Austin, MN, United States
Austin, MN, United States

Hormel Foods Corporation is an American food company based in Austin, Minnesota that produces Spam luncheon meat. The company was founded as George A. Hormel & Company in Austin by George A. Hormel in 1891. It changed its name to Hormel Foods in 1993.Hormel sells food under many brands, including the Chi-Chi's, Dinty Moore, Farmer John, Herdez, Jennie-O, Lloyd's, Muscle Milk, Skippy, SPAM, La Victoria and Stagg brands, as well as under its own name. The company is listed on the Fortune 500. Wikipedia.


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News Article | May 1, 2017
Site: www.fooddive.com

The CR Magazine Corporate Citizenship database uses 260 data elements among seven categories to create its much anticipated list. Consumers take companies that present themselves as good corporate citizens and environmentally friendly seriously, so getting on the list is a big deal. A recent Nielsen global online study showed that millennials are willing to pay more for sustainable offerings and appreciate companies that concern themselves with being good stewards of the environment. The report also showed that 75% of consumers are not as concerned about price if something falls into the category. The two food companies in the top 10 have worked hard to bolster their corporate citizenship credentials. Over the last five years, Campbell has massively reduced its energy use and pollutant emissions. By 2020, the company wants to cut the environmental footprint of its product portfolio in half. In 2015, the company added renewable energy in two plants, recycled 84% of its waste, eliminated 316,000 pounds of packaging raw materials, and reduced water and emissions.​ Hormel Foods has continued to make strides in environmental impact reductions, animal welfare, health and wellness and philanthropy. Corporate responsibility is becoming more important to consumers, who tend to do their research about companies and support the ones with favorable policies. Nowadays, new policies in sustainability, sourcing or improved working conditions tend to help the environment, a company's employees and its bottom line.


