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Strbian D.,University of Helsinki | Seiffge D.J.,University of Basel | Breuer L.,Friedrich - Alexander - University, Erlangen - Nuremberg | Numminen H.,University of Tampere | And 21 more authors.
Stroke | Year: 2013

Background and Purpose-The DRAGON score predicts functional outcome in the hyperacute phase of intravenous thrombolysis treatment of ischemic stroke patients. We aimed to validate the score in a large multicenter cohort in anterior and posterior circulation. Methods-Prospectively collected data of consecutive ischemic stroke patients who received intravenous thrombolysis in 12 stroke centers were merged (n=5471). We excluded patients lacking data necessary to calculate the score and patients with missing 3-month modified Rankin scale scores. The final cohort comprised 4519 eligible patients. We assessed the performance of the DRAGON score with area under the receiver operating characteristic curve in the whole cohort for both good (modified Rankin scale score, 0-2) and miserable (modified Rankin scale score, 5-6) outcomes. Results-Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.84 (0.82-0.85) for miserable outcome and 0.82 (0.80- 0.83) for good outcome. Proportions of patients with good outcome were 96%, 93%, 78%, and 0% for 0 to 1, 2, 3, and 8 to 10 score points, respectively. Proportions of patients with miserable outcome were 0%, 2%, 4%, 89%, and 97% for 0 to 1, 2, 3, 8, and 9 to 10 points, respectively. When tested separately for anterior and posterior circulation, there was no difference in performance (P=0.55); areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve were 0.84 (0.83-0.86) and 0.82 (0.78-0.87), respectively. No sex-related difference in performance was observed (P=0.25). Conclusions-The DRAGON score showed very good performance in the large merged cohort in both anterior and posterior circulation strokes. The DRAGON score provides rapid estimation of patient prognosis and supports clinical decision-making in the hyperacute phase of stroke care (eg, when invasive add-on strategies are considered). © 2013 American Heart Association, Inc.


Brissot E.,University Pierre and Marie Curie | Brissot E.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Labopin M.,University Pierre and Marie Curie | Labopin M.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | And 20 more authors.
Haematologica | Year: 2015

This study aimed to determine the impact of tyrosine kinase inhibitors given pre- and post-allogeneic stem cell transplantation on long-term outcome of patients allografted for Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia. This retrospective analysis from the EBMT Acute Leukemia Working Party included 473 de novoPhiladelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients in first complete remission who underwent an allogeneic stem cell transplantation using a human leukocyte antigen-identical sibling or human leukocyte antigen-matched unrelated donor between 2000 and 2010. Three hundred and ninety patients received tyrosine kinase inhibitors before transplant, 329 at induction and 274 at consolidation. Kaplan-Meier estimates of leukemia-free survival, overall survival, cumulative incidences of relapse incidence, and non-relapse mortality at five years were 38%, 46%, 36% and 26%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, tyrosine-kinase inhibitors given before allogeneic stem cell transplantation was associated with a better overall survival (HR=0.68; P=0.04) and was associated with lower relapse incidence (HR=0.5;P=0.01). In the post-transplant period, multivariate analysis identified prophylactic tyrosine-kinase inhibitor administration to be a significant factor for improved leukemia-free survival (HR=0.44; P=0.002) and overall survival (HR=0.42; P=0.004), and a lower relapse incidence (HR=0.40; P=0.01). Over the past decade, administration of tyrosine kinase inhibitors before allogeneic stem cell transplantation has significantly improved the long-term allogeneic stem cell transplantation outcome of adult Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Prospective studies will be of great interest to further confirm the potential benefit of the prophylactic use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the post-transplant setting. © 2015 Ferrata Storti Foundation.


Rivera F.P.,Cayetano Heredia Peruvian University | Ochoa T.J.,Cayetano Heredia Peruvian University | Ochoa T.J.,University of Houston | Ruiz J.,Hospital Clinic Institute dInvestigacions Biomediques August Pi i Sunyer | And 10 more authors.
Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene | Year: 2011

Norovirus was detected in 17.4% of 224 diarrhoeal samples from children younger than 24 months of age in Lima, in whom all common pathogens had been excluded (pathogen negative). Norovirus was identified more frequently in children older than 12 months of age than in younger children (34% vs 8%, P<0.001). Among norovirus-positive samples, genogroup II was the predominant group (92%). Compared with rotavirus, norovirus episodes tended to be of shorter duration and less severe. The role of norovirus as a cause of diarrhoea and the ascertainment of its severity in developing countries needs further confirmation by future epidemiological studies. © 2011 Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.


