Hospital Carmen y Severo Ochoa

Cangas del Narcea, Spain

Hospital Carmen y Severo Ochoa

Cangas del Narcea, Spain

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Nicieza-Garcia M.L.,Hospital Carmen y Severo Ochoa | Salgueiro-Vazquez M.E.,University of Oviedo | Jimeno-Demuth F.J.,University of Oviedo | Manso G.,University of Oviedo
Farmacia Hospitalaria | Year: 2016

Objective: To assess potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP) using Beers (2012 version) and STOPP (2008 version) criteria in polypharmacy, community-dwelling, older patients. Methods: From the information collected in the invoicing data of the prescriptions and the electronic medical records, a sample was selected of 223 ≥ 65-year-old patients who were taking simultaneously 10 or more drugs per day. Beers and STOPP criteria were separately applied, and the results obtained with the two methods were compared. Results: A total of 141 (63.2%) patients presented at least one Beers criterion. The two most frequently observed Beers criteria independent of diagnosis were the use of benzodiazepines and the use of non-COX-2-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. With regard to Beers criteria considering diagnosis, the most frequent were the use of anticholinergic drugs in patients with lower urinary tract symptoms or benign prostatic hyperplasia, and the use of benzodiazepines, antipsychotics, zolpidem or H2-antihistamines, in patients with dementia or cognitive impairment. A total of 165 (73.9%) patients had at least one PIP according to the STOPP criteria. Duplicate drug classes and long-term use of long-acting benzodiazepines were the two most frequent STOPP criteria. Discussion: Our study identified a high frequency of PIP in polymedicated community-dwelling older patients. Simultaneous application of Beers and STOPP criteria represents a useful tool to improve prescribing in this population group.


Molina-Infante J.,Hospital San Pedro Of Alcantara | Lucendo A.J.,Hospital General | Angueira T.,Hospital General | Rodriguez-Tellez M.,Hospital Virgen Macarena | And 17 more authors.
Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics | Year: 2015

Background Empiric triple therapy for Helicobacter pylori should be abandoned when clarithromycin resistance rate is >15-20%. Optimisation of triple therapy (high-dose acid suppression and 14-day duration) can increase eradication rates by 10%. Aim To compare the efficacy and safety of optimised triple (OPT-TRI) and nonbismuth quadruple concomitant (OPT-CON) therapies. Methods Prospective multicentre study in 16 Spanish centres using triple therapy in clinical practice. In a 3-month two-phase fashion, the first 402 patients received an OPT-TRI therapy [esomeprazole (40 mg b.d.), amoxicillin (1 g b.d) and clarithromycin (500 mg b.d) for 14 days] and the last 375 patients an OPT-CON treatment [OPT-TRI therapy plus metronidazole (500 mg b.d)]. Results Seven-hundred seventy-seven consecutive patients were included (402 OPT-TRI, 375 OPT-CON). The OPT-CON therapy achieved significantly higher eradication rates in the per-protocol [82.3% (95% CI = 78-86%) vs. 93.8% (91-96%), P < 0.001] and intention-to-treat analysis [81.3% (78-86%) vs. 90.4% (87-93%), P < 0.001]. Adverse events (97% mild/moderate) were significantly more common with OPT-CON therapy (39% vs. 47%, P = 0.016), but full compliance with therapy was similar between groups (94% vs. 92%, P = 0.4). OPT-CON therapy was the only significant predictor of successful eradication (odds ratio, 2.24; 95% CI: 1.48-3.51, P < 0.001). The rate of participating centres achieving cure rates ≥90% favoured OPT-CON therapy (OPT-TRI 25% vs. OPT-CON 62%). Conclusions Empiric OPT-CON therapy achieved significantly higher cure rates (>90%) compared to OPT-TRI therapy. Addition of metronidazole to OPT-TRI therapy increased eradication rates by 10%, resulting in more mild adverse effects, but without impairing compliance with therapy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.


