Munich Schwabing Hospital

München, Germany

Munich Schwabing Hospital

München, Germany
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Lamoury F.M.J.,University of New South Wales | Soker A.,University of New South Wales | Martinez D.,University of New South Wales | Hajarizadeh B.,University of New South Wales | And 13 more authors.
Journal of Clinical Virology | Year: 2017

Background Simple, affordable diagnostic tools are essential to facilitate global hepatitis C virus (HCV) elimination efforts. Objectives This study evaluated the clinical performance of core antigen (HCVcAg) assay from plasma samples to monitor HCV treatment efficacy and HCV viral recurrence. Study design Plasma samples from a study of response-guided pegylated-interferon/ribavirin therapy for people who inject drugs with chronic HCV genotype 2/3 infection were assessed for HCV RNA (AmpliPrep/COBAS Taqman assay, Roche) and HCVcAg (ARCHITECT HCV Ag, Abbott Diagnostics) during and after therapy. The sensitivity and specificity of the HCVcAg assay was compared to the HCV RNA assay (gold standard). Results A total of 335 samples from 92 enrolled participants were assessed (mean 4 time-points per participant). At baseline, end of treatment response (ETR) and sustained virological response (SVR) visits, the sensitivity of the HCVcAg assay with quantifiable HCV RNA threshold was 94% (95% CI: 88%, 98%), 56% (21%, 86%) and 100%, respectively. The specificity was between 98 to 100% for all time-points assessed. HCVcAg accurately detected all six participants with viral recurrence, demonstrating 100% sensitivity and specificity. One participant with detectable (non-quantifiable) HCV RNA and non-reactive HCVcAg at SVR12 subsequently cleared HCV RNA at SVR24. Conclusions HCVcAg demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity for detection of pre-treatment and post-treatment viraemia. This study indicates that confirmation of active HCV infection, including recurrent viraemia, by HCVcAg is possible. Reduced on-treatment sensitivity of HCVcAg may be a clinical advantage given the moves toward simplification of monitoring schedules. © 2017


Preissler G.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | Massberg S.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | Massberg S.,TU Munich | Eichhorn M.E.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | And 4 more authors.
European Surgical Research | Year: 2010

Background: Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury plays a pivotal role in the development of graft pancreatitis, with ischemia time representing one of its crucial factors. However, it is unclear, whether exocrine and endocrine tissue experience similar inflammatory responses during pancreas transplantation (PTx). This study evaluated inflammatory susceptibilities of islets of Langerhans (ILH) and exocrine tissue after different preservation periods during early reperfusion. Methods: PTx was performed in rats following 2 h (2h-I) or 18 h (18h-I) preservation. Leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions (LEI) were analyzed in venules of acinar tissue and ILH in vivo over 2 h reperfusion. Nontransplanted animals served as controls. Tissue samples were analyzed by histomorphometry. Results: In exocrine venules leukocyte rolling predominated in the 2h-I group. In the 18h-I group, additionally, high numbers of adherent leukocytes were found. Histology revealed significant edema formation and leukocyte extravasation in the 18h-I group. Notably, LEI in postcapillary venules of ILH were significantly lower. Leukocyte rolling was only moderately enhanced and few leukocytes were found adherent. Histology revealed minor leukocyte extravasation. Conclusion: Ischemia time contributes decisively to the extent of the I/R-injury in PTx. However, ILH have a significantly lower susceptibility towards I/R, even when inflammatory reactions in adjacent exocrine tissue are evident. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.


Preissler G.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | Eichhorn M.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | Waldner H.,Munich Schwabing Hospital | Winter H.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | And 2 more authors.
Pancreas | Year: 2012

OBJECTIVES: After pancreas transplantation (PTx), early capillary malperfusion and leukocyte recruitment indicate the manifestation of severe ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI). Oscillatory blood-flow redistribution (intermittent capillary perfusion, IP), leading to an overall decrease in erythrocyte flux, precedes complete microvascular perfusion failure with persistent blood flow cessation. We addressed the role of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) for leukocyte-endothelial interactions (LEIs) after PTx and evaluated the contribution of IP and malperfusion. METHODS: Pancreas transplantation was performed in rats after 18-hour preservation, receiving either isotype-matched IgG or monoclonal anti-ICAM-1 antibodies (10 mg/kg intravenously) once before reperfusion. Leukocyte-endothelial interaction, IP, erythrocyte flux, and functional capillary density, respectively, were examined in vivo during 2-hour reperfusion. Nontransplanted animals served as controls. Tissue samples were analyzed by histomorphometry. RESULTS: In grafts of IgG-treated animals, IP was encountered already at an early stage after reperfusion and steadily increased over 2 hours, whereas erythrocyte flux declined continuously. In contrast, inhibition of ICAM-1 significantly improved erythrocyte flux and delayed IP appearance by 2 hours. Further, anti-ICAM-1 significantly reduced LEI and leukocyte tissue infiltration when compared to IgG; edema development was less pronounced in response to anti-ICAM-1 monoclonal antibody. CONCLUSION: Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 blockade significantly attenuates IRI via immediate reduction of LEI and concomitant improvement of capillary perfusion patterns, emphasizing its central role during IRI in PTx. Copyright © 2012 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

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