Hospital Madrid Norte Sanchinarro

Madrid, Spain

Hospital Madrid Norte Sanchinarro

Madrid, Spain
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Bellmunt J.,University of the Sea | Trigo J.M.,Hospital Clinico Virgen Of La Victoria | Calvo E.,Hospital Madrid Norte Sanchinarro | Carles J.,University of the Sea | And 6 more authors.
The Lancet Oncology | Year: 2010

Background: Maximum tolerated dose (MTD) chemotherapy followed by metronomic chemotherapy (low doses given on a frequent schedule) acts on tumour vascular endothelial cells by increasing the anti-tumour effect of anti-angiogenic agents. This multicentre, phase 2 study investigated the effectiveness of MTD gemcitabine combined with metronomic capecitabine plus the multikinase inhibitor sorafenib for the treatment of metastatic renal-cell carcinoma (RCC). Methods: Patients were enrolled at eight centres across Spain between Dec 13, 2006, and April 17, 2008. Patients were aged 18 years or older, had confirmed metastatic RCC with clear-cell histology, had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0 or 1, had not undergone previous therapy, and were unsuitable for, or intolerant to, immunotherapy. Treatment consisted of intravenous gemcitabine 1000 mg/m2 (days 1 and 8), oral capecitabine 500 mg/m2 twice a day (final dose after adjustment, days 1-14), and oral sorafenib 400 mg twice a day (days 1-21), for six cycles, followed by sorafenib monotherapy (at the investigator's discretion if clinical benefit was maintained). The primary endpoint was median progression-free survival (PFS) analysed in a population of all patients who received treatment. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00496301. Findings: 44 patients enrolled in the study, 40 of whom received treatment. Median PFS for these patients was 11·1 months (95% CI 7·9-17·1). A partial response was achieved in 20 patients, and stable disease in 17 patients. Most adverse events were grade 1 or 2. Grade 3 adverse events were fatigue or asthenia (n=9), hand-foot skin reaction (n=11), mucositis (n=3), diarrhoea (n=2), infection (n=2), and allergic reaction, hypertension, and rash (all n=1). Grade 3 haematological toxicity was noted in nine patients. One death due to pulmonary embolism was reported as grade 5 dyspnoea possibly related to study drug. Interpretation: PFS and response rates were greater than those previously observed with gemcitabine and capecitabine or sorafenib monotherapy in patients with metastatic RCC. Adverse events were manageable in most patients. These findings provide preliminary confirmation of the synergistic activity of the chemo-switch concept seen in preclinical studies, and merit further exploration. Funding: Spanish Oncology Genitourinary Group (SOGUG). © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.


Watters J.,Merck And Co. | Brooks D.,Merck And Co. | Brooks D.,Generation Health | Demuth T.,Merck And Co. | And 6 more authors.
Clinical Cancer Research | Year: 2011

Purpose: Investigate the efficacy and pharmacodynamic effects of MK-1775, a potent Wee1 inhibitor, in both monotherapy and in combination with gemcitabine (GEM) using a panel of p53-deficient and p53 wild-type human pancreatic cancer xenografts. Experimental Design: Nine individual patient-derived pancreatic cancer xenografts (6 with p53-deficient and 3 with p53 wild-type status) from the PancXenoBank collection at Johns Hopkins were treated with MK-1775, GEM, or GEM followed 24 hour later by MK-1775, for 4 weeks. Tumor growth rate/regressions were calculated on day 28. Target modulation was assessed by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Results: MK-1775 treatment led to the inhibition of Wee1 kinase and reduced inhibitory phosphorylation of its substrate Cdc2. MK-1775, when dosed with GEM, abrogated the checkpoint arrest to promote mitotic entry and facilitated tumor cell death as compared to control and GEM-treated tumors. MK-1775 monotherapy did not induce tumor regressions. However, the combination of GEM with MK-1775 produced robust antitumor activity and remarkably enhanced tumor regression response (4.01-fold) compared to GEM treatment in p53-deficient tumors. Tumor regrowth curves plotted after the drug treatment period suggest that the effect of the combination therapy is longer-lasting than that of GEM. None of the agents produced tumor regressions in p53 wild-type xenografts. Conclusions: These results indicate that MK-1775 selectively synergizes with GEM to achieve tumor regressions, selectively in p53-deficient pancreatic cancer xenografts. ©2011 AACR.


