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Białystok, Poland

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Białystok, Poland
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News Article | May 30, 2017
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

In humans, developing metabolic disease, particularly type 2 diabetes, is correlated with having bacteria that penetrate the mucus lining of the colon, according to a study led by Drs. Benoit Chassaing and Andrew Gewirtz at Georgia State University. The findings, which provide insight on how people develop insulin resistance-associated dysglycemia (abnormal blood glucose levels), are published in the journal Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Metabolic syndrome is the term for a group of factors that raise a person's risk for heart disease and other health problems, such as diabetes and stroke. Such risk factors include a large waistline, a high triglyceride level (type of fat found in the blood), low HDL cholesterol level, high blood pressure and high fasting blood sugar levels. Metabolic syndrome, which has become far more common due to a rise in obesity rates among adults, is a leading risk factor for many serious, life-threatening diseases, including type 2 diabetes and heart disease, according to the National Institutes of Health. "Alterations in bacteria have been associated with metabolic diseases, including obesity and type 2 diabetes, but mechanisms remain elusive," said Gewirtz, professor in the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State. "Previous studies in mice have indicated that bacteria that are able to encroach upon the epithelium might be able to promote inflammation that drives metabolic diseases, and now we've shown that this is also a feature of metabolic disease in humans, specifically type 2 diabetics who are exhibiting microbiota encroachment." The epithelium is the mucus-lined cellular covering of internal and external surfaces of the body, including the intestinal tract. Gut microbiota is the collective term for the communities of microscopic living organisms that inhabit this environment. Gut microbiota that live in the outer regions of the mucus and remain a safe distance from epithelial cells provide a benefit to the host, but Chassaing and Gewirtz hypothesize that microbiota that encroach upon host cells drive chronic inflammation that interferes with the normal action of insulin, promoting type 2 diabetes. In this study, the researchers used samples from human subjects enrolled at the Veteran's Administration Hospital in Atlanta. The subjects, at least 21 years old with no major health problems besides diabetes, were undergoing colonoscopy for colon cancer screening. The researchers obtained each subject's history of diabetes and gastrointestinal complaints through interviews and reviewing medical records. During the colonoscopy procedure, two mucosal biopsies were taken from the left colon and analyzed. "The data are impressive and may have opened a new field of investigation in metabolic function and type 2 diabetes," said Dr. Samuel Klein, chief of the Division of Geriatrics and Nutritional Science at the Washington University School of Medicine Diabetes Research Center. The researchers are conducting follow-up studies to determine the identity of the bacteria that are invading the colon lining and are exploring remedies to prevent such bacteria encroachment. Chassaing, assistant professor in the Institute for Biomedical Sciences and Center for Inflammation, Immunity and Infection, is lead author of the study. Co-authors of the paper include Dr. Shreya M. Raja and Dr. Shanthi Srinivasan of Emory University School of Medicine and Dr. James D. Lewis of Perelman School of Medicine at University of Pennsylvania. The study is funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation.


News Article | May 30, 2017
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

In humans, developing metabolic disease, particularly type 2 diabetes, is correlated with having bacteria that penetrate the mucus lining of the colon, according to a study led by Benoit Chassaing and Andrew Gewirtz at Georgia State University. The findings, which provide insight on how people develop insulin resistance-associated dysglycemia (abnormal blood glucose levels), are published in the journal Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Metabolic syndrome is the term for a group of factors that raise a person’s risk for heart disease and other health problems, such as diabetes and stroke. Such risk factors include a large waistline, a high triglyceride level (type of fat found in the blood), low HDL cholesterol level, high blood pressure and high fasting blood sugar levels. Metabolic syndrome, which has become far more common due to a rise in obesity rates among adults, is a leading risk factor for many serious, life-threatening diseases, including type 2 diabetes and heart disease, according to the National Institutes of Health. “Alterations in bacteria have been associated with metabolic diseases, including obesity and type 2 diabetes, but mechanisms remain elusive,” said Gewirtz, professor in the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State. “Previous studies in mice have indicated that bacteria that are able to encroach upon the epithelium might be able to promote inflammation that drives metabolic diseases, and now we’ve shown that this is also a feature of metabolic disease in humans, specifically type 2 diabetics who are exhibiting microbiota encroachment.” The epithelium is the mucus-lined cellular covering of internal and external surfaces of the body, including the intestinal tract. Gut microbiota is the collective term for the communities of microscopic living organisms that inhabit this environment. Gut microbiota that live in the outer regions of the mucus and remain a safe distance from epithelial cells provide a benefit to the host, but Chassaing and Gewirtz hypothesize that microbiota that encroach upon host cells drive chronic inflammation that interferes with the normal action of insulin, promoting type 2 diabetes. In this study, the researchers used samples from human subjects enrolled at the Veteran’s Administration Hospital in Atlanta. The subjects, at least 21-years-old with no major health problems besides diabetes, were undergoing colonoscopy for colon cancer screening. The researchers obtained each subject’s history of diabetes and gastrointestinal complaints through interviews and reviewing medical records. During the colonoscopy procedure, two mucosal biopsies were taken from the left colon and analyzed. The study’s results have impressed leading experts in diabetes research. “The data are impressive and may have opened a new field of investigation in metabolic function and type 2 diabetes,” said Samuel Klein, chief of the Division of Geriatrics and Nutritional Science at the Washington University School of Medicine Diabetes Research Center. The researchers are conducting follow-up studies to determine the identity of the bacteria that are invading the colon lining and are exploring remedies to prevent such bacteria encroachment.