It’s long been considered smart business practice to surround one’s self with people who make them look good. Many food and beverage manufacturers are applying this philosophy to their portfolios by aligning themselves with brands that appeal to today’s health-conscious consumer. These better-for-you companies benefit from strong “health halos,” or consumer perception that they are more authentic and nutritious than other companies. Many legacy brands are angling to capture some of that halo for themselves, sparking a wave of natural and organic brand acquisitions by industry power players. Dr Pepper Snapple recently acquired enhanced water manufacturer Bai Brands. In 2015, Hormel Foods bought Applegate Farms, a leader in natural and organic meats,  and General Mills picked up Annie’s Homegrown the year before that. Chris Konyk, business consultant at Salient Management Company, believes that it’s pivotal for major food and beverage brands to change their image because many consumers associate these companies with unhealthy, sugary products. “These companies finally got the message that people are looking to improve their health and are monitoring what they purchase for their families and eat or drink daily. They need an image makeover,” he told Food Dive. “The key will be how quick these manufactures can react and reposition themselves. The quickest way to realign to consumers and change their image is build their portfolio with items the consumers are seeking.” Christina Papale, vice president of strategy and director of innovation for branding agency CBX, said the “better-for-you” trend has grown, both in interpretation and cultural demand. “What was once considered a small pillar of a conventional portfolio is now a mass-culture table stake with consumers willing to pay more for options with cleaner ingredients and higher health benefits,” she told Food Dive. “The key is preemptively identifying cultural trends, scooping them up early on, then leveraging their core consumer base to further build and expand on the brands.” As consumer demand for healthier products increases, better-for-you brands are becoming more attractive to major food and beverage manufacturers as acquisition targets. “Consumers are changing the way that they eat, trading unhealthy items like sugary beverages and fast food for water and whole foods. Additionally, they are looking for healthier versions of the packaged foods they love (e.g., pretzels and cookies), like those containing whole grains or added nutrients,” Beth Vallen, associate professor of marketing and business law at Villanova School of Business, told Food Dive. “And it’s not only demand that is driving the trend, it’s the fact that people are willing to pay more for these foods that is driving the acquisition of these brands.” Vallen said that adding a better-for-you brand to a portfolio can create a halo effect for other, less healthy brands by association. Marie Chan, a partner at brand consulting firm Vivaldi, said that when companies acquire better-for-you brands, it’s important that they carefully consider what the acquisition will do. “With portfolio strategy, the BFY brand should have a clear role — meeting a different need-state, catering to a different consumer, offering different functional features/benefits, playing in a new daypart and/or new channel — to minimize cannibalization and brand overlap,” she told Food Dive by email. “Brand architecture is equally important. You must give consideration as to how much or how little emphasis will be placed on the corporate brand.” Developing a brand, as a rule, may take a large company one to two years to get a product off the ground. With this timeframe, the manufacturer could already be beaten by a smaller, more nimble competitor. “Acquisitions are the quickest and easiest way to cut that time down,” Konyk said. “A company’s success is their speed to market. Some companies that seem to have the speed and dexterity to beat out competition are Preferred Popcorn with K & W Popcorn acquisition, Danone acquiring WhiteWave, and Kashi with Pure of Holland.” Mondelez also acquired a brand with a health halo when it purchased allergen-free manufacturer Enjoy Life Foods in 2015. The hope was that it could help the company attract new consumers to its products. General Mills drove an early entry strategy by acquiring small natural brands. It started in 1999, acquiring Small Planet Foods and bringing brands like organic produce pioneer Cascadian Farms into its fold. Chan said that PepsiCo has also done a great job at diversifying its portfolio with better-for-you brands. She said the soda and snacking giant used its acquisitions to recognize that many consumers have different needs, tastes and wants. “You may want to start your day with a healthy breakfast from Quaker, but re-energize in the afternoon with Mountain Dew. Either way, PepsiCo has the products to fit your life,” she said. “What makes PepsiCo successful is that it’s segmented its portfolio into Fun for You, Good for You and Better for You, so that brands have a clear role to play in the portfolio and are afforded the right focus and resources.” Filiberto Amati, a partner at branding firm Amati & Associates, said that when a conventional food or beverage producer buys a better-for-you brand, it usually is hoping to tap into a profitable niche where it would typically have no credibility to operate. “Normally, they keep the brands separated, albeit they leverage their distribution muscle and product supply efficiency as catalysts for growth of the acquired brand,” he told Food Dive. “This may not do anything for the image, but it certainly does a lot for the pockets.” In many better-for-you