PubMed | Hospital Carmen y Severo Ochoa
Type: | Journal: Anales de pediatria (Barcelona, Spain : 2003) | Year: 2016

For decades dairy products have been a major source of iodine for decades. The purpose of this study was to determine the iodine nutritional status and its relationship with dairy consumption in pre-schooler children between 2 to 5 years old in a rural area with 27,847 inhabitants.It was planned to study 200 participants, selected by random sampling, proportional to the size of the municipality, age, and sex. Parents provided urine samples to analyse urinary iodine, as well as the nutritional information through an interview. A glass of milk or a slice of cheese was considered as a ration, and a portion of other milk derivatives were considered as half rations. The nutritional status of iodine was interpreted with the median (P[percentile]Of the total of 198 subjects that took part, 193 provide urine specimens for the determination of iodine levels. The mean dairy ration/day was 3.8 (SD:1.4). More than two-thirds (69.9%) drank 2 glasses of milk/day, and 88.1% consumed a dairy ration of another dairy product. The median urinary iodine level was 184 g/l, but was dependent on glasses of milk/day (282.5 g/l 4 glasses) and/or the type of milk (233.0 g/l in semi-skimmed). An intake of 115.1 g/day to 170.2 g/day of iodine was estimated, and that milk was the food which provided more iodine (89.9 g/day).Iodine intake was adequate, although higher than necessary when four or more glasses of milk were consumed, and/or when the milk was skimmed. The consumption of dairy products should be monitored to prevent both excessive and deficient intake of iodine.


PubMed | Hospital Quiron, Hospital Gregorio Maranon, Hospital Carmen y Severo Ochoa, Hospital Clinico Of Santiago and 17 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Digestive and liver disease : official journal of the Italian Society of Gastroenterology and the Italian Association for the Study of the Liver | Year: 2015

Aim was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of a moxifloxacin-containing second-line triple regimen in patients whose previous Helicobacter pylori eradication treatment failed.Prospective multicentre study including patients in whom a triple therapy or a non-bismuth-quadruple-therapy failed. Moxifloxacin (400mg qd), amoxicillin (1g bid), and esomeprazole (40 mg bid) were prescribed for 14 days. Eradication was confirmed by (13)C-urea-breath-test. Compliance was determined through questioning and recovery of empty medication envelopes.250 patients were consecutively included (mean age 48 15 years, 11% with ulcer). Previous (failed) therapy included: standard triple (n = 179), sequential (n = 27), and concomitant (n = 44); 97% of patients took all medications, 4 were lost to follow-up. Intention-to-treat and per-protocol eradication rates were 82.4% (95% CI, 77-87%) and 85.7% (95% CI, 81-90%). Cure rates were similar independently of diagnosis (ulcer, 77%; dyspepsia, 82%) and previous treatment (standard triple, 83%; sequential, 89%; concomitant, 77%). At multivariate analysis, only age was associated with eradication (OR = 0.957; 95% CI, 0.933-0.981). Adverse events were reported in 25.2% of patients: diarrhoea (9.6%), abdominal pain (9.6%), and nausea (9.2%).14-day moxifloxacin-containing triple therapy is an effective and safe second-line strategy in patients whose previous standard triple therapy or non-bismuth quadruple (sequential or concomitant) therapy has failed, providing a simple alternative to bismuth quadruple regimen.


Alvarez Caro F.,Hospital Carmen Y Severo Ochoa | Diaz Martin J.J.,Hospital Central Of Asturias | Riano Galan I.,Hospital San Agustin | Perez Solis D.,Hospital San Agustin | And 2 more authors.
Anales de Pediatria | Year: 2011

Introduction: Classic cardiovascular risk factors are present in infancy. C-reactive protein, leptin and adiponectin are the most important inflammatory cardiovascular risk markers. Patients and methods: A descriptive, cross-sectional study, including children aged 6-12 years old from two local primary schools in the city of Avilés. Body measurements were made to determine the prevalence of obesity and overweight. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure was measured and the presence of metabolic syndrome was determined. Family income, dietary, and life-style habits were collected using the questionnaires GRAFFAR, KIDMED and Self-report instruments for measuring physical activity, respectively. Blood analysis included lipid profile, insulin resistance profile, liver profile, C-reactive protein, leptin and adiponectin. Results: A total of 459 schoolchildren were included of whom 31% were overweight and 10.9% were obese. Obese children were heavier with higher levels of body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure, C- reactive protein, leptin, and lower levels of HDL-cholesterol and apolipoprotein A than non-obese children. No differences were found in physical and sedentary activities, but obese children had a worse quality diet than non-obese children. Conclusions: Prevalence of obesity and overweight is reaching worrying levels in school age children. Obesity is associated with other classic and inflammatory cardiovascular risk factors. Obese children have a worse quality diet, although they do not do any less physical activities or any more sedentary than non-obese children. © 2010 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Hospital Carmen y Severo Ochoa, Hospital Marina Baixa, Hospital Comarcal Of Zafra, Complejo Asistencial Universitario Of Leon and 4 more.
Type: | Journal: Revista clinica espanola | Year: 2016

