Hospital Oncologico

Quito, Ecuador

Hospital Oncologico

Quito, Ecuador

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Alemany L.,Lhospitalet Of Llobregat | Alemany L.,CIBER ISCIII | Saunier M.,Lhospitalet Of Llobregat | Tinoco L.,Hospital Oncologico | And 36 more authors.
European Journal of Cancer | Year: 2014

Aim: This work describes the human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence and the HPV type distribution in a large series of vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia (VAIN) grades 2/3 and vaginal cancer worldwide. Methods: We analysed 189 VAIN 2/3 and 408 invasive vaginal cancer cases collected from 31 countries from 1986 to 2011. After histopathological evaluation of sectioned formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples, HPV DNA detection and typing was performed using the SPF-10/DNA enzyme immunoassay (DEIA)/LiPA25 system (version 1). A subset of 146 vaginal cancers was tested for p16INK4a expression, a cellular surrogate marker for HPV transformation. Prevalence ratios were estimated using multivariate Poisson regression with robust variance. Results: HPV DNA was detected in 74% (95% confidence interval (CI): 70-78%) of invasive cancers and in 96% (95% CI: 92-98%) of VAIN 2/3. Among cancers, the highest detection rates were observed in warty-basaloid subtype of squamous cell carcinomas, and in younger ages. Concerning the type-specific distribution, HPV16 was the most frequently type detected in both precancerous and cancerous lesions (59%). p16INK4a overexpression was found in 87% of HPV DNA positive vaginal cancer cases. Conclusions: HPV was identified in a large proportion of invasive vaginal cancers and in almost all VAIN 2/3. HPV16 was the most common type detected. A large impact in the reduction of the burden of vaginal neoplastic lesions is expected among vaccinated cohorts. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Alemany L.,Institute Catala dOncologia | Alemany L.,CIBER ISCIII | Alemany L.,Lhospitalet Of Llobregat | Cubilla A.,National University of Asunción | And 42 more authors.
European Urology | Year: 2016

Background Invasive penile cancer is a rare disease with an approximately 22 000 cases per year. The incidence is higher in less developed countries, where penile cancer can account for up to 10% of cancers among men in some parts of Africa, South America, and Asia. Objective To describe the human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA prevalence, HPV type distribution, and detection of markers of viral activity (ie, E6∗I mRNA and p16INK4a) in a series of invasive penile cancers and penile high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HGSILs) from 25 countries. A total of 85 penile HGSILs and 1010 penile invasive cancers diagnosed from 1983 to 2011 were included. Design, setting, and participants After histopathologic evaluation of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples, HPV DNA detection and genotyping were performed using the SPF-10/DEIA/LiPA25 system, v.1 (Laboratory Biomedical Products, Rijswijk, The Netherlands). HPV DNA-positive cases were additionally tested for oncogene E6∗I mRNA and all cases for p16INK4a expression, a surrogate marker of oncogenic HPV activity. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis HPV DNA prevalence and type distributions were estimated. Results and limitations HPV DNA was detected in 33.1% of penile cancers (95% confidence interval [CI], 30.2-36.1) and in 87.1% of HGSILs (95% CI, 78.0-93.4). The warty-basaloid histologic subtype showed the highest HPV DNA prevalence. Among cancers, statistically significant differences in prevalence were observed only by geographic region and not by period or by age at diagnosis. HPV16 was the most frequent HPV type detected in both HPV-positive cancers (68.7%) and HGSILs (79.6%). HPV6 was the second most common type in invasive cancers (3.7%). The p16INK4a upregulation and mRNA detection in addition to HPV DNA positivity were observed in 69.3% of HGSILs, and at least one of these HPV activity markers was detected in 85.3% of cases. In penile cancers, these figures were 22.0% and 27.1%, respectively. Conclusions About a third to a fourth of penile cancers were related to HPV when considering HPV DNA detection alone or adding an HPV activity marker, respectively. The observed HPV type distribution reinforces the potential benefit of current and new HPV vaccines in the reduction of HPV-related penile neoplastic lesions. Patient summary About one-third to one-quarter of penile cancers were related to human papillomavirus (HPV). The observed HPV type distribution reinforces the potential benefit of current and new HPV vaccines to prevent HPV-related penile neoplastic lesions. © 2015 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Alemany L.,Lhospitalet Of Llobregat | Alemany L.,CIBER ISCIII | Saunier M.,Lhospitalet Of Llobregat | Tinoco L.,Hospital Oncologico | And 37 more authors.
European Journal of Cancer | Year: 2014

This work describes the human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence and the HPV type distribution in a large series of vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia (VAIN) grades 2/3 and vaginal cancer worldwide. Methods We analysed 189 VAIN 2/3 and 408 invasive vaginal cancer cases collected from 31 countries from 1986 to 2011. After histopathological evaluation of sectioned formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples, HPV DNA detection and typing was performed using the SPF-10/DNA enzyme immunoassay (DEIA)/LiPA25 system (version 1). A subset of 146 vaginal cancers was tested for p16INK4a expression, a cellular surrogate marker for HPV transformation. Prevalence ratios were estimated using multivariate Poisson regression with robust variance. Results HPV DNA was detected in 74% (95% confidence interval (CI): 70-78%) of invasive cancers and in 96% (95% CI: 92-98%) of VAIN 2/3. Among cancers, the highest detection rates were observed in warty-basaloid subtype of squamous cell carcinomas, and in younger ages. Concerning the type-specific distribution, HPV16 was the most frequently type detected in both precancerous and cancerous lesions (59%). p16INK4a overexpression was found in 87% of HPV DNA positive vaginal cancer cases. Conclusions HPV was identified in a large proportion of invasive vaginal cancers and in almost all VAIN 2/3. HPV16 was the most common type detected. A large impact in the reduction of the burden of vaginal neoplastic lesions is expected among vaccinated cohorts. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.


