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Hospital de Órbigo, Spain

Montravers P.,University Paris Diderot | Bassetti M.,Clinica Malattie Infettive | Dupont H.,University of Picardie Jules Verne | Eckmann C.,Klinikum Peine | And 7 more authors.
Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy | Year: 2013

Objectives: Tigecycline is an approved treatment for complicated skin and soft-tissue infections (cSSTIs). The efficacy of tigecycline as monotherapy or in combination with other antibacterials in the treatment of cSSTI in routine practice is described. Patients and methods: Individual patient-level data were pooled from five European observational studies (July 2006 to October 2011). Results: A total of 254 cSSTI patients who received tigecycline were included (mean age 63.2+14.9 years). Of these, 34.4% were in intensive care units, 54.5% acquired their infection in hospital and 90.9% had at least one comorbidity. Infection most commonly affected the limbs (62.4%) and 43.8% of infections were classified as necrotizing. The mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores at the beginning of treatment were 15.0+7.9 (n=205) and 5.8+3.9 (n=32), respectively, indicating high disease severity. Staphylococcus aureus (52.7%), Escherichia coli (18.0%) and Enterococcus faecium (12.0%) were the most frequently isolated pathogens; 32.9% of infections were polymicrobial and 30.5% were due to resistant pathogens. Overall, 71.8% received tigecycline as monotherapy and 28.2% as combination therapy for a mean duration of 12 days. Clinical response rates at the end of treatment were 79.6% for all patients who received the standard dosage (183/230), 86.7% for patients who received tigecycline as monotherapy (143/165), 75.0% for patients with a nosocomial infection (96/128), 75.3% for patients with an APACHE II score .15 (61/81) and 58.3% for patients with a SOFA score =7 (7/12). Conclusions: In these real-life studies, tigecycline, alone and in combination, achieved favourable clinical response rates in patients with cSSTI with a high severity of illness. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. Source


Guirao X.,Hospital General de Granollers | Guirao X.,International University of Catalonia | Garcia M.S.,Complutense University of Madrid | Bassetti M.,Clinica Malattie Infettive | And 7 more authors.
Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy | Year: 2013

Objectives: Tigecycline is approved for the treatment of complicated skin and soft-tissue infections (cSSTIs) and complicated intra-abdominal infections (cIAIs) in adults. In this analysis the safety and tolerability profile of tigecycline (used alone or in combination) for the treatment of patients with approved indications of cSSTI and cIAI were examined under real-life clinical conditions. Patients and methods: Individual patient-level data were pooled from five European observational studies (July 2006 to October 2011). A total of 254 cSSTI and 785 cIAI patients were included. The mean age was 63 years; 34.4% and 56.6% were in intensive care units, 90.9% and 88.1% had at least one comorbidity and mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II scores at the beginning of treatment were 15.0+7.9 and 16.9+7.6, respectively. Results: Data on adverse events (AEs) were available for 198 cSSTI and 590 cIAI patients in three studies. Nausea and vomiting were reported in =2% of patients. The most common serious AEs were multi-organ failure (4.0% and 10.0% in cSSTI and cIAI patients, respectively) and sepsis (4.0% and 6.1%, respectively). Death was recorded for 24/254 (9.4%) cSSTI and 147/785 (18.7%) cIAI patients. Mortality rates were higher in the group with a baseline APACHE II score of .15 compared with those with a score of =15 (18.7% versus 3.5% for cSSTI patients and 23.8% versus 16.0% for cIAI patients). A similar trend was seen when cIAI patients were stratified by Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score. Conclusions: The safety and tolerability of tigecycline, alone and in combination, are consistent with the level of critical illness among patients in these real-life studies. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. Source


Eckmann C.,Klinikum Peine | Montravers P.,University Paris Diderot | Bassetti M.,Clinica Malattie Infettive | Bodmann K.F.,Klinikum Barnim GmbH | And 7 more authors.
Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy | Year: 2013