To estimate the prevalence of obesity in patients treated by departments of Internal Medicine and to classify the patients according to the Edmonton Obesity Staging System (EOSS).An observational, descriptive cross-sectional study included outpatients older than 18 years, with a body mass index (BMI)>30, from 38 hospitals between the 1st and 14th of February, 2016. We classified the patients according to the EOSS and analysed their clinical, laboratory and demographic variables. A value of P<.05 was considered statistically significant.Of the 1,262 patients treated in consultations, we recruited 298 and analysed 265. The prevalence of obesity was 23.6%, the mean age was 62.4715.27 years, and the mean BMI was 36.15.3kg/mThe prevalence of obesity in the patients treated by Internal Medicine departments is similar to that of the general population, although the patients are older and have a higher BMI. EOSS is useful for implementing a comprehensive approach for patients with obesity, regardless of the BMI, which can help achieve better health and quality-of-life results.


Diaz Martin J.J.,Seccion de Gastroenterologia y Nutricion pediatrica | Jimenez D.G.,Hospital Carmen y Severo Ochoa
Nutricion Hospitalaria | Year: 2015

Nowadays, publications on probiotics have increased exponentially. However they usually are heterogeneous, use diverse strains and doses, and different outcomes, making it difficult to generalize their results. On the basis of the currently available literature, the use of probiotics is supported in the following diseases: acute diarrhea, antibiotic-associated diarrhea, irritable bowel syndrome, necrotizing enterocolitis and inflammatory bowel disease (particularly pouchitis). This paper provides an update of the potential role of probiotics in gastrointestinal diseases, in both pediatric and adult patients. © 2015, Grupo Aula Medica S.A. All rights reserved.


Nicieza-Garcia M.L.,Hospital Carmen y Severo Ochoa | Salgueiro-Vazquez M.E.,University of Oviedo | Jimeno-Demuth F.J.,University of Oviedo | Manso G.,University of Oviedo
Gaceta Sanitaria | Year: 2016

As part of the protocol of the Health Service of the Principality of Asturias (Spain), primary care physicians periodically receive listings of the treatments of patients of any age taking 10 or more drugs/day for 6 months. Currently, the Health Service of the Principality of Asturias is developing a project that aims to assess the medications of polypharmacy patients. The aim is to identify: 1) the consumption of medicines of low therapeutic usefulness, 2) the consumption of potentially nephrotoxic drugs in patients with a low glomerular filtration rate, and 3) potentially inappropriate prescribing in patients aged 65 years or older. The project was started in Health Area II and the aim is to extend it to the remaining health areas. In our opinion, its automation and general implementation could be useful to optimize drug prescription. © 2015 SESPAS.


Perez Guirado A.,CS de Cangas del Narcea | Fernandez Fernandez R.I.,CS de Cangas del Narcea | Arbesu Fernandez E.,Hospital Carmen y Severo Ochoa | Santos Rodriguez P.M.,CS de Cangas del Narcea
Pediatria de Atencion Primaria | Year: 2013

Lyme borreliosis is a multisystem disease mainly dermatological, rheumatical, neurological and cardio-logical. The detection and treatment in the early stages are essential to prevent its progression. The pediatrician, therefore, must be aware of the clinical presentations of the disease as well as to establish a correct diagnosis and treatment. Two cases are presented involving the most common forms of presentation.


PubMed | Hospital Carmen y Severo Ochoa and España University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Gaceta sanitaria | Year: 2015

As part of the protocol of the Health Service of the Principality of Asturias (Spain), primary care physicians periodically receive listings of the treatments of patients of any age taking 10 or more drugs/day for 6 months. Currently, the Health Service of the Principality of Asturias is developing a project that aims to assess the medications of polypharmacy patients. The aim is to identify: 1) the consumption of medicines of low therapeutic usefulness, 2) the consumption of potentially nephrotoxic drugs in patients with a low glomerular filtration rate, and 3) potentially inappropriate prescribing in patients aged 65 years or older. The project was started in Health Area II and the aim is to extend it to the remaining health areas. In our opinion, its automation and general implementation could be useful to optimize drug prescription.

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