acquisitions, Chan said, there is little to be gained from telling consumers about the acquisition upfront — like a label on products indicating animal welfare standard bearer Niman Ranch is a part of Perdue, or that organic and mission-based Annie’s is now a part of General Mills. In both cases, however, consumers benefit from greater distribution access and new products as a result of joining a much larger company. By partnering with deep-pocketed corporations, smaller brands can expand the regions they serve, the lines they offer and the number of retailers that carry their products. They also get some big money behind them, which can help with marketing and any unforeseen challenges that arise. Still, this strategy doesn’t come without consequences. While the appeal of having deeper pockets and a larger reach could be mouthwatering to a startup or small brand, once a deal goes through, the better-for-you brand could suffer if the parent company treats it like the other brands in its portfolio. “It could lose its street credibility and put off customers by following traditional promotional routes,” Amati said. “However, if a brand stays true to itself, then the acquired brand image is immune to the effects of being associated with a larger manufacturer. Kellogg's acquisition of organic cereal company, Kashi, did not give the company the exposure it wanted and led to a 35% market share loss to newer upstarts. Analysts say many consumers supported these better-for-you brands in the first place because they weren’t large food companies. These smaller companies offered products that placed values above profit. If these brands jump aboard with multinational megacompanies and private equity, devotees could view their favorite brands as compromising those values. “Many of these brands started out as small, independent brands, and consumers may be skeptical that quality, ingredients and overall product healthfulness will remain after an acquisition of this type,” Vallen said. “This is especially true if the acquiring company is not known for healthy food brands.” Papale noted the impact depends on the type of acquisition and how the cultures of both companies mesh together. While some companies keep the brands and business intact, running as-is with existing leadership and changes that are “invisible” to its employees or day-to-day operations, others are executed more publicly with massive implications from the top down. “However way these acquisitions are played out, it becomes clear pretty quickly who the new sheriff is and how that’ll affect staff rationalization, brand spend, product changes etc.,” she said. “As such, it is imperative that companies are as transparent as possible when it comes to their actions, motives and goals moving forward with all brands.” Konyk has seen large companies acquire smaller ones and destroy any value the new company would have provided. Additionally, over the years, he’s witnessed acquisitions of a smaller company and never heard, saw or read anything of the larger brand they represented. Orangina, a popular European brand made with a juice blend and lightly carbonated water was purchased by Dr Pepper Snapple in 2006. Once part of the larger company's portfolio, it became obscure and less popular in the U.S. Odwalla, a smoothie brand, also lost most of its traction with consumers once rolled into Coca-Cola’s product line. Sabra, makers of hummus spreads, is jointly owned by PepsiCo., and Israeli company Strauss. Eugenio Perrier, Sabra’s chief marketing officer, said he didn’t feel that PepsiCo interferes in Sabra’s operations at all. He also didn’t think the association with Pepsi reflected badly on Sabra — although understands that his brand helps Pepsi add more better-for-you products to its portfolio. “It has definitely given them [PepsiCo] openness to another part of the store—the perimeter of the store with our fresh offerings,” he told Food Dive. “We got with Pepsi the support of a company that was willing to advance growth. It’s a company that is in a good position to help us with distribution and management support.” An acquiring company needs to assess its objectives when deciding how to get the word out about a new BFY brand, Vallen said. If the objective is to grow sales of the acquired brand, care should be taken to ensure that association with the parent company does not erode consumer trust or perceptions of product healthfulness. Some manufacturers will issue a press announcement while others will keep it quiet. Papale said this can be a sensitive decision. Regardless of the action the larger manufacturer decides to take, consumers can still see it negatively. “No matter what is done, it’s important to try to communicate as authentically and truthfully as possible about the acquisition,” she said. “Packaging is a unique way for brands to signify the new merger, helping to tell a new story both to retailers and consumers. With new ownership often comes distribution, so creating some excitement in a tangible way the consumer will interact with is a good option.” In a perfect world, an acquisition helps both parties, Amati said. Ben & Jerry became truly global after the ice cream brand’s acquisition by Unilever, allowing the company to share its message on a larger scale. “Ideally, the acquisition is a win-win situation for all, allowing for wider distribution, the ability to leverage brand equity on both sides and an overall increase in consumer awareness,” he said. The "A Balancing Act" series is brought to you by BMO Harris Bank, a leader in commercial banking. To learn more about their Food & Beverage expertise, visit their website here. BMO Harris Bank has no influence over Food Dive's coverage.


