Hospital General Universitario Morales Meseguer

San Sebastián de los Reyes, Spain

Hospital General Universitario Morales Meseguer

San Sebastián de los Reyes, Spain

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Mateos M.-V.,University of Salamanca | Hernandez M.-T.,Hospital Universitario Of Canarias | Giraldo P.,Hospital Universitario Miguel Servet | De La Rubia J.,San Vicente Mártir Catholic University of Valencia | And 15 more authors.
New England Journal of Medicine | Year: 2013

BACKGROUND: For patients with smoldering multiple myeloma, the standard of care is observation until symptoms develop. However, this approach does not identify high-risk patients who may benefit from early intervention. METHODS: In this randomized, open-label, phase 3 trial, we randomly assigned 119 patients with high-risk smoldering myeloma to treatment or observation. Patients in the treatment group received an induction regimen (lenalidomide at a dose of 25 mg per day on days 1 to 21, plus dexamethasone at a dose of 20 mg per day on days 1 to 4 and days 12 to 15, at 4-week intervals for nine cycles), followed by a maintenance regimen (lenalidomide at a dose of 10 mg per day on days 1 to 21 of each 28-day cycle for 2 years). The primary end point was time to progression to symptomatic disease. Secondary end points were response rate, overall survival, and safety. RESULTS: After a median follow-up of 40 months, the median time to progression was significantly longer in the treatment group than in the observation group (median not reached vs. 21 months; hazard ratio for progression, 0.18; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.09 to 0.32; P<0.001). The 3-year survival rate was also higher in the treatment group (94% vs. 80%; hazard ratio for death, 0.31; 95% CI, 0.10 to 0.91; P = 0.03). A partial response or better was achieved in 79% of patients in the treatment group after the induction phase and in 90% during the maintenance phase. Toxic effects were mainly grade 2 or lower. CONCLUSIONS: Early treatment for patients with high-risk smoldering myeloma delays progression to active disease and increases overall survival. Copyright © 2013 Massachusetts Medical Society.


Herrera Gimenez M.,Hospital General Universitario Morales Meseguer
Revista de Psiquiatria y Salud Mental | Year: 2011

Objective: The purpose of this article is to add to the knowledge of the neurobiology and aetiopathogenesis of bulimia nervosa, a common disorder in routine clinical practice. To do this, we will study decision making in low risk and low uncertainty patients. Material and methods: The study consisted of 19 females who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of bulimia nervosa according to the DSM-IV and a control group of 28 healthy female students from the Faculty of Psychology. They performed two tasks: one a "cups task" risk and the other an "ambiguity task", both associated with emotions and decision making. Results: The patients with bulimia took more risks in the win domain than in the lose domain, whereas the reverse was observed in the control group. In the decision making task, low ambiguity, and the number of decisions risked, was similar in both bulimia nervosa and the control group. Conclusions: Our results support those of previous investigations and theories that postulate that the making of decisions is not only mediated by cognitive processes, but the emotions also play an important role in these processes. © 2010 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.


Mercader P.,Hospital General Universitario Morales Meseguer
Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology | Year: 2010

Abstract Muir-Torre syndrome (MTS) is an autosomal dominant genodermatosis that consists of unusual cutaneous sebaceous neoplasm, with or without kerathoacantomas and one or more low-grade visceral malignancies, with or without colonic polyps, in the absence of other predisposing factors. This chapter presents a review of the principal clinical and genetic findings in this syndrome and discusses its relation with Lynch syndrome. © 2010 Landes Bioscience and Springer Science+Business Media.


Garcia Santos J.M.,Hospital General Universitario Morales Meseguer
Radiologia | Year: 2011

The reviewer's job is fundamental to the editorial process in a scientific journal. The quality of the review will determine the quality of the journal. Therefore, it is very important for the reviewers to make this mission their own and to contribute to the development of science and of the journal. On the other hand, the focus of a review will depend largely on the type of journal for which one is reviewing. In this article, we explain what the journal Radiología, the scientific journal of the Spanish Society of Medical Radiology, expects of its reviewers and their reviews of original articles. We aim to establish some basic rules to lay the groundwork for the development of more detailed guidelines for reviewing articles for the journal Radiología. © 2011 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.


Rios Risquez M.I.,Hospital General Universitario Morales Meseguer
Revista de enfermería (Barcelona, Spain) | Year: 2012

To determine whether the intent of career mobility is associated with the frequency of job stressors and burnout syndrome experienced by emergency nurses. Specific objectives: to assess perceived frequency of job stressors and burnout syndrome prevalence and its possible association with demographic and occupational values of the sample analyzed. We performed a cross-sectional study. We used a survey of sociodemographic and occupational variables, and two validated questionnaires: the "Nursing Stress Scale" validated by Escriba et al. (1999) and the Inventory to assess Burnout Syndrome (MBI-GS, Schaufeli et al., 1996). The total Stress score mean was 32.88 +/- 12.67. There was a Burnout prevalence of 2.34%, while 23.4% of the sample expressed high levels of cynicism/depersonalization. The frequency of job stressors was significantly associated with burnout syndrome dimensions. The frequency of stressors and intention of career mobility were significant predictors of emotional exhaustion and cynicism, while the fixed night shift was associated with lower professional efficacy. This study shows a moderate frequency of job stressors in the unit analyzed, and a low prevalence of Burnout Syndrome. The intention to leave or career mobility is an important predictor of burnout process, so it should be something to take into account by human resource managers, in order to prevent the development of the burnout process in health organizations.