News Article | May 30, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

ATLANTA--In humans, developing metabolic disease, particularly type 2 diabetes, is correlated with having bacteria that penetrate the mucus lining of the colon, according to a study led by Drs. Benoit Chassaing and Andrew Gewirtz at Georgia State University. The findings, which provide insight on how people develop insulin resistance-associated dysglycemia (abnormal blood glucose levels), are published in the journal Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Metabolic syndrome is the term for a group of factors that raise a person's risk for heart disease and other health problems, such as diabetes and stroke. Such risk factors include a large waistline, a high triglyceride level (type of fat found in the blood), low HDL cholesterol level, high blood pressure and high fasting blood sugar levels. Metabolic syndrome, which has become far more common due to a rise in obesity rates among adults, is a leading risk factor for many serious, life-threatening diseases, including type 2 diabetes and heart disease, according to the National Institutes of Health. "Alterations in bacteria have been associated with metabolic diseases, including obesity and type 2 diabetes, but mechanisms remain elusive," said Gewirtz, professor in the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State. "Previous studies in mice have indicated that bacteria that are able to encroach upon the epithelium might be able to promote inflammation that drives metabolic diseases, and now we've shown that this is also a feature of metabolic disease in humans, specifically type 2 diabetics who are exhibiting microbiota encroachment." The epithelium is the mucus-lined cellular covering of internal and external surfaces of the body, including the intestinal tract. Gut microbiota is the collective term for the communities of microscopic living organisms that inhabit this environment. Gut microbiota that live in the outer regions of the mucus and remain a safe distance from epithelial cells provide a benefit to the host, but Chassaing and Gewirtz hypothesize that microbiota that encroach upon host cells drive chronic inflammation that interferes with the normal action of insulin, promoting type 2 diabetes. In this study, the researchers used samples from human subjects enrolled at the Veteran's Administration Hospital in Atlanta. The subjects, at least 21 years old with no major health problems besides diabetes, were undergoing colonoscopy for colon cancer screening. The researchers obtained each subject's history of diabetes and gastrointestinal complaints through interviews and reviewing medical records. During the colonoscopy procedure, two mucosal biopsies were taken from the left colon and analyzed. The study's results have impressed leading experts in diabetes research. "The data are impressive and may have opened a new field of investigation in metabolic function and type 2 diabetes," said Dr. Samuel Klein, chief of the Division of Geriatrics and Nutritional Science at the Washington University School of Medicine Diabetes Research Center. The researchers are conducting follow-up studies to determine the identity of the bacteria that are invading the colon lining and are exploring remedies to prevent such bacteria encroachment. Chassaing, assistant professor in the Institute for Biomedical Sciences and Center for Inflammation, Immunity and Infection, is lead author of the study. Co-authors of the paper include Dr. Shreya M. Raja and Dr. Shanthi Srinivasan of Emory University School of Medicine and Dr. James D. Lewis of Perelman School of Medicine at University of Pennsylvania. The study is funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation.


