Hoshi Pharmaceutical Co.

Shinagawa-ku, Japan

Hoshi Pharmaceutical Co.

Shinagawa-ku, Japan
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Akazaki N.,Hoshi Pharmaceutical Company | Akazaki N.,Hoshi University | Akachi N.,Hoshi Pharmaceutical Company | Sasaki Y.,Hoshi University | And 5 more authors.
Pharmacometrics | Year: 2012

Kumazasa Extract (HSBE) is a water-extract of leaves of genus Sasa spp.. This is a medicine, for which various effects are reported , including mending of ulcer, vasorelaxant, antiallergic, antibacterial, antitumor, and antiviral actions, as well as relief of diabetes. In our attempt to elucidate the molecular mechanism of these clinical efficacies, and in continuation of our recent study of the anti-inflammatory effects of HSBE, we have examined its anti-allergic effects. An allergic conjunctivitis was induced by a repeated application of ovalbumin on eyes of mice (type I allergy). An oral administration of HSBE (100 mg/kg, every day) caused a suppression of this allergy, so mat the conjunctivitis score became one half of the control on 18th day, and eye scratching behavior became one third of the control. In parallel with this anti-allergic effect, HSBE was found to cause reduction of Ig-E. The effect of HSBE on type IV allergic dermatitis was also examined . HSBE was found to inhibit the dermatitis induced by the application of oxazolone on ears of mice. Similar examinations have been repeated, not only with HSBE itself, but also with its high molecular weight (> 14,000) and low molecular weight (< 14,000) components as well as its methanol-soluble fraction obtained by adsorption chromatography. On the basis of a surveying the results of these experiments, discussions are given on the anti-allergic effects of HSBE.


Akazaki N.,Hoshi Pharmaceutical Company | Sasaki Y.,Hoshi University | Takeda H.,Hoshi University | Hosokawa T.,Hoshi University | And 4 more authors.
Pharmacometrics | Year: 2011

Kumazasa extract (HSBE) is a water-extract of leaves of bamboo of genus Sasa spp.. This is a medicine, for which various effects are reported, including mending of ulcer, vasorelaxant, antiallergic, antibacterial, antitumor, and antiviral actions, as well as relief of diabetes. In the present study, effects of HSBE on edemas have been examined. Two sorts of edemas have been subjected: edemas developed on a mouse foot by carrageenin, histamine, serotonin, bradykinin, and prostagrandinE2, and edemas resulting on ear of mouse by an application of 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). When HSBE was medicated, through oral administration, the edemas developed by carrageenin, serotonin, prostagrandinE2, and TPA were found to be suppressed with a proper dose schedule. For hunting reference data, the amounts of several cytokines and mediators were examined, in the course of each HSBE action, as the amount of mRNA coming out through the polymerase chain reaction. It was found that HSBE caused reductions of interleukin-6, interleukin-10, 5-lipoxygenase, cyclooxygenase-2, and tumor necrosis factor-α.


Hayashi K.,University of Toyama | Lee J.-B.,University of Toyama | Kurosaki Y.,University of Toyama | Nozawa M.,University of Toyama | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Functional Foods | Year: 2014

The fractions and polysaccharides from Sasa veitchii were evaluated for their preventive effects on influenza A virus (IFV-A) infection. In IFV-A infected mice, the high-molecular portion (SH) of hot-water extract from S.veitchii significantly reduced virus yields in lung and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and increased in IFV-A-specific secretory IgA in BALF and intestine samples, and neutralizing antibody titers in BALFs and sera. Separation of SH by combination with ion-exchange column and gel filtration yielded six purified polysaccharides. Among them, SH2A1B1 with molecular weight of 29.7kDa was found to reduce virus yields in lung as well as BALF in IFV-A-infected mice. A significant increase in the production of neutralizing antibody was also observed in BALFs on day 15 post-infection. Furthermore, significant enhancement of nitrite oxide production in RAW 264.7 cells was observed. These results suggest that the fractions from S.veitchii and SH2A1B1 could provide useful materials for prevention of IFV-A infection. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.