Objectives: Tigecycline is a broad-spectrum antibiotic approved for the treatment of complicated intra-abdominal infections (cIAIs). The efficacy of tigecycline when administered as monotherapy or in combination with other antibacterials in the treatment of cIAIs in routine clinical practice is described. Patients and methods: Individual patient-level data were pooled from five European observational studies (July 2006 to October 2011). Results: A total of 785 cIAI patients who received tigecycline were included (mean age 63.1+14.0 years). Of these, 56.6% were in intensive care units, 65.6% acquired their infection in hospital, 88.1% had at least one comorbidity and 65.7% had secondary peritonitis. The mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores at the beginning of treatment were 16.9+7.6 (n=614) and 7.0+4.2 (n=108), respectively, indicating high disease severity. Escherichia coli (41.8%), Enterococcus faecium (40.1%) and Enterococcus faecalis (21.1%) were the most frequently isolated pathogens; 49.1% of infections were polymicrobial and 17.5% were due to resistant pathogens. Overall, 54.8% (n=430) received tigecycline as monotherapy and 45.2% (n=355) as combination therapy for a mean duration of 10.6 days. Clinical response rates at the end of treatment were 77.4% for all patients (567/733), 80.6% for patients who received tigecycline as monotherapy (329/408), 75.2% for patients with a nosocomial infection (354/471), 75.8% for patients with an APACHE II score .15 (250/330) and 54.2% (32/59) for patients with a SOFA score =7. Conclusions: In these real-life studies, tigecycline, alone and in combination, achieved favourable clinical response rates in patients with cIAI with a high severity of illness. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. Source


Busquets-Perez N.,Hospital General de Granollers | Marzo-Ortega H.,University of Leeds | Emery P.,Chapel Allerton Hospital
Expert Opinion on Emerging Drugs | Year: 2013

Introduction: Only non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs) and TNF inhibitors (TNFi) are effective in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). However, not all patients successfully respond to these drugs and a subset may have contraindications to their use. Areas covered: In the last decade, an earlier diagnosis of AS has been achieved due to the increasing availability of MRI. This has led to prompt treatment initiation with improved outcomes. NSAIDs and TNFi are the current treatments for AS which lead to sustained clinical responses in the long term. Recent studies have shown other potential biomarkers in AS, such as the IL-17/IL-23 axis. This has translated into the development of new drugs which interfere with these pathways, such as apremilast and secukinumab, which have shown efficacy in early clinical trials. Expert opinion: AS carries considerable short- and long-term disabilities. Anti-TNF-α therapies reduce pain, improve function and decrease inflammation as seen by MRI. New treatment options are being developed which may prove efficacious on those patients not responding to anti-TNF. The ultimate research goal should focus on treatments to prevent and stop new bone formation. © 2013 Informa UK, Ltd. Source


Heizmann W.R.,Center for Microbiology and Infectious Diseases | Dupont H.,University of Picardie Jules Verne | Montravers P.,University Paris Diderot | Guirao X.,Hospital General de Granollers | And 7 more authors.
Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy | Year: 2013

Objectives: Antimicrobial drug resistance is a growing problem in Europe and, even with differences in epidemiology, it is of great concern. The treatment of complicated skin and soft-tissue infections (cSSTIs) and complicated intra-abdominal infections (cIAIs) is hindered further by pathogens that are resistant to methicillin, carbapenems, third-generation cephalosporins and glycopeptides. Patients and methods: An analysis of the microbiological results from five European observational studies (July 2006 to October 2011) evaluating the efficacy of tigecycline (prescribed as monotherapy or in combination with other antibacterials) for the treatment of cSSTI and cIAI is presented. Results: In total, 213 cSSTI and 623 cIAI patients were included; 34.4%and 56.6%, respectively, were critically ill in intensive care units. At baseline, at least one pathogen was isolated in 167 (78.4%) cSSTI and 464 (74.5%) cIAI patients, and 32.9% and 49.1% of infections were polymicrobial. In cSSTI, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli (52.7% and 18.0%, respectively) were the most frequently isolated pathogens, whereas in cIAI most infections were due to E. coli (41.8%), Enterococcus faecium (40.1%) and Enterococcus faecalis (21.1%). Clinical responsewas observed in.80%of patientswith E. coli in both cIAI and cSSTI. In cSSTI patients, the clinical response rate to S. aureus was 80.8%. For cIAI, 77.4% of E. faeciumand 79.5% of E. faecalis patients responded to treatment. Conclusions: Tigecycline when given alone or in combination with other antibacterials appeared to be efficacious against multiple pathogens, affirming its role in real-life clinical practice as a broad-spectrum antibacterial for the treatment of patients with cSSTI and cIAI, including the critically ill, across Europe. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. Source

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