Nancy Craigmyle Honored as a Top Executive by Strathmore's Who's Who Worldwide Publication Vero Beach, FL, July 07, 2017 --( About Nancy Craigmyle Ms. Craigmyle, although retired after over 40 years of scientific research, continues to follow the scientific developments in her areas of interest. Her research concerns the changes in brain activity during “mindfulness” meditation and their underlying relationship to the beneficial effects of meditation. Ms. Craigmyle has explored in detail the interrelationship of the anterior cingulate with the integrated central and peripheral norepinephrine system, the principal neuromodulating system that optimizes attention and behavioral plasticity in changing environments and may contribute to the beneficial effects of meditation. She is an expert in meditation, salience detecting, anterior cingulate, locus coeruleus, sympathetic nervous system and norepinephrine. Her passion for her research is demonstrated in her continuing exploration. She recently published a paper on the physiological effects of meditation that has captured the attention of noteworthy professionals and key experts around the world. After obtaining a B.A. from Columbia University in New York City, she served as a research assistant in the The Laboratory of Physiological Psychology at The Rockefeller University, New York. Upon moving to South Carolina, she enrolled in the Ph.D. program in the Department of Physiological Psychology at the University of South Carolina, Columbia and worked as a research assistant in the Neuroscience Laboratory of the Veterans Administration Hospital. In her retirement, she enjoys life and continues to follow the scientific developments with respect to meditation. About Strathmore’s Who’s Who Worldwide Strathmore’s Who’s Who Worldwide highlights the professional lives of individuals from every significant field or industry including business, medicine, law, education, art, government and entertainment. Strathmore’s Who’s Who Worldwide is both an online and hard cover publication where we provide our members’ current and pertinent business information. It is also a biographical information source for thousands of researchers, journalists, librarians and executive search firms throughout the world. Our goal is to ensure that our members receive all of the networking, exposure and recognition capabilities to potentially increase their business. Vero Beach, FL, July 07, 2017 --( PR.com )-- Nancy Craigmyle of Vero Beach, Florida has been honored as a Top Executive for 2017 by Strathmore’s Who’s Who Worldwide for her outstanding contributions and achievements in the field of research.About Nancy CraigmyleMs. Craigmyle, although retired after over 40 years of scientific research, continues to follow the scientific developments in her areas of interest. Her research concerns the changes in brain activity during “mindfulness” meditation and their underlying relationship to the beneficial effects of meditation. Ms. Craigmyle has explored in detail the interrelationship of the anterior cingulate with the integrated central and peripheral norepinephrine system, the principal neuromodulating system that optimizes attention and behavioral plasticity in changing environments and may contribute to the beneficial effects of meditation. She is an expert in meditation, salience detecting, anterior cingulate, locus coeruleus, sympathetic nervous system and norepinephrine. Her passion for her research is demonstrated in her continuing exploration. She recently published a paper on the physiological effects of meditation that has captured the attention of noteworthy professionals and key experts around the world.After obtaining a B.A. from Columbia University in New York City, she served as a research assistant in the The Laboratory of Physiological Psychology at The Rockefeller University, New York. Upon moving to South Carolina, she enrolled in the Ph.D. program in the Department of Physiological Psychology at the University of South Carolina, Columbia and worked as a research assistant in the Neuroscience Laboratory of the Veterans Administration Hospital. In her retirement, she enjoys life and continues to follow the scientific developments with respect to meditation.About Strathmore’s Who’s Who WorldwideStrathmore’s Who’s Who Worldwide highlights the professional lives of individuals from every significant field or industry including business, medicine, law, education, art, government and entertainment. Strathmore’s Who’s Who Worldwide is both an online and hard cover publication where we provide our members’ current and pertinent business information. It is also a biographical information source for thousands of researchers, journalists, librarians and executive search firms throughout the world. Our goal is to ensure that our members receive all of the networking, exposure and recognition capabilities to potentially increase their business. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Strathmore Worldwide


