0.001). Survival analysis showed that patients with serum SP levels >299 pg/ml had higher 30-day mortality than patients with lower levels (hazard ratio =3.7; 95% CI, 1.75 to 7.94; P <0.001). Multiple binomial logistic regression analysis showed that serum SP levels >299 pg/ml were associated with 30-day mortality when we controlled for APACHE II score and Marshall computed tomography lesion classification (odds ratio (OR) =5.97; 95% CI, 1.432 to 24.851; P =0.01) and for GCS score and age (OR =5.71; 95% CI, 1.461 to 22.280; P =0.01). We found a negative association between serum SP levels and GCS score (Spearman's ρ = -0.22; P =0.03). Conclusions: We report, for the first time to our knowledge, that serum SP levels were associated with injury severity and mortality in patients with severe TBI. These results open the possibility that SP antagonists may be useful in the treatment of patients with severe TBI. © 2015 Lorente et al.; licensee BioMed Central.


Lorente L.,Hospital Universitario Of Canarias | Martin M.M.,Hospital Universitario Nuestra Senora Candelaria | Borreguero-Leon J.M.,Hospital Universitario Of Canarias | Barrios Y.,Hospital Universitario Of Canarias | And 5 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2015

Objective: Two studies have reported that patients with the 4G/4G genotype of the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) genetic polymorphism had higher plasma PAI-1 concentrations and higher risk of death than those with the 4G/5G or 5G/5G genotypes; one study involved 175 children with meningococcal disease, and the other included 88 adult patients with septic shock. Thus, the objective of this study was to determine whether there is an association between carriage of the 4G/4G genotype, plasma PAI-1 concentrations and mortality in a large series of adult septic patients. Methods: An observational, prospective, multicenter study was carried out in six Spanish Intensive Care Units including severe septic patients. We determined the PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism and plasma PAI-1 concentrations in all patients. The end-points of the study were 30-day and 6-month mortality. Results: We included a total of 260 patients, 82 (31.5%) with 4G/4G, 126 (48.5%) with 4G/5G and 52 (20.0%) with 5G/5G genotype. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the 4G/4G genotype was associated with higher mortality at 30 days (Odds Ratio = 1.95; 95% CI = 1.063-3.561; p = 0.03) and at 6 months (Odds Ratio = 2.19; 95% CI = 1.221-3.934; p = 0.01), and that higher plasma PAI-1 concentrations were associated with higher mortality at 30 days (Odds Ratio = 1.01; 95% CI = 1.002-1.022; p = 0.02) at 6 months (Odds Ratio = 1.01; 95% CI = 1.003-1.023; p = 0.01). Multivariate linear regression analysis showed that increased plasma PAI-1 concentrations were associated with the PAI-1 4G/4G genotype (regression coefficient = 4.82; 95% CI = 3.227 to 6.406; p<0.001). Conclusions: The major findings of our study, to our knowledge the largest series reporting data about 4G/5G polymorphism of the PAI-1 gene, plasma PAI-1 concentrations and mortality in septic patients, were that septic patients with the 4G/4G genotype had higher plasma PAI-1 concentrations and higher risk of death than those with 4G/5G or 5G/5G genotypes. © 2015 Lorente et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.


Lorente L.,Hospital Universitario Of Canarias | Martin M.M.,Hospital Universitario Nuestra Senora Candelaria | Abreu-Gonzalez P.,University of La Laguna | de la Cruz T.,University of La Laguna | And 6 more authors.
Journal of Critical Care | Year: 2015

Objective: Melatonin in septic patients has been scarcely explored and only in studies of small sample size (maximum 20 patients). Thus, the objective of this study was to determine whether serum melatonin levels are associated with severity, oxidant and inflammatory state, and mortality in a large series of septic patients. Methods: A prospective, observational, multicenter study was performed in 6 Spanish intensive care units with 201 severe septic patients. Serum levels of melatonin were measured at moment of severe sepsis diagnosis. The end point was 30-day mortality. Results: Non-surviving patients (n = 71) showed higher serum melatonin levels (P < .001) than survivors (n = 130). Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that serum melatonin levels were associated with 30-day mortality (odds ratio, 1.022; 95% confidence interval, 1.001-1.043; P = .04), controlling for serum tumor necrosis factor-α levels, serum interleukin 6 levels and age. Serum melatonin levels were positively associated with serum levels of malondialdehyde as biomarker of oxidative stress, interleukin-6 and lactate, and with SOFA score. Conclusions: The novel finding of our study was that serum melatonin levels are associated with mortality in septic patients. © 2015 Elsevier Inc.


Lorente L.,Hospital Universitario Of Canarias | Martin M.,Hospital Universitario Nuestra Senora Candelaria | Plasencia F.,Hospital Universitario Of Canarias | Sole-Violan J.,Hospital Universitario Dr Negrin | And 9 more authors.
Critical Care | Year: 2013

Introduction: Previous studies have found higher circulating levels of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 in nonsurviving septic patients than in surviving septic patients, and an association between the 372 T/C genetic polymorphism of TIMP-1 and the risk of developing certain diseases. However, the relationship between genetic polymorphisms of TIMP-1, circulating TIMP-1 levels and survival in patients with severe sepsis has not been examined, and this was the objective of the study.Methods: This multicentre, prospective, observational study was carried out in six Spanish ICUs. We determined the 372 T/C genetic polymorphism of TIMP-1 (rs4898), serum levels of TIMP-1, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, MMP-10, TNFα, IL-10 and plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). Survival at 30 days from ICU admission was the endpoint assessed. The association between continuous variables was carried out using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient or Spearman's rho coefficient. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was applied to determine the association between the 372 T/C genetic polymorphism and survival 30 days from ICU admission.Results: Of 275 patients with severe sepsis, 80 had genotype CC, 55 had genotype CT and 140 had genotype TT of the 372 T/C genetic polymorphism of TIMP-1. Patients with the T allele showed higher serum levels of TIMP-1 than patients without the T allele (P = 0.004). Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the T allele was associated with higher mortality at 30 days (odds ratio = 2.08; 95% confidence interval = 1.06 to 4.09; P = 0.03). Survival analysis showed that patients with the T allele presented lower 30-day survival than patients without the T allele (χ2= 5.77; P = 0.016). We found an association between TIMP-1 levels and levels of MMP-9 (ρ = -0.19; P = 0.002), MMP-10 (ρ = 0.55; P <0.001), TNFα (ρ = 0.56; P <0.001), IL-10 (ρ = 0.48; P <0.001) and PAI-1 (ρ = 0.49; P <0.001).Conclusion: The novel findings of our study are that septic patients with the T allele in the 372 T/C genetic polymorphism of TIMP-1 showed higher serum TIMP-1 levels and lower survival rate. The determination of the 372 T/C genetic polymorphism of TIMP-1 thus has prognostic implications and could help in the selection of patients who may benefit from modulation of the MMP/TIMP balance. © 2013 Lorente et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

Discover hidden collaborations