Brahmer J.,Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins | Reckamp K.L.,City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center | Baas P.,Netherlands Cancer Institute | Crino L.,University of Perugia | And 21 more authors.
New England Journal of Medicine | Year: 2015

BACKGROUND Patients with advanced squamous-cell non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have disease progression during or after first-line chemotherapy have limited treatment options. This randomized, open-label, international, phase 3 study evaluated the efficacy and safety of nivolumab, a fully human IgG4 programmed death 1 (PD-1) immune-checkpoint-inhibitor antibody, as compared with docetaxel in this patient population. METHODS We randomly assigned 272 patients to receive nivolumab, at a dose of 3 mg per kilogram of body weight every 2 weeks, or docetaxel, at a dose of 75 mg per square meter of body-surface area every 3 weeks. The primary end point was overall survival. RESULTS The median overall survival was 9.2 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 7.3 to 13.3) with nivolumab versus 6.0 months (95% CI, 5.1 to 7.3) with docetaxel. The risk of death was 41% lower with nivolumab than with docetaxel (hazard ratio, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.44 to 0.79; P<0.001). At 1 year, the overall survival rate was 42% (95% CI, 34 to 50) with nivolumab versus 24% (95% CI, 17 to 31) with docetaxel. The response rate was 20% with nivolumab versus 9% with docetaxel (P = 0.008). The median progression-free survival was 3.5 months with nivolumab versus 2.8 months with docetaxel (hazard ratio for death or disease progression, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.47 to 0.81; P<0.001). The expression of the PD-1 ligand (PD-L1) was neither prognostic nor predictive of benefit. Treatment-related adverse events of grade 3 or 4 were reported in 7% of the patients in the nivolumab group as compared with 55% of those in the docetaxel group. CONCLUSIONS Among patients with advanced, previously treated squamous-cell NSCLC, overall survival, response rate, and progression-free survival were significantly better with nivolumab than with docetaxel, regardless of PD-L1 expression level. Copyright © 2015 Massachusetts Medical Society.


Porta C.,University of Pavia | Calvo E.,Hospital Madrid Norte Sanchinarro | Climent M.A.,Instituto Valenciano Of Oncologia | Vaishampayan U.,Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute | And 10 more authors.
European Urology | Year: 2012

Background: Elderly patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) may require special treatment considerations, particularly when comorbidities are present. An understanding of the efficacy and safety of targeted agents in elderly patients with mRCC is essential to provide individualized therapy. Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of everolimus in elderly patients (those ≥65 and ≥70 yr of age) enrolled in RECORD-1. Design, setting, and participants: The multicenter randomized RECORD-1 phase 3 trial (Clinicaltrials.gov identifier, NCT00410124; http://www.clinicaltrials.gov) enrolled patients with mRCC who progressed during or within 6 mo of stopping sunitinib and/or sorafenib treatment (n = 416). Intervention: Everolimus 10 mg once daily (n = 277) or placebo (n = 139) plus best supportive care. Treatment was continued until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. Measurements: Median progression-free survival (PFS), median overall survival (OS), and time to deterioration in Karnofsky performance status (TTD-KPS) were assessed using the Kaplan-Meier method; the log-rank test was used to compare treatment arms. Other outcomes evaluated included reduction in tumor burden, overall response rate (ORR), and safety. Results and limitations: In RECORD-1, 36.8% of patients were ≥65 yr and 17.5% were ≥70 yr of age. PFS, OS, TTD-KPS, reduction in tumor burden, and ORR were similar in the elderly and the overall RECORD-1 population. Everolimus was generally well tolerated in elderly patients, and most adverse events were grade 1 or 2 in severity. The toxicity profile of everolimus was generally similar in older patients and the overall population; however, peripheral edema, cough, rash, and diarrhea were reported more frequently in the elderly regardless of treatment. The retrospective nature of the analyses was the major limitation. Conclusions: Everolimus is effective and tolerable in elderly patients with mRCC. When selecting targeted therapies in these patients, the specific toxicity profile of each agent and any patient comorbidities should be considered. © 2011 European Association of Urology.