Strbian D.,University of Helsinki | Ringleb P.,University of Heidelberg | Michel P.,University of Lausanne | Breuer L.,Friedrich - Alexander - University, Erlangen - Nuremberg | And 16 more authors.
Stroke | Year: 2013

Background and Purpose-We previously reported increased benefit and reduced mortality after ultra-early stroke thrombolysis in a single center. We now explored in a large multicenter cohort whether extra benefit of treatment within 90 minutes from symptom onset is uniform across predefined stroke severity subgroups, as compared with later thrombolysis. Methods-Prospectively collected data of consecutive ischemic stroke patients who received IV thrombolysis in 10 European stroke centers were merged. Logistic regression tested association between treatment delays, as well as excellent 3-month outcome (modified Rankin scale, 0-1), and mortality. The association was tested separately in tertiles of baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale. Results-In the whole cohort (n=6856), shorter onset-to-treatment time as a continuous variable was significantly associated with excellent outcome (P<0.001). Every fifth patient had onset-to-treatment time≤90 minutes, and these patients had lower frequency of intracranial hemorrhage. After adjusting for age, sex, admission glucose level, and year of treatment, onset-to-treatment time≤90 minutes was associated with excellent outcome in patients with National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale 7 to 12 (odds ratio, 1.37; 95% confidence interval, 1.11-1.70; P=0.004), but not in patients with baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale>12 (odds ratio, 1.00; 95% confidence interval, 0.76-1.32; P=0.99) and baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale 0 to 6 (odds ratio, 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 0.78-1.39; P=0.80). In the latter, however, an independent association (odds ratio, 1.51; 95% confidence interval, 1.14-2.01; P<0.01) was found when considering modified Rankin scale 0 as outcome (to overcome the possible ceiling effect from spontaneous better prognosis of patients with mild symptoms). Ultra-early treatment was not associated with mortality. Conclusions-IV thrombolysis within 90 minutes is, compared with later thrombolysis, strongly and independently associated with excellent outcome in patients with moderate and mild stroke severity. © 2013 American Heart Association, Inc.


Marques N.,Barcelona Institute for Research in Biomedicine | Sese M.,Barcelona Institute for Research in Biomedicine | Canovas V.,Barcelona Institute for Research in Biomedicine | Valente F.,Barcelona Institute for Research in Biomedicine | And 13 more authors.
Oncogene | Year: 2014

Prostate tumor overexpressed-1 (PTOV1), a modulator of the Mediator transcriptional regulatory complex, is expressed at high levels in prostate cancer and other neoplasias in association with a more aggressive disease. Here we show that PTOV1 interacts directly with receptor of activated protein C kinase 1 (RACK1), a regulator of protein kinase C and Jun signaling and also a component of the 40S ribosome. Consistent with this interaction, PTOV1 was associated with ribosomes and its overexpression promoted global protein synthesis in prostate cancer cells and COS-7 fibroblasts in a mTORC1-dependent manner. Transfection of ectopic PTOV1 enhanced the expression of c-Jun protein without affecting the levels of c-Jun or RACK1 mRNA. Conversely, knockdown of PTOV1 caused significant declines in global protein synthesis and c-Jun protein levels. High levels of PTOV1 stimulated the motility and invasiveness of prostate cancer cells, which required c-Jun, whereas knockdown of PTOV1 strongly inhibited the tumorigenic and metastatic potentials of PC-3 prostate cancer cells. In human prostate cancer samples, the expression of high levels of PTOV1 in primary and metastatic tumors was significantly associated with increased nuclear localization of active c-Jun. These results unveil new functions of PTOV1 in the regulation of protein translation and in the progression of prostate cancer to an invasive and metastatic disease. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited.