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

WILMINGTON, N.C.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Pharmaceutical Product Development, LLC, (PPD) today announced it recently has added two new leaders in product development, strengthening the global contract research organization’s therapeutic expertise and ability to aid biopharmaceutical clients in delivering life-changing therapies to patients. “PPD’s global team of scientific, medical and strategic experts provides our clients expertise that helps reduce the cost and time associated with bringing medicines to market,” said Rob Dow, senior vice president of medical affairs for PPD. “By joining this team, these leaders deepen our expertise in neuroscience, pediatrics and rare diseases – areas that are very important to PPD and our customers.” Stephen Peroutka, M.D., Ph.D., has joined PPD to serve as vice president of global product development and therapeutic area head for neuroscience. Peroutka has served as an advisor and consultant to several biopharmaceutical companies. He previously served as chief medical officer at Semnur Pharmaceuticals and as chief medical officer and executive vice president of NeurogesX Inc. Earlier, he served as vice president of neurosciences for a large contract research organization (CRO); chief medical officer of Zogenix Inc.; franchise leader for pain conditions at Johnson & Johnson Inc.; founder, CEO and president of Synergia Pharma Inc.; and founder, CEO and president of Spectra Biomedical Inc., a startup focused on identification of genes in migraine, later acquired by GSK. Peroutka served as chief of the neurology service at the Palo Alto Veteran’s Administration Hospital. He earned both a medical and doctoral degree in pharmacology and experimental therapeutics from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Horacio Plotkin, M.D., FAAP, joined PPD as vice president of global product development in the pediatrics and rare diseases therapeutic area and also serves as medical lead for the Rare Disease and Pediatric Center of Excellence. Plotkin most recently served as global clinical development lead at Shire. Previously, he spent three years as chief medical officer of Retrophin, Inc., and held medical director positions at Alexion Pharmaceuticals, Enobia Pharma and Genzyme Corp. He spent 20 years as a practicing pediatrician in the field of pediatric rare diseases. Plotkin serves as adjunct associate professor of pediatrics and orthopedic surgery at the University of Nebraska School of Medicine. He earned his medical degree from the University of Buenos Aires School of Medicine. PPD is a leading global contract research organization providing comprehensive, integrated drug development, laboratory and lifecycle management services. Our clients and partners include pharmaceutical, biotechnology, medical device, academic and government organizations. With offices in 47 countries and more than 19,000 professionals worldwide, PPD applies innovative technologies, therapeutic expertise and a firm commitment to quality to help clients and partners bend the cost and time curve of drug development to deliver life-changing therapies that improve health. For more information, visit www.ppdi.com. Any statements made in this news release that are not statements of historical fact, including statements about the future performance of personnel, are forward-looking statements that involve a number of risks and uncertainties. These statements often include words such as “anticipate,” “expect,” “suggests,” “plan,” “believe,” “intend,” “estimates,” “targets,” “projects,” “should,” “could,” “would,” “may,” “might,” “will,” “forecast” and other similar expressions. The forward-looking statements contained in this news release are subject to and involve risks, uncertainties and assumptions, and therefore you should not place undue reliance on them. Although PPD believes these forward-looking statements are based on reasonable assumptions at the time they are made, many factors are beyond PPD’s ability to control or predict and could affect the outcome of the subject matter of this news release and our actual financial results, and therefore the outcome and results might differ materially from those expressed in the forward-looking statements. Additional factors that might materially affect the forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to: our ability to recruit, retain and motivate key personnel; the competitive nature of the drug development services industry; changes in trends in the biopharmaceutical industry; rapid technological changes that make our services less competitive or obsolete; the impacts of political, economic and/or regulatory changes on the health care industry; the fact that our backlog may not accurately predict or convert into service revenue; the termination, delay or change in scope of our contracts; industry, customer or therapeutic concentration; the pricing of and cost management of customer contracts; information and communication systems failures; contractual failures; regulatory and ethical standards failures; our ability to attract investigators and enroll patients in clinical trials; violations of laws governing privacy, conduct of clinical trials and/or other pharmaceutical research; competition between existing and potential customers; management of business restructurings and acquisitions; risk relating to the performance of drug development services and our insurance coverages, if any, for such risks; U.S. or international economic, currency, political and other risks; changes in existing or interpretations of tax laws; factors impacting the value of our goodwill and intangible assets; and other factors. PPD assumes no obligation and expressly disclaims any duty to revise or update any forward-looking statements, or make any new forward-looking statement, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as required by applicable law. PPD is not responsible for updating the information contained in this news release beyond the published date, or for changes made to this news release by wire services or internet service providers or any other party.


Andrzej R.,Medical University of Lublin | Piotr R.,Medical University of Lublin | Tomasz S.,Medical University of Lublin | Andrzej B.,Medical University of Lublin | And 3 more authors.
Annals of Noninvasive Electrocardiology | Year: 2010

Background: We studied the acute effect of pacing at the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT), right ventricular apex (RVA) and simultaneous RVA and RVOT-dual-site right ventricular pacing (DuRV) in random order on systolic function using impedance cardiography. Methods: Seventy-three patients (46 males), aged 52-89 years (mean 71.4 years) subjected to routine dual chamber pacemaker implantation with symptomatic chronic II or atrioventricular block, were included to the study. Results: DuRV pacing resulted in significantly higher cardiac index (CI) in comparison to RVOT and RVA and CI at RVOT was higher than at RVA pacing (2.46 vs 2.35 vs 2.28; P < 0.001). In patients with ejection fraction >50% significantly higher CI was observed during DuRV pacing when compared to RVOT and RVA pacing and there was no difference of CI between RVOT and RVA pacing (2.53 vs 2.41 vs 2.37; P < 0.001). In patients with ejection fraction <50%, DuRV and RVOT pacing resulted in significantly higher CI in comparison to RVA pacing while no difference in CI was observed between RVOT and DuRV pacing (2.28 vs 2.21 vs 2.09; P < 0.001). Conclusion: Dual-site right ventricular pacing in comparison to RVA pacing improved cardiac systolic function. RVOT appeared to be more advantageous than RVA pacing in patients with impaired, but not in those with preserved left ventricular function. No clear hemodynamic benefit of DuRV in comparison to RVOT pacing in patients with impaired systolic function was observed. © 2010, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Czarzasty W.,Administration Hospital | Kruszewski W.,Center of Oncology of Poland | Zielinski J.,Medical University of Gdańsk | Nianik M.,Administration Hospital
Polski Przeglad Chirurgiczny/ Polish Journal of Surgery | Year: 2011