Alemany L.,CIBER ISCIII | Alvarado-Cabrero I.,Mexican Oncology Hospital | Salmeron J.,Mexican Oncology Hospital | Shin H.-R.,National Cancer Center | And 25 more authors.
International Journal of Cancer | Year: 2015

Knowledge about human papillomaviruses (HPV) types involved in anal cancers in some world regions is scanty. Here, we describe the HPV DNA prevalence and type distribution in a series of invasive anal cancers and anal intraepithelial neoplasias (AIN) grades 2/3 from 24 countries. We analyzed 43 AIN 2/3 cases and 496 anal cancers diagnosed from 1986 to 2011. After histopathological evaluation of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples, HPV DNA detection and genotyping was performed using SPF-10/DEIA/LiPA25 system (version 1). A subset of 116 cancers was further tested for p16INK4a expression, a cellular surrogate marker for HPV-associated transformation. Prevalence ratios were estimated using multivariate Poisson regression with robust variance in the anal cancer data set. HPV DNA was detected in 88.3% of anal cancers (95% confidence interval [CI]: 85.1-91.0%) and in 95.3% of AIN 2/3 (95% CI: 84.2-99.4%). Among cancers, the highest prevalence was observed in warty-basaloid subtype of squamous cell carcinomas, in younger patients and in North American geographical region. There were no statistically significant differences in prevalence by gender. HPV16 was the most frequent HPV type detected in both cancers (80.7%) and AIN 2/3 lesions (75.4%). HPV18 was the second most common type in invasive cancers (3.6%). p16INK4a overexpression was found in 95% of HPV DNA-positive anal cancers. In view of the results of HPV DNA and high proportion of p16INK4a overexpression, infection by HPV is most likely to be a necessary cause for anal cancers in both men and women. The large contribution of HPV16 reinforces the potential impact of HPV vaccines in the prevention of these lesions. What's new? Human papillomavirus (HPV) is linked to anal cancer through high HPV DNA-detection rates. Here, in one of the largest international studies to date, HPV DNA was detected in more than 88% of anal cancers and more than 95% of anal intraepithelial neoplasias grades 2/3. HPV16 was the most frequently detected virus type, followed by HPV18. Overexpression of p16INK4a, a surrogate marker for HPV-associated transformation, was found in 95% of HPV-positive anal cancers. The data implicate HPV as a causative factor in anal cancer. © 2014 UICC.


PubMed | WestMead Hospital, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Lhospitalet Of Llobregat, Laboratorio Of Anatomia Patologica Del Hospital Of La Mujer and 21 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: European journal of cancer (Oxford, England : 1990) | Year: 2014

This work describes the human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence and the HPV type distribution in a large series of vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia (VAIN) grades 2/3 and vaginal cancer worldwide.We analysed 189 VAIN 2/3 and 408 invasive vaginal cancer cases collected from 31 countries from 1986 to 2011. After histopathological evaluation of sectioned formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples, HPV DNA detection and typing was performed using the SPF-10/DNA enzyme immunoassay (DEIA)/LiPA25 system (version 1). A subset of 146 vaginal cancers was tested for p16(INK4a) expression, a cellular surrogate marker for HPV transformation. Prevalence ratios were estimated using multivariate Poisson regression with robust variance.HPV DNA was detected in 74% (95% confidence interval (CI): 70-78%) of invasive cancers and in 96% (95% CI: 92-98%) of VAIN 2/3. Among cancers, the highest detection rates were observed in warty-basaloid subtype of squamous cell carcinomas, and in younger ages. Concerning the type-specific distribution, HPV16 was the most frequently type detected in both precancerous and cancerous lesions (59%). p16(INK4a) overexpression was found in 87% of HPV DNA positive vaginal cancer cases.HPV was identified in a large proportion of invasive vaginal cancers and in almost all VAIN 2/3. HPV16 was the most common type detected. A large impact in the reduction of the burden of vaginal neoplastic lesions is expected among vaccinated cohorts.


Bernet L.,Hospital Lluis Alcanyis | Bernet L.,Hospital Of La Ribera | Cano R.,Hospital Lluis Alcanyis | Martinez M.,Hospital Of La Ribera | And 13 more authors.
Histopathology | Year: 2011

Aims: Standardization of the sentinel node (SN) as a diagnostic tool has not yet been achieved, because the protocol for histopathological study is highly variable between centres. We compared the results of a new method with conventional histological tests and evaluated its feasibility for intra-operative evaluation, and propose it as a method to standardize the sentinel node evaluation procedure. Methods and results: Trial 1 included 181 cases; in parallel, 2-mm-thick sections of the SN were processed alternately for histological analysis and for the one-step nucleic acid amplification (OSNA) procedure. A final concordance of 99.45% was observed in the first trial of our study. For trial 2, the timing of every procedural step was recorded in an electronic database in order to discern the time spent for each step, the total SN evaluation time and to identify areas of improvement. In the second trial, after a learning period and feedback on data recorded, we spent a mean of 31min for the entire SN evaluation procedure. Conclusion: Our multi-centric trial using the OSNA assay for sentinel node evaluation in breast cancer demonstrates that this is a highly sensitive, specific and reproducible technique that allows for standardization of the SN diagnostic procedure, a necessary, and until now unresolved, issue. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Limited.

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