Oklahoma-based OK Food, Inc., which produces ready-to-eat-chicken including Wal-Mart's Great Value brand, issued a recall of nearly 1 million pounds of its breaded chicken following reports from consumers of metal objects found inside the meat. Inspection at the processing plant revealed that the objects were from a metal conveyor belting. No case of injury or illness from eating the product has been reported so far but five customers have filed complaints. "The problem was discovered on March 21, 2017 after OK Foods Inc. received five consumer complaints stating that metal objects were found in the ready-to-eat chicken products and by FSIS inspection personnel during verification activities," the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) said in a statement. It isn't the first time that a foreign object has been found inside food. Several food companies have also issued recalls because of potentially dangerous foreign objects that are in (or possibly got into) their food products. Glass fragments appear to commonly contaminate and pose potential safety concerns for packaged food and beverage products. In January this year, for instance, glass hazards prompted one of the largest craft brewers in the   United States to issue a recall of some of its bottled beer. Sierra Nevada Brewing Co., recalled the products as a precautionary measure because the packaging flaw can potentially cause injury to its consumers. In April last year, the Food and Drug Administration warned consumers that there may be shards of glass in 8-ounce jars of All Nice! sliced peaches and mixed fruits that were distributed at Walgreens store. The contaminants could cut or injure consumers if ingested. Sweet Leaf Tea Company also recalled bottles of tea products in 2015 over concerns that a glass breakage incident that occurred during a filling process may have entered some of the bottled products. In November 2015, Campbell Soup Company also recalled some of its SpaghettiOs Original cans because the affected products have tiny red plastic pieces inside it. The plastic pieces came from some parts of the can's lining. A month prior to Campbell's recall, Hormel Foods also announced removing some of its Skippy peanut butter from store shelves because of the possibility that some jars have small metal shavings that were detected through a magnet check during routine cleaning. Huisken Meat Company also recalled some of its Sam's Choice Black Angus Vidalia Onion items over concerns that they have wood materials that came from an ingredient and was found during production. Between 1972 and 1997, the Health Hazard Evaluation Board of the FDA evaluated about 190 cases of sharp or hard foreign objects in food. While these objects pose risks, certain objects rarely cause serious damage. "The Board found that foreign objects that are less than 7 mm, maximum dimension, rarely cause trauma or serious injury except in special risk groups such as infants, surgery patients, and the elderly," the FDA said. "Hard or sharp natural components of a food ( e.g. bones in seafood, shell in nut products) are unlikely to cause injury." © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | May 1, 2017
Site: www.fooddive.com