Sato W.,Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Science | Yoshida M.,Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Science | Yoshida M.,Hoshi Pharmaceutical Co. | Ishibashi K.-I.,Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Science | And 6 more authors.
International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms | Year: 2016

Fungal β-glucan is a representative pathogen-associated molecular pattern from mushroom, yeast, and fungi and stimulates innate as well as acquired immune systems. This β-glucan is widely applied in functional food to enhance immunity. Humans and animals generally become sensitized to this β-glucan and gradually produce specific antibodies to β-glucans. The extracts of plants have been used as folk medicine and are reported to possess various biological activities that are beneficial for human health, such as antitumor, antiallergic, and anti-inflammatory activities. In the present study, the immunochemical cross-reactivity of Sasa extract and fungal β-glucan was analyzed. We found that the anti-β-glucan antibody in human sera strongly cross-reacted with the Sasa extract. This result strongly suggested that plant extracts modulate the immunostimulating effects of medicinal mushrooms. The cooperative effects of plants and mushrooms may be an important issue for functional foods. © 2016 Begell House, Inc.


Yoshida M.,Hoshi Pharmaceutical Co. | Yoshida M.,Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Science | Hida T.H.,Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Science | Takeshita K.,Hoshi Pharmaceutical Co. | And 6 more authors.
International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms | Year: 2012

Fungal β-glucan is a representative pathogen-associated microbial pattern (PAMP) from mushroom, yeast, and fungi, and stimulates innate as well as acquired immune systems. It is a widely used functional food to enhance immunity. Such plant extracts have been known as folk medicines and reported to show various biological activities beneficial to human health, such as anti-tumor, anti-allergic, and anti-inflammatory activities. In the present study, the cooperative effect of bamboo water-soluble methanol precipitation (BWMP), a macromolecular fraction of the hot-water extract of Sasa veitchii (Japanese folk medicine Kumazasa), and the β-glucan from the medicinal mushroom Sparassis crispa (SCG) was analyzed in vitro using DBA/2 mice. The splenocytes from male DBA/2 mice were cultured with BWMP in the presence of SCG, and the responses were assessed by measuring cytokines. BWMP suppressed IFN-γ and GM-CSF production by SCG, but not TNF-α production. To analyze the specificity of the reaction, similar experiments were conducted with BWMP in the presence of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS); however, none of the cytokines were inhibited. Cytokine production of splenocytes by SCG was suggested to be largely dependent on the binding of lymphocytes with dendritic cells. Functions of BWMP were also analyzed by mixed lymphocyte reaction, and IFN-γ production was suppressed. These findings suggested that BWMP modulated the cell-to-cell contact induced by SCG and inhibited cytokine production. It is strongly suggested that the plant extracts modulate the immunostimulating effects of medicinal mushrooms. Cooperative effects of plants and mushrooms would be an important issue for functional foods. © 2012 Begell House, Inc.


PubMed | Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Science and Hoshi Pharmaceutical Co.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: International journal of medicinal mushrooms | Year: 2016

Fungal -glucan is a representative pathogen-associated molecular pattern from mushroom, yeast, and fungi and stimulates innate as well as acquired immune systems. This -glucan is widely applied in functional food to enhance immunity. Humans and animals generally become sensitized to this -glucan and gradually produce specific antibodies to -glucans. The extracts of plants have been used as folk medicine and are reported to possess various biological activities that are beneficial for human health, such as antitumor, antiallergic, and anti-inflammatory activities. In the present study, the immunochemical cross-reactivity of Sasa extract and fungal -glucan was analyzed. We found that the anti--glucan antibody in human sera strongly cross-reacted with the Sasa extract. This result strongly suggested that plant extracts modulate the immunostimulating effects of medicinal mushrooms. The cooperative effects of plants and mushrooms may be an important issue for functional foods.


PubMed | Tokyo University of Science, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Science and Hoshi Pharmaceutical Co.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: International journal of medicinal mushrooms | Year: 2015

Many plant extracts are used as well-known folk medicines and exhibit various biological activities that are beneficial to human health. These extracts contain polysaccharides, and some are pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) that stimulate innate as well as acquired immune systems. In the present study, the cooperative effects of PAMPs and bamboo water-soluble methanol precipitation (BWMP) in a macromolecular fraction of the hot water extract of Sasa veitchii (in Japanese folk medicine, known as Kumazasa; family Poaceae) were analyzed in vitro using the spleen or bone marrow cells of mice. The splenocytes of male DBA/2 and C57BL/6 mice were cultured with BWMP in the presence or absence of PAMPs, and responses were assessed by measuring cytokines. BWMP inhibited the production of interferon gamma (IFN-) by not only toll like receptors (TLRs), but also the C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) dectin-1 and dectin-2. BWMP also inhibited the autologous production of IFN- in the splenocyte culture. These results suggested that BWMP may inhibit the signaling pathways of PAMPs, but not ligand-receptor interactions. In contrast, BWMP did not inhibit the production of cytokines by dendritic cells. These results indicated that the inhibition of IFN- by BWMP was mediated through the cell-to-cell interactions of splenic cells during cultivation.