Articles presenting treatment outcomes of stapled hemorrhoidopexy are rarely based on detailed analyses of the quality of life.The aim of the study was the assessment of changes within one year of treatment in the quality of life of patients who underwent stapled hemorrhoidopexy using QLQ-C30 form (version 3).Material and methods. 120 patients with grade III and IV internal hemorrhoidal disease treated with stapled hemorrhoidopexy were enrolled in the study. They answered questions from QLQ-C30 form and were subjected to examination a day before surgery and 1 day, 7 days, 4 weeks, 6 and 12 months after surgery. Assessment included operation site inspection, pain intensity measurement in VAS scale and parameters incorporated in QLQ-C30 form evaluation.Results. The overall quality of life decreased immediately after surgery (a day after 50% vs. 60% before surgery), but rapidly improved in one week and in one month periods (60% and 80% consecutively) reaching a plateau one month after surgery. Early complications occurred in 6 patients (5%). Recurrence of the disease was not observed. Bleeding from anastomosis site and severe pain in anal area immediately post surgery as a result of improper purse-string suture placement were the main complications.Conclusions. In patients with grade III or IV hemorrhoidal disease, stapled hemorrhoidopexy ensures a rapid improvement in the quality of life after surgery to the level experienced prior to the operation. 7-day convalescence period is sufficient. After one month, the overall quality of life improves significantly and reaches a plateau.


Luczynski W.,Medical University of Bialystok | Wawrusiewicz-Kurylonek N.,Medical University of Bialystok | Bossowski A.,Medical University of Bialystok | Ilendo E.,Medical University of Bialystok | And 3 more authors.
Kardiologia Polska | Year: 2011

Background: Much research has been done in the recent years to establish an association between obesity, metabolic syndrome and the immune system. Numerous data suggest that the decreased number and/or function of regulatory T cells (Treg cells) can lead to chronic minimal inflammation present in patients with obesity and trigger formation of atheroscleroticplaque. Aim: To generate Treg cells from the peripheral blood in children meeting the diagnostic criteria of metabolic syndrome. Methods: A total of 25 children with metabolic syndrome and 25 controls were enrolled in the study. Peripheral blood was collected, CD4 +/CD25- cells were separated and cultured for 4 weeks in the presence of a Treg expander (CD3/CD28) and interleukin-2. The expression of the transcription factor FoxP3 as a Treg marker was assessed before and after culture using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and flow cytometry. Results: Before the culture we observed a slightly lower percentage of Treg cells in children with metabolic syndrome vs controls. After the culture we noted a significant increase in mRNA expression and in the percentage of FoxP3-positive cells. We observed no differences in the results between the children with metabolic syndrome and the controls. Conclusions: Our study shows that it is possible to generate Treg cells from peripheral blood of children with metabolic syndrome. In future, these findings could be used to develop a model of immunotherapeutic intervention for patients at risk of cardiovascular disease. Copyright © Polskie Towarzystwo Kardiologiczne.


Pachowicz M.,Medical University of Lublin | Drozd J.,Administration Hospital | Belz M.,Medical University of Lublin | Maciejewski R.,Medical University of Lublin | Chrapko B.,Medical University of Lublin
Folia Morphologica (Poland) | Year: 2014

Coronary artery fistulae (CAF) are anomalies related to coronary artery abnormal termination. This is a very rare congenital malformation accounting for about 0.2-0.4% of congenital cardiac anomalies, but in some patients it can be haemodynamically important. Single-photon emission computed tomography or positron emission tomography myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using radioactive agents is widely used in clinical practice for cardiac ischaemia detection as a very sensitive and non-invasive tool. We are going to present 2 patients with bilateral CAFs to the pulmonary trunk without signs of the rest or stress ischaemia in MPI. Copyright © 2014 Via Medica


Cecil S.S.,Administration Hospital
Rehabilitation Nursing | Year: 2011

The following is a clinical narrative that describes one nurse's attempt to motivate a patient who had recently sustained an injury that caused quadriplegia and the practice implications that arose from "silo" thinking between disciplines.

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