The CR Magazine Corporate Citizenship database uses 260 data elements among seven categories to create its much anticipated list. Consumers take companies that present themselves as good corporate citizens and environmentally friendly seriously, so getting on the list is a big deal. A recent Nielsen global online study showed that millennials are willing to pay more for sustainable offerings and appreciate companies that concern themselves with being good stewards of the environment. The report also showed that 75% of consumers are not as concerned about price if something falls into the category. The two food companies in the top 10 have worked hard to bolster their corporate citizenship credentials. Over the last five years, Campbell has massively reduced its energy use and pollutant emissions. By 2020, the company wants to cut the environmental footprint of its product portfolio in half. In 2015, the company added renewable energy in two plants, recycled 84% of its waste, eliminated 316,000 pounds of packaging raw materials, and reduced water and emissions.​ Hormel Foods has continued to make strides in environmental impact reductions, animal welfare, health and wellness and philanthropy. Corporate responsibility is becoming more important to consumers, who tend to do their research about companies and support the ones with favorable policies. Nowadays, new policies in sustainability, sourcing or improved working conditions tend to help the environment, a company's employees and its bottom line.


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: marketersmedia.com

The analysts forecast the global frozen food market to grow at a CAGR of 6.15% during the period 2017-2021. Frozen foods are packaged food items that are prepared by freezing the foods to preserved them from the time of their preparation to consumption. The freezing process is usually of two types: mechanical (with a freezing temperature of -30 °F) or flash freezing/cryogenic (with a freezing temperature of -160 °F; this process is usually used for large quantities). With the increasing hectic schedules of consumers and the subsequent demand for quick meals, the popularity of convenience food products is increasing. Improving living standards, growth of urban settlements, and growing working women population is also adding to this new trend in the global frozen food market. For more information or any query mail at sales@wiseguyreports.com The report covers the present scenario and the growth prospects of the global frozen food market for 2017-2021. To calculate the market size, the report considers the revenue generated through the sales of frozen foods sold to individual customers as well as to foodservice customers through various retail outlets, which include, but are not limited to, hypermarkets, supermarkets, convenience stores, independent retailers, discount stores, warehouse clubs, and online channel. The market is divided into the following segments based on geography: • Americas • APAC • EMEA The report, Global Frozen Food Market 2017-2021, has been prepared based on an in-depth market analysis with inputs from industry experts. The report covers the market landscape and its growth prospects over the coming years. The report also includes a discussion of the key vendors operating in this market. Other prominent vendors • Ajinomoto Windsor • General Mills • Greencore • Kraft Heinz • Hormel Foods • Iceland Foods • Nomad Foods Europe • Nestlé • FINDUS • The Hain Celestial • The Schwan Food Company • 2 Sisters Food Market driver • Rising urbanization leading to demand for convenient food products. • For a full, detailed list, view our report Market challenge • Increase in consumer preference for fresh food. • For a full, detailed list, view our report Market trend • Rise in demand for gluten-free products. • For a full, detailed list, view our report Key questions answered in this report • What will the market size be in 2021 and what will the growth rate be? • What are the key market trends? • What is driving this market? • What are the challenges to market growth? • Who are the key vendors in this market space? • What are the market opportunities and threats faced by the key vendors? • What are the strengths and weaknesses of the key vendors? PART 05: Market segmentation by product type • Global frozen ready-to-eat meals market • Global frozen meat and poultry market • Global frozen fish and seafood market • Global frozen fruits and vegetables market • Global frozen potato products market • Global frozen soup market • Global frozen food market by geography PART 06: Geographical segmentation • Frozen food market in EMEA • Frozen food market in Americas • Frozen food market in APAC PART 10: Drivers and challenges • Market drivers • Impact of drivers on key customer segments • Market challenges • Impact of challenges on key customer segments For more information or any query mail at sales@wiseguyreports.com ABOUT US: Wise Guy Reports is part of the Wise Guy Consultants Pvt. Ltd. and offers premium progressive statistical surveying, market research reports, analysis & forecast data for industries and governments around the globe. Wise Guy Reports features an exhaustive list of market research reports from hundreds of publishers worldwide. We boast a database spanning virtually every market category and an even more comprehensive collection of rmaket research reports under these categories and sub-categories. For more information, please visit https://www.wiseguyreports.com


An extended shelf life sandwich and a method of forming the sandwich is provided. The method includes processing meat to be used in the sandwich. The processing includes: applying a humectant to a meat; acidulating the meat; drying the meat until a water activity of no less than 0.85 is achieved. The process is completed by wrapping the processed meat into a bread-type product.


Patent
Hormel Foods | Date: 2013-03-12

A fire searing process for meat comprises cooking meat in an oven and then at least crust-freezing the meat in a freezer. The oven has a temperature of at least 1500 F., and the meat is cooked in the oven for approximately 10 seconds to 3 minutes. The meat is cooked to a depth of approximately 0.25 to 25% of the meat extending into an inner surface of the meat from an outer surface of the meat to form a crust-like portion proximate the outer surface of the meat. The meat is then at least crust-frozen in a freezer having a temperature of approximately 35 to 0 F. for approximately 1 to 6 minutes. The freezer prevents the meat from being further cooked to preserve the crust-like portion proximate the outer surface of the meat.


Patent
Hormel Foods | Date: 2012-10-26

A sanitizer assembly for foot wear is provided that includes a base platform, a plurality of nozzles and an activation pump. The base platform includes a grate upon which footwear can be placed. The plurality of nozzles are positioned under the grate. The nozzles are configured and arranged to dispense a fine mist of alcohol-based sanitizer on the footwear. The activation pump is in fluid communication with the plurality of nozzles. The activation pump is further in fluid communication with a supply of alcohol-based sanitizer. In addition, the activation pump is configured and arranged to pump the alcohol-based sanitizer to the nozzles.


A method for coating a food product comprises placing a food product including fat and moisture in a vacuum mixer, applying low temperature heat to the food product to create a heated food product, the low temperature heat being below a melting point of the fat in the food product, applying vacuum to the heated food product, adding a first flavoring to the vacuum mixer, and applying vacuum to the heated food product and the first flavoring to create a first coated food product.


Patent
Hormel Foods | Date: 2014-05-28

A method for smoking meat comprises applying a dry smoke powder to an exterior surface of a meat to create a treated meat, inserting the treated meat into a cooking bag, sealing the cooking bag to create a bagged meat, and cooking the bagged meat with steam to a desired internal temperature of the meat.

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