Heller S.L.,New York University | Garcia Santos J.M.,Hospital General Universitario Morales Meseguer
Radiologia | Year: 2011

Despite the proliferation of journals and the demanding responsibilities of an editorship, there are very few clearly delineated standards for editorial education. The editor of a medical journal has a challenging role. He or she must deal with scientific decisions and appraisals that require skill in both writing and critical review. But the editor also has to cope with other concerns, including ethical issues, opposition within the editorial board, and conflict with disgruntled authors. The editor has also to design the journal's future, and make decisions considering the strategic interest of the journal and the needs of the journal's readers. In this paper, we examine the medical editor's role, review the topic of education for those interested in medical editorial work and discuss the tenets and structure of existing medical editorial training programs. © 2010 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.


Garcia Santos J.M.,Hospital General Universitario Morales Meseguer
Radiologia | Year: 2011

Writing a scientific article is difficult, but skillful writing does not depend only on talent. This skill can be learned, and writing requires discipline and dedication. This article discusses the basic characteristics of the IMRaD (Introduction, Material and methods, Results, and Discussion) format and the contents of each section, as well as the characteristics of the title, abstract, and bibliographical references. It also provides a list of five characteristics that are essential for an original article published in a scientific journal: objective, permission of the ethics committee, a structured material and methods section, results that follow appropriately from the material and methods section, and a structured discussion. Furthermore, we provide a basic outline for the discussion section consisting of stating the most important results, developing a critical discussion of the results, stating and discussing the strengths and limitations of the study, and elaborating the final synthesis. © 2011 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L. Todos los derechos reservados.


Plasencia Martinez J.M.,Hospital General Universitario Morales Meseguer
Radiologia | Year: 2015

Pulmonary radiofrequency ablation requires more than just interventional radiology skills. Patients must be selected carefully, and the acts that need to be done before, during, and after the procedure must be coordinated. To guarantee patient safety, radiologists need to know the variants of the technique, the precautions that must be taken, the complications that can occur, and the risks involved. Early differentiation between tumor tissue and normal changes secondary to treatment on imaging tests will make it possible to repeat the treatment without delays, and this will increase survival. This article describes how to coordinate and carry out pulmonary radiofrequency ablation, the complications of the technique, and the current evidence in follow-up. © 2013 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espanña, S.L.U. All rights reserved.


Plasencia Martinez J.M.,Hospital General Universitario Morales Meseguer
Radiologia | Year: 2015

The risks involved in surgical treatment and conventional radiotherapy in patients with early lung cancer or lung metastases often make these treatments difficult to justify. However, on the other hand, it is also unacceptable to allow these lesions to evolve freely because, left untreated, these neoplasms will usually lead to the death of the patient. In recent years, alternative local therapies have been developed, such as pulmonary radiofrequency ablation, which has proven to increase survival with a minimal risk of complications. There are common recommendations for these treatments, and although the specific indications for using one technique or another have yet to be established, there are clearly defined situations that will determine the outcome of the treatment. It is important to know these situations, because appropriate patient selection is essential for therapeutic success. This article aims to describe the characteristics and constraints of pulmonary radiofrequency ablation and to outline its role in thoracic oncology in light of the current evidence. © 2013 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espanña, S.L.U. All rights reserved.


A woman in Spain who suddenly became very religious and believed she was speaking with the Virgin Mary turned out to have a brain tumor that appears to have caused her symptoms, according to a new report of the case. The 60-year-old women was said to be a happy, positive person who was not particularly religious. But over a two-month period, her friends and family noticed changes in her personality and behavior. She appeared sad and withdrawn, and also showed increasing interest in the Bible and other sacred writings, the report said. The woman started spending hours during the day reciting religious writings. She also had mystical experiences, in which she reported seeing, feeling and talking with the Virgin Mary, the report said. [8 Ways Religion Impacts Your Life] Those close to her thought the woman might be experiencing depression, because she was caring for a relative with cancer at the time. However, when her doctors performed an MRI, they saw several lesions in her brain. After taking a biopsy from one of the lesions, doctors diagnosed the woman with glioblastoma multiforme, a particularly aggressive form of brain cancer. The tumors were too large to treat with surgery, so the woman received chemotherapy and radiation for the cancer. Her doctors also prescribed antipsychotic drugs for her, because some studies have suggested this class of drugs may have an anti-cancer effect on glioblastoma. During the woman's five-week treatment, her religious visions gradually disappeared, the report said. In this patient's case, "it is clear that the religious experience represented a fracture" from her prior behavior that was "not preceded by a gradual change in her thinking and acting," the researchers, from the Hospital General Universitario Morales Meseguer in Murcia, Spain, wrote in their paper, published online Dec. 12, 2016, in the journal Neurocase. "Nor was there any kind of trigger or reason [for the behavior change] except for the disease, and hence, it can be considered a clearly pathological experience," they said. It's not clear how often people experience "hyper-religiosity" or other behavior changes as their first symptom of a brain tumor, the researchers said. One review found that up to 22 percent of all brain tumors may first appear along with psychotic symptoms. From this one case, it's not possible to pinpoint the part of the brain responsible for the women's religious experience, the researchers said. But, they note that the right temporal lobe, a brain region that has previously been linked to the development of mystical experiences, also appeared to be involved in the woman's case. The researchers also said that, before the woman's extreme religious behavior, she did believe in God, so this "was not a case of religious conversion." The woman's condition quickly declined — she experienced a stroke two months after she started treatment, the report said. Eight months after her cancer diagnosis, she died due to the progression of her tumor. The researchers also suspect that, before her cancer diagnosis, the patient may have experienced non-convulsive seizures, possibly as a result of her brain tumor. They suspected this because of particular changes they saw in her brain scan. Some cases of hyper-religious behavior have also been reported in people with epilepsy, according to the report. However, the researchers were unable to perform tests to confirm the epilepsy diagnosis.

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