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Do Rego A.T.,Center for Diabetes and Vascular Medicine | Do Rego A.T.,Gregorio Maranon Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon | Klop B.,Center for Diabetes and Vascular Medicine | Birnie E.,St. Franciscus Gasthuis | And 6 more authors.
Nutrients | Year: 2013

Fasting and postprandial triglyceride concentrations largely depend on dietary and lifestyle factors. Alcohol intake is associated with triglycerides, but the effect of alcohol on diurnal triglyceridemia in a free living situation is unknown. During three days, 139 men (range: 18-80 years) measured their own capillary triglyceride (cTG) concentrations daily on six fixed time-points before and after meals, and the total daily alcohol intake was recorded. The impact of daily alcohol intake (none; low, lt;10 g/day; moderate, 10-30 g/day; high, gt;30 g/day) on diurnal triglyceridemia was analyzed by the incremental area under the cTG curve (ΔcTG-AUC) reflecting the mean of the six different time-points. Fasting cTG were similar between the alcohol groups, but a trend of increased cTG was observed in men with moderate and high alcohol intake after dinner and at bedtime (p for trend lt;0.001) which persisted after adjustment for age, smoking and body mass index. The ΔcTG-AUC was significantly lower in males with low alcohol intake (3.0 ± 1.9 mmol·h/L) (n = 27) compared to males with no (7.0 ± 1.8 mmol·h/L) (n = 34), moderate (6.5 ± 1.8 mmol·h/L) (n = 54) or high alcohol intake (7.2 ± 2.2 mmol·h/L) (n = 24), when adjusted for age, smoking and body mass index (adjusted p value lt; 0.05). In males, low alcohol intake was associated with decreased diurnal triglyceridemia, whereas moderate and high alcohol intake was associated with increased triglycerides after dinner and at bed time. © 2013 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

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