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Liu J.,PLA Fourth Military Medical University | Liu S.-Y.,PLA Fourth Military Medical University | Zhao Y.-J.,Hospital Attached to Aeromedicine Institute of PLA | Gu X.,The 461 Hospital of PLA | And 3 more authors.
The Journal of surgical research | Year: 2016

BACKGROUND: A rodent occlusal hypofunction model has been widely established in jawbone-related studies. However, the effects of occlusal stimuli, with total elimination of molar contacts, and its rehabilitation on mandibular remodeling remain unclear.MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty-eight 5-wk-old Sprague-Dawley male rats were used. Twenty-four experimental rats underwent occlusal hypofunction by insertion of a bite-raising appliance. Twenty-four rats received no treatment (control group). Two weeks later, half the experimental rats (occlusal hypofunction group) were killed; the appliance was removed from the remaining experimental rats (recovery group) for two additional weeks before killing. Control animals were killed biweekly. Body weight and masseter muscle weight were measured, and the mandibles were subjected to micro-computed tomography to evaluate the mandibular morphology and cortical bone characteristics. The expressions of osteoblast- and osteoclast-related genes were evaluated with quantitative polymerase chain reaction.RESULTS: No significant body weight differences were observed between the experimental and control rats. However, lighter masseter muscle, shorter mandibular incisor crown, mandibular body and ramus, and higher mandibular alveolar process and first molar fossae were observed in the occlusal hypofunction group. Moreover, the cortical bone characteristics associated with the expression of osteoblast- and osteoclast-related genes were remarkably different in the central and posterior mandible in the occlusal hypofunction group. At the 2-wk recovery time point after occlusal stimuli, the altered parameters in the masseter and mandible returned to normal levels.CONCLUSIONS: Mandibular remodeling via bone turnover is region specific for altered occlusal stimuli. Normal occlusion is an important determinant of the mandibular morphology and architecture. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Source


Zhang H.,Hospital Attached to Aeromedicine Institute of PLA | Gan L.,Hospital Attached to Aeromedicine Institute of PLA | Guo Y.,Hospital Attached to Aeromedicine Institute of PLA | Wang R.-H.,Hospital Attached to Aeromedicine Institute of PLA
Chinese Journal of Tissue Engineering Research | Year: 2013

Background: Genetic studies have shown that there may be association between osteoprotegerin gene G1181C polymorphism and bone mineral density in postmenopausal women, but there are some differences in the conclusions. Objective: To study the association between osteoprotegerin gene G1181C polymorphism and bone mineral density in postmenopausal women through Meta-analysis. Methods: The PubMed database, Embase database, CNKI database and Wanfang database were searched for the observational studies about the association between osteoprotegerin gene G1181C polymorphism and bone mineral density in postmenopausal women. The standardized mean difference was considered as the effect indicator and calculated with random or fixed effect models according to the significance of heterogeneity. Results and Conclusion: A total of 9 articles were included with a total of 8 799 and 9 365 participants for which vertebral and spine bone mineral density had been measured, respectively. The analysis results showed that the bone mineral density of the postmenopausal women with the G allele of G1181C was significantly lower than that of the postmenopausal women with the C allele. Similar results were obtained in Caucasian population subgroup analysis. The Caucasian population subgroup analysis showed that the bone mineral density of the postmenopausal women with GG genotype of G1181C was lower than that of the postmenopausal women with GC and CC genotype. The results indicate that there is association between osteoprotegerin gene G1181C polymorphism and bone mineral density in postmenopausal women, and G allele is a risk factor for lower bone mineral density. Source

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