Bracarda S.,Instituto Toscano Tumori ITT | Hutson T.E.,Us Oncology Baylor Sammons Cancer Center | Porta C.,University of Pavia | Figlin R.A.,Cedars Sinai Medical Center | And 8 more authors.
British Journal of Cancer | Year: 2012

Background: A relevant percentage of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma develop intolerance to vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (VEGFr-TKIs) and require careful selection of subsequent treatment. This retrospective analysis evaluated the safety and efficacy of everolimus in patients enrolled in the phase-III RECORD-1 trial who discontinued previous VEGFr-TKI therapy because of toxicity. Methods: Patients with an adverse event (AE) as their primary reason for discontinuation of previous VEGFr-TKI therapy were included. Median progression-free survival (PFS) for VEGFr-TKI-intolerant patients in each arm was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and effect on PFS (hazard ratio (HR)) was calculated using the Cox proportional hazard model. Results: In VEGFr-TKI-intolerant patients (n58, 14%), median PFS was 5.4 months with everolimus and 1.9 months with placebo (HR: 0.32; P=0.004). In sunitinib-intolerant patients (n26), median PFS was 5.1 months with everolimus and 2.8 months with placebo (HR: 0.28; P=0.033). Grade 3/4 AEs reported with everolimus in VEGFr-TKI-intolerant patients included infections (16%), fatigue (7%) and stomatitis (4%). The toxicity profile of everolimus was similar in the VEGFr-TKI-intolerant and overall study populations. Conclusion: Everolimus is well tolerated and efficacious with no increased toxicity in patients intolerant to VEGFr-TKI therapy. © 2012 Cancer Research UK All rights reserved.


Teruel-Sanchez-Vegazo C.,Hospital Universitario Ramon y Cajal | Faro-Leal V.,Hospital Universitario Ramon y Cajal | Muriel-Garcia A.,Hospital Universitario Ramon y Cajal | Manas-Gallardo N.,Hospital Madrid Norte Sanchinarro
Revista Espanola de Enfermedades Digestivas | Year: 2016

Introduction: Gastrointestinal Short Form Questionnaire (GSFQ) is a questionnaire for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) diagnosis, with a version in Spanish language, not yet compared to an objective test. Aims: To establish GSFQ diagnostic performance against 24-hour pH monitoring carried out in two tertiary care hospitals. Methods: Consecutive adult patients with typical GERD symptoms (heartburn, regurgitation) referred for pH monitoring fulfilled the GSFQ (score range 0-30, proportional to probability of GERD). Diagnosis of GERD was established when acid exposure time in distal esophagus was superior to 4.5% or symptom association probability was greater than 95%. Receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) curves were calculated and best cut-off score determined, with corresponding sensitivity, specificity and likelihood ratios (LR) (95% confidence interval for each). Results: One hundred and fifty-two patients were included (59.9% women, age 47.9 ± 13.9; 97.4% heartburn; 71.3% regurgitation). pH monitoring was abnormal in 65.8%. Mean GSFQ score was 11.2 ± 6. Area under ROC was 56.5% (47.0-65.9%). Optimal cut-off score was 13 or greater: sensitivity 40% (30.3-50.3%), specificity 71.2% (56.9-82.9%), positive LR 1.39 (0.85-2.26) and negative LR 0.84 (0.67-1.07). Exclusion of questions 1 and 3 of the original GSFQ, easily interpreted as referred to dyspepsia and not GERD, improved only marginally the diagnostic performance: AUROC 59.1%. Conclusion: The GSFQ does not predict results of pH monitoring in patients with typical symptoms in a tertiary care setting. © 2016 Arán Ediciones, S. L.


Calvo E.,Hospital Madrid Norte Sanchinarro | Grunwald V.,Hannover Medical School | Bellmunt J.,University of the Sea
European Journal of Cancer | Year: 2014

The mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor (mTORI) everolimus and the tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) axitinib are the only two post-first-line treatment options for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) licensed at present. Extrapolation of robust phase III studies suggests that median progression-free survival (PFS) is similar between agents. This presents a dilemma for the physician planning treatment for their patients with mRCC: should they be treated with a TKI-mTORI or a TKI-TKI sequence? The lack of direct comparison between axitinib and everolimus leaves the clinician without clear guidance on the optimal choice in second-line therapy. In phase III studies, both post first-line everolimus and axitinib have been shown to delay disease progression; however, cumulative toxicity with sequential use of TKIs may result in more treatment interruptions or dose reductions or increased likelihood of adverse events. While everolimus exerts a tolerability advantage, axitinib is associated with higher response rate and a similar PFS benefit. Proven superiority cannot be used to guide treatment sequence selection in mRCC. Instead, therapeutic planning requires us to take a long-term view of our patient's treatment that includes quality of life and a balance between symptom control, adverse event management and avoidance of unnecessary drug interruptions or dose reductions. In the absence of curative therapies, sustaining a patient's quality of life is a major goal throughout the course of treatment and choosing a second-line agent that is able to adequately achieve this by limiting adverse events should be a priority. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Hospital Madrid Norte Sanchinarro and Hospital Ramon y Cajal
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Revista espanola de enfermedades digestivas : organo oficial de la Sociedad Espanola de Patologia Digestiva | Year: 2016

Gastrointestinal Short Form Questionnaire (GSFQ) is a questionnaire for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) diagnosis, with a version in Spanish language, not yet compared to an objective test.To establish GSFQ diagnostic performance against 24-hour pH monitoring carried out in two tertiary care hospitals.Consecutive adult patients with typical GERD symptoms (heartburn, regurgitation) referred for pH monitoring fulfilled the GSFQ (score range 0-30, proportional to probability of GERD). Diagnosis of GERD was established when acid exposure time in distal esophagus was superior to 4.5% or symptom association probability was greater than 95%. Receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) curves were calculated and best cut-off score determined, with corresponding sensitivity, specificity and likelihood ratios (LR) (95% confidence interval for each).One hundred and fifty-two patients were included (59.9% women, age 47.9 13.9; 97.4% heartburn; 71.3% regurgitation). pH monitoring was abnormal in 65.8%. Mean GSFQ score was 11.2 6. Area under ROC was 56.5% (47.0-65.9%). Optimal cut-off score was 13 or greater: sensitivity 40% (30.3-50.3%), specificity 71.2% (56.9-82.9%), positive LR 1.39 (0.85-2.26) and negative LR 0.84 (0.67-1.07). Exclusion of questions 1 and 3 of the original GSFQ, easily interpreted as referred to dyspepsia and not GERD, improved only marginally the diagnostic performance: AUROC 59.1%.The GSFQ does not predict results of pH monitoring in patients with typical symptoms in a tertiary care setting.


Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is increasingly recognized as an independent risk factor for premature cardiovascular disease (CVD) and elevated cardiovascular death rate in patients aged 20 to 39 years. Dyslipidemia and atherosclerotic changes are more common in children with T1DM than in healthy children. Childhood and adolescent diabetes is commonly associated with additional risk factors such as obesity, dyslipidemia and hypertension. The metabolic syndrome is a clinical construct characterized by a clustering of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors and is associated with an increased risk of premature coronary heart disease incidence, and an increased risk of all-cause and CVD mortality in adults. While in adults with T1DM the role of metabolic syndrome remains controversial, in pediatric patients most of the studies are cross-sectional and focus their attention into individual CVRF. Early identification and treatment of cardiovascular risk factors seem to be necessary, particularly in light of the high incidence of future cardiovascular disease in patients with type 1 diabetes.


Belda-Iniesta C.,Hospital Universitario La Paz | Belda-Iniesta C.,Hospital Madrid Norte Sanchinarro | De Castro J.,Hospital Universitario La Paz | Perona R.,Hospital Universitario La Paz
Journal of Proteome Research | Year: 2011

Matching the right medical strategy to the right patient is the key for modern clinical oncology. To this aim, we have many delicate drugs designed to target in elegant ways critical proteins identified in cancer cells. However, clinical oncologists and multidisciplinary groups devoted to treating patients in an integrative fashion have histology and an TNM staging system as the most relevant biomarkers to decide therapeutic approaches for our patients. In addition, the most used drugs are classical chemotherapeutic compounds such as cisplatin, epirrubicin, irinotecan, oxaliplatin, and so on. Thus, new targeted therapies, surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy will live together causing a duality for the immediate future. We will try to delineate unmet needs for clinical oncologists that would add value for cancer proteomics in terms of true patients. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

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