Okada Y.,Kyorin University | Okajima H.,Kyorin University | Takeshita K.,Hoshi Pharmaceutical Co. | Kanamori M.,Hoshi Pharmaceutical Co.
Journal of Food Science | Year: 2012

We examined the free radical scavenging activity of Sasa veitchii extract (Hoshi's Striped Bamboo Extract®, HSBE), well known in folk medicine as an efficient drug and antioxidant in detail. To evaluate the free radical scavenging activity of HSBE, its reactivity as hydrogen atom donor toward the 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl has been measured using stopped-flow spectrophotometry. It was found that the second-order rate constant, k2, obtained at 25 °C was 1.4 (g/L)-1s-1 for HSBE. To compare different chain-breaking antioxidants quantitatively, we obtained the second-order rate constant, k2′, on the molar basis of active hydroxyl groups in the tested substances. As a result, the k2′ values for HSBE, 6-hydroxy-2, 5, 7, 8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid (Trolox), caffeic acid, and (+)-catechin were 2.6 × 103, 2.0 × 103, 2.3 × 102, and 6.0 × 102 M-1s-1, respectively. These results show that HSBE and Trolox exerted the same free radical scavenging activity under these conditions. In addition, HSBE significantly inhibited the oxidation of methyl linoleate micelles in aqueous dispersions at 30 °C and its antioxidant activity (kinh) was more effective than those of caffeic acid and (+)-catechin. This is the first study on bamboo extracts in the context of radical scavenging activity that reports kinetic results. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®.


PubMed | Hoshi Pharmaceutical Co.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: International journal of medicinal mushrooms | Year: 2013

Fungal -glucan is a representative pathogen-associated microbial pattern (PAMP) from mushroom, yeast, and fungi, and stimulates innate as well as acquired immune systems. It is a widely used functional food to enhance immunity. Such plant extracts have been known as folk medicines and reported to show various biological activities beneficial to human health, such as anti-tumor, anti-allergic, and anti-inflammatory activities. In the present study, the cooperative effect of bamboo water-soluble methanol precipitation (BWMP), a macromolecular fraction of the hot-water extract of Sasa veitchii (Japanese folk medicine Kumazasa), and the -glucan from the medicinal mushroom Sparassis crispa (SCG) was analyzed in vitro using DBA/2 mice. The splenocytes from male DBA/2 mice were cultured with BWMP in the presence of SCG, and the responses were assessed by measuring cytokines. BWMP suppressed IFN- and GM-CSF production by SCG, but not TNF- production. To analyze the specificity of the reaction, similar experiments were conducted with BWMP in the presence of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS); however, none of the cytokines were inhibited. Cytokine production of splenocytes by SCG was suggested to be largely dependent on the binding of lymphocytes with dendritic cells. Functions of BWMP were also analyzed by mixed lymphocyte reaction, and IFN- production was suppressed. These findings suggested that BWMP modulated the cell-to-cell contact induced by SCG and inhibited cytokine production. It is strongly suggested that the plant extracts modulate the immunostimulating effects of medicinal mushrooms. Cooperative effects of plants and mushrooms would be an important issue for functional foods.