Rowczenio D.M.,University College London | Trojer H.,University College London | Omoyinmi E.,University College London | Arostegui J.I.,Hospital Clinic Institute dInvestigacions Biomediques August Pi i Sunyer | And 9 more authors.
Arthritis and Rheumatology | Year: 2016

Objective: To investigate the molecular cause of persistent fevers in a patient returning from working overseas, in whom investigations for tropical diseases yielded negative results. Methods: DNA was extracted from the patient's whole blood, leukocyte subpopulations, saliva, hair root, and sperm. The TNFRSF1A gene was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), allele-specific PCR, Sanger sequencing, and next-generation sequencing. In silico molecular modeling was performed to predict the structural and functional consequences of the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) type I protein mutation in the extracellular domain. Results: Sanger sequencing corroborated by allele-specific PCR detected a novel in-frame deletion of 24 nucleotides (c.255_278del) in the TNFRSF1A gene, and this was subsequently confirmed using next-generation sequencing methods (targeted sequencing and amplicon-based deep sequencing). Results of amplicon-based deep sequencing revealed variable frequency of the mutant allele among different cell lines, including sperm, thus supporting the presence of gonosomal TNFRSF1A mosaicism. The patient had a complete response to treatment with interleukin-1 (IL-1) blockade, with resolution of symptoms and normalization of acute-phase protein levels. Conclusion: We describe the first case of gonosomal TNFRSF1A mosaicism in a patient with TNFR-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), which was attributable to a novel, somatic 24-nucleotide in-frame deletion. The clinical picture in this patient, including the complete response to IL-1 blockade, was typical of that found in TRAPS. This case adds TRAPS to the list of dominantly inherited autoinflammatory diseases reported to be caused by somatic (or postzygotic) mutation. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology


Canivell S.,Hospital Clinic Institute dInvestigacions Biomediques August Pi i Sunyer | Canivell S.,Transverse group for research in primary care Institute dInvestigacions Biomediques August Pi i Sunyer | Canivell S.,Diabetes and Obesity Laboratory Institute dInvestigacions Biomediques August Pi i Sunyer | Ruano E.G.,Diabetes and Obesity Laboratory Institute dInvestigacions Biomediques August Pi i Sunyer | And 17 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2013

GIP action in type 2 diabetic (T2D) patients is altered. We hypothesized that methylation changes could be present in GIP receptor of T2D patients. This study aimed to assess the differences in DNA methylation profile of GIPR promoter between T2D patients and age- and Body Mass Index (BMI)-matched controls. We included 93 T2D patients (cases) that were uniquely on diet (without any anti-diabetic pharmacological treatment). We matched one control (with oral glucose tolerance test negative, non diabetic), by age and BMI, for every case. Cytokines and hormones were determined by ELISA. DNA was extracted from whole blood and DNA methylation was assessed using the Sequenom EpiTYPER system. Our results showed that T2D patients were more insulin resistant and had a poorer β cell function than their controls. Fasting adiponectin was lower in T2D patients as compared to controls (7.0±3.8 μgr/mL vs. 10.0±4.2 μgr/mL). Levels of IL 12 in serum were almost double in T2D patients (52.8±58.3 pg/mL vs. 29.7±37.4 pg/mL). We found that GIPR promoter was hypomethylated in T2D patients as compared to controls. In addition, HOMA-IR and fasting glucose correlated negatively with mean methylation of GIPR promoter, especially in T2D patients. This case-control study confirms that newly diagnosed, drug-naïve T2D patients are more insulin resistant and have worse β cell function than age- and BMI-matched controls, which is partly related to changes in the insulin-sensitizing metabolites (adiponectin), in the proinflammatory profile (IL12) and we suggest in the methylation pattern of GIPR. Our study provides novel findings on GIPR promoter methylation profile which may improve our ability to understand type 2 diabetes pathogenesis. © 2013 Canivell et al.


PubMed | Armenian National Academy of Sciences, Hospital Clinic Institute dInvestigacions Biomediques August Pi i Sunyer and University College London
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Arthritis & rheumatology (Hoboken, N.J.) | Year: 2016

