APHP Hopital Pitie Salpetriere

Paris, France

APHP Hopital Pitie Salpetriere

Paris, France
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Gallot G.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Gallot G.,Nantes University Hospital Center | Vollant S.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Saiagh S.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | And 18 more authors.
Journal of Immunotherapy | Year: 2014

We report herein the results we obtained and the limitations we experienced during the production and use of a bank of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed human cytotoxic T lymphocytes (EBV-CTLs). To assess the feasibility and toxicity of this strategy, we selected and stored, in liquid nitrogen, 4 billion EBV-CTLs from each of the 13 selected donors. Subsequently, in a multicenter phase I/II study, 11 patients with EBV-associated lymphoma resistant to conventional treatments received 1-3 doses of 5 million EBV-CTLs/kg with 1-3 and 0-4 compatibilities for human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-I and HLA-II, respectively. Except for one event of fever after injection, no immediate or delayed toxicity, no graft versus host disease, and no graft rejection attributable to CTL infusion were observed. Three patients presented complete remission and 1 partial remission after treatment. Considering the clinical options currently available, and the constrains associated with CTL preparation and implementation, we conclude that CTL banks should consist of a reasonably small number of cell lines with documented specificities. This objective could be more easily achieved if the few homozygous donors for the most frequent HLA alleles of the targeted population could be made available for such a project. Copyright © 2014 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.


Mauprivez C.,Groupe Hospitalier Pitie Salpetriere | Mauprivez C.,University Paris Diderot | Amor M.S.,Groupe Hospitalier Pitie Salpetriere | Khonsari R.H.,APHP Hopital Pitie Salpetriere | Khonsari R.H.,Paris-Sorbonne University
Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery | Year: 2015

Stafne bone cavities (SBCs) are mandibular radiolucent lesions with challenging differential diagnoses. Many radiologic methods have been proposed to visualize the presence of salivary gland tissues inside the cavities. This report describes a case of bilateral angular mandibular radiolucent cavities located below the mandibular nerve canal. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed continuity between the submandibular glands and the tissue herniated into the cavities. The ductal system of the 2 submandibular glands was evaluated using MR sialography. MR sialography depicted opacification of the glandular ductal system distinct from the contents of the cavities up to its primary branches, confirming the diagnosis of SBC. MR sialography visualized the submandibular gland ducts and the presence of salivary gland tissue inside the mandibular cavities with precise topographic information. This technique does not involve cannulation or injection of contrast agents and does not expose a patient to radiation. MR sialography is a valuable addition to the common imaging procedures used in the investigation of SBCs. © 2015 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons.


Lemal R.,CHU Clermont Ferrand | Lemal R.,Estaing University Hospital Center | Bard-Sorel S.,CHU Clermont Ferrand | Montrieul L.,CHU Clermont Ferrand | And 25 more authors.
Modern Pathology | Year: 2016

The oncogenic role of TCL1 in chronic lymphocytic leukemia is well established in transgenic mice. TCL1 expression in other B-cell malignancies has been also described: post-germinal center-derived malignancies, such as multiple myeloma, classically do not express TCL1. Waldenström macroglobulinemia is a post-germinal center malignancy that is known to be similar to chronic lymphocytic leukemia in terms of its gene expression profile. TCL1 expression has not been so far assessed in Waldenström macroglobulinemia. Transcriptomic explorations show that TCL1A expression is linked to signaling pathways and biological functions that are known to be involved in Waldenström macroglobulinemia as well as to gene signatures of interest in B-cell malignancies. We investigated TCL1 expression at the protein level in the bone marrow of a series of 59 patients with Waldenström macroglobulinemia: 76% of patients expressed TCL1, which appeared to be associated with a pejorative prognostic impact. TCL1 could have an oncogenic role in Waldenström macroglobulinemia, and deserves further exploration. © 2016 USCAP, Inc All rights reserved.


PubMed | APHP Hopital Pitie Salpetriere, CHU Clermont Ferrand, Service des Maladies du Sang, Clermont University and 4 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Modern pathology : an official journal of the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology, Inc | Year: 2015

The oncogenic role of TCL1 in chronic lymphocytic leukemia is well established in transgenic mice. TCL1 expression in other B-cell malignancies has been also described: post-germinal center-derived malignancies, such as multiple myeloma, classically do not express TCL1. Waldenstrm macroglobulinemia is a post-germinal center malignancy that is known to be similar to chronic lymphocytic leukemia in terms of its gene expression profile. TCL1 expression has not been so far assessed in Waldenstrm macroglobulinemia. Transcriptomic explorations show that TCL1A expression is linked to signaling pathways and biological functions that are known to be involved in Waldenstrm macroglobulinemia as well as to gene signatures of interest in B-cell malignancies. We investigated TCL1 expression at the protein level in the bone marrow of a series of 59 patients with Waldenstrm macroglobulinemia: 76% of patients expressed TCL1, which appeared to be associated with a pejorative prognostic impact. TCL1 could have an oncogenic role in Waldenstrm macroglobulinemia, and deserves further exploration.

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