Trademark
Hoshi Pharmaceutical Co. | Date: 2010-12-28

Chemicals for industrial purposes, and for welding purposes; starch paste in the nature of an adhesive, other than for stationery or household purposes, and adhesives for wallpaper; plant growth regulating preparations; fertilizers; photographic supplies, namely, photographic chemicals, unexposed photographic film; artificial sweeteners; flour and starch for industrial purposes, namely, starch for use in the manufacture of paper or textiles, wood flour for use as a filler in the manufacture of plastics; anti-oxidants in the form of anti-oxidizing agents; proteins used in the manufacture of cosmetics; paste not for industrial use, namely, cellulose paste. Bleaching preparations for household use; deodorizing preparations, namely, deodorants for personal use; antistatic preparations for household purposes; stain removing benzene; fabric softeners for laundry use; laundry bleach; adhesives for affixing false hair; adhesives for affixing false eyelashes; laundry starch, seaweed gelatin for laundry use (funori); polishing preparations; soaps and detergents; dentifrices; cosmetics; perfumery; bleaching preparations for cosmetic purposes; deodorizing preparations for cosmetic purposes; deodorants for cosmetic purposes; bleaching preparations not for industrial use, namely, hair bleaching preparations, and tooth bleaching preparations. All purpose disinfecting and deodorizing preparations; Pharmaceutical preparations, namely, antidepressants, and anticoagulants; Oiled paper for medical purposes; Pharmaceutical wafers for diabetes, Gauze for dressing; Empty capsules for pharmaceuticals; Eyepatches for medical purposes; Ear bandages for skin wounds; Menstruation bandages; Menstruation tampons; Sanitary pads; Sanitary panties; Absorbent cotton for medical purposes; Adhesive plaster for medical purposes; bandages for dressings; collodion for pharmaceutical purposes; Breast-nursing pads; Dental materials, namely, dental alloys, and dental ceramics; Incontinence diapers; Mothproofing paper; Dietetic sugar for medical use, namely, lactose milk sugar; Lacteal flour for babies; Dietetic foods and beverages adapted for medical purposes; Medicines consisting of plant extracts for the treatment of Stomatitis, Gastrointestinal diseases, and Skin disease; medicines consisting of extracts from Kuma bamboo grass for the treatment of Stomatitis, Gastrointestinal diseases, and Skin disease; Deodorants other than for personal use, namely, household deodorant, and room deodorants; Foods for babies; dietary supplements, specifically dietary supplements consisting of plant extracts; dietary supplements consisting of extracts from Kuma bamboo grass kumazasa (Sasa veitchii); Adhesive tapes for medical purposes; Air freshening preparations; Air purifying preparations; Hygienic bandages for dressings; Bunion pads; Capsules sold empty for medicines and for pharmaceutical purposes; Cotton for medical purposes; absorbent pants for incontinence. Edible oils and fats; Milk; Milk products excluding ice cream, ice milk and frozen yogurt; Milk beverages not for medical purposes; Charcuterie; Processed seafood; Processed foods in granular, powdery, liquid, gelatinous, solid, tablet, or capsulated state consisting essentially of plant extracts for food purposes and not for medical purposes; Processed vegetables and fruits; Processed foods in granular, powdery, liquid, gelatinous, solid, tablet, or capsulated state consisting essentially of vegetables or fruits; Fried tofu pieces (abura-age); Freeze-dried tofu pieces (kohri-dofu); Jelly made from devils tongue root (konnyaku); Soy milk used as a milk substitute; Tofu; Fermented soybeans (natto); Processed eggs; Finished curry dishes containing meats, and vegetables; Stew and soup mixes; Dried flakes of laver for sprinkling on rice in hot water (ochazuke-nori); Seasoned powder for sprinkling on rice (furi-kake); Butter; Cheese; Margarine; Food products made from fish, namely, fish fillets, and fish sausages; Eggs. Curry mixes; Tea; Coffee and cocoa; Confectionery, namely, cookies, cakes, and candy; bread and buns; Seasonings; Spices; Cereal preparations, namely, oat flakes, and crushed oats; Processed foods in granular, powdery, liquid, gelatinous, solid, tablet, or capsulated state consisting essentially of cereal preparations consisting of processed grains added with plant extracts; Farinaceous foods for human consumption. Live fishing baits; fresh vegetables; Sugar crops, namely, sugar cane, fresh sugar beets; fresh fruits; unprocessed Foxtail millet; unprocessed Proso millet; unprocessed sesame seeds; unprocessed Buckwheat; unprocessed maize; unprocessed Japanese barnyard millet; unprocessed wheat; unprocessed barley and oats; Unprocessed rice; unprocessed Sorghum; Animal foodstuffs; live trees; live grasses; natural Turf; Dried flowers; Seedlings; Saplings; natural flowers; live pasture grass; Potted dwarfed trees (bonsai); Animal fattening preparations, namely, animal feed; Livestock fattening preparations, namely, livestock feed; Pet food; Fodder; unprocessed grains; unprocessed cereals; live plants; live Kuma bamboo grass. Beer, Non-alcoholic carbonated drinks, Fruit juices, Extracts of hops for making beer, Whey beverages, Vegetable juices and beverages. Alcoholic beverages except beers; sake; flavored tonic liquors; distilled spirits and beverages with a distilled alcoholic liquor base; liqueurs.

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