To investigate the molecular cause of persistent fevers in a patient returning from working overseas, in whom investigations for tropical diseases yielded negative results.DNA was extracted from the patients whole blood, leukocyte subpopulations, saliva, hair root, and sperm. The TNFRSF1A gene was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), allele-specific PCR, Sanger sequencing, and next-generation sequencing. In silico molecular modeling was performed to predict the structural and functional consequences of the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) type I protein mutation in the extracellular domain.Sanger sequencing corroborated by allele-specific PCR detected a novel in-frame deletion of 24 nucleotides (c.255_278del) in the TNFRSF1A gene, and this was subsequently confirmed using next-generation sequencing methods (targeted sequencing and amplicon-based deep sequencing). Results of amplicon-based deep sequencing revealed variable frequency of the mutant allele among different cell lines, including sperm, thus supporting the presence of gonosomal TNFRSF1A mosaicism. The patient had a complete response to treatment with interleukin-1 (IL-1) blockade, with resolution of symptoms and normalization of acute-phase protein levels.We describe the first case of gonosomal TNFRSF1A mosaicism in a patient with TNFR-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), which was attributable to a novel, somatic 24-nucleotide in-frame deletion. The clinical picture in this patient, including the complete response to IL-1 blockade, was typical of that found in TRAPS. This case adds TRAPS to the list of dominantly inherited autoinflammatory diseases reported to be caused by somatic (or postzygotic) mutation.


PubMed | Hospital Clinic Institute dInvestigacions Biomediques August Pi i Sunyer
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2013

GIP action in type 2 diabetic (T2D) patients is altered. We hypothesized that methylation changes could be present in GIP receptor of T2D patients. This study aimed to assess the differences in DNA methylation profile of GIPR promoter between T2D patients and age- and Body Mass Index (BMI)-matched controls. We included 93 T2D patients (cases) that were uniquely on diet (without any anti-diabetic pharmacological treatment). We matched one control (with oral glucose tolerance test negative, non diabetic), by age and BMI, for every case. Cytokines and hormones were determined by ELISA. DNA was extracted from whole blood and DNA methylation was assessed using the Sequenom EpiTYPER system. Our results showed that T2D patients were more insulin resistant and had a poorer cell function than their controls. Fasting adiponectin was lower in T2D patients as compared to controls (7.03.8 gr/mL vs. 10.04.2 gr/mL). Levels of IL 12 in serum were almost double in T2D patients (52.858.3 pg/mL vs. 29.737.4 pg/mL). We found that GIPR promoter was hypomethylated in T2D patients as compared to controls. In addition, HOMA-IR and fasting glucose correlated negatively with mean methylation of GIPR promoter, especially in T2D patients. This case-control study confirms that newly diagnosed, drug-nave T2D patients are more insulin resistant and have worse cell function than age- and BMI-matched controls, which is partly related to changes in the insulin-sensitizing metabolites (adiponectin), in the proinflammatory profile (IL12) and we suggest in the methylation pattern of GIPR. Our study provides novel findings on GIPR promoter methylation profile which may improve our ability to understand type 2 diabetes pathogenesis.


PubMed | Hospital Clinic Institute dInvestigacions Biomediques August Pi i Sunyer, Selayang Hospital and Kuala Lumpur Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Arthritis & rheumatology (Hoboken, N.J.) | Year: 2016

Blau syndrome is characterized by noncaseating granulomatous arthritis, dermatitis, and uveitis, and results from gain-of-function NOD2 mutations. This study was undertaken to identify the genetic cause of the disease in a family with 3 members with Blau syndrome.We studied a family with 3 affected members across 2 consecutive generations. The childrens symptoms started early (at 6 and 7 months of age) and included polyarthritis, dermatitis, uveitis, and fever. In contrast, the fathers symptoms started later (at 22 years of age) and included noncaseating granulomatous dermatitis and uveitis. We analyzed the NOD2 gene in all patients by both the Sanger method of DNA sequencing and amplicon-based deep sequencing using an Ion Torrent PGM platform.Sanger chromatograms revealed the heterozygous c.1001G>A transition in both children, which resulted in the p.Arg334Gln mutation that causes Blau syndrome. In contrast, the fathers chromatograms revealed a small peak of adenine at the c.1001 position, suggesting the presence of a somatic NOD2 mutation. To evaluate this hypothesis, we performed amplicon-based deep sequencing using DNA from different tissues, which confirmed a variable degree (0.9-12.9%) of somatic NOD2 mosaicism. The previous detection of the NOD2 mutation in his daughters strongly suggests the presence of gonosomal (somatic plus gonadal) NOD2 mosaicism in the father. Comparative analyses with Blau syndrome patients carrying the germline p.Arg334Gln NOD2 mutation revealed late onset of the disease, a mild inflammatory phenotype, and an absence of complications in patients with NOD2 mosaicism.This is the first description of gonosomal NOD2 mosaicism as the cause of intrafamilial recurrence of Blau syndrome. Our findings also indicate that Blau syndrome includes more diverse and milder phenotypes than previously described.

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