Redwood City, CA, United States
Redwood City, CA, United States

HopeLab is a 501 private operating foundation based in Redwood City, CA. HopeLab researches and develops technology-based products to improve human health and well-being. The foundation now focuses on resilience research as part of a strategy to design products that support the psychological and biological health of individuals and communities. The foundation was established in 2001 by Pam Omidyar and is part of the Omidyar Group of philanthropic enterprises founded and funded by Pam and her husband Pierre Omidyar, founder and chairman of eBay.HopeLab has been named a Social Enterprise of the Year by Fast Company magazine and was recognized by President Barack Obama and the White House Office of Social Innovation and Civic Participation for pioneering work to improve the health of young people. For her work with HopeLab, Pam Omidyar received the inaugural Peter Samuelson Award for Innovation at the Starlight Children's Foundation in 2007. Wikipedia.


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News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

"Just last year the ILN celebrated its tenth anniversary in making health care more innovative," said Lisa Schilling, RN, MPH, Kaiser Permanente's vice president of quality and care delivery effectiveness. "We are excited to see the ILN enter this next phase as they continue to guide learnings within a thriving international community." The more than 45 member organizations share innovative solutions and cutting-edge design techniques via both virtual and in-person programming. In 2016, ILN connected more than 2,100 innovators. These connections have led to collaborations such as ILNVideoVisits, a monthly forum focused on telemedicine, and ILNlocal, a series of local meetups for individuals and organizations to collaborate and share ideas. "The Innovation Learning Network is an inspiring example of how organizations can collaborate to share innovation knowledge and practice," said Margaret Laws, HopeLab president and CEO. "We are excited to have ILN join HopeLab; their dedication to working across organizations to create meaningful improvements in health and well-being for patients is strongly aligned with our mission." For more information about the Innovation Learning Network and to learn about upcoming events and how to join, visit ILN.org. About HopeLab HopeLab is a non-profit operating foundation focused on improving the health and well-being of children and young adults. Our unique approach to driving positive health outcomes combines behavioral science, deep human engagement, and strategic partnerships to achieve broad impact. We partner with leaders in health care, academic research, and design to create innovative interventions that are inspired by hope and realized by science. HopeLab was founded in 2001 is part of The Omidyar Group, which represents the philanthropic, personal, and professional interests of the Omidyar family. Learn more at www.hopelab.org About The Innovation Learning Network The Innovation Learning Network is an organization-based membership network made up of healthcare systems, health foundations, safety net providers, design/innovation firms, and tech companies. Although their individual missions vary, all of our member organizations carry a common goal: to make healthcare better through good design. Learn more at www.iln.org. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/hopelab-joins-forces-with-the-innovation-learning-network-300457869.html


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The eight leading pediatric healthcare institutions hosting the annual Impact Pediatric Health pitch competition today announced the ten startup company finalists who will compete March 13. The pediatric tech startups will be competing for one of two $15,000 prizes, and all will benefit from invaluable feedback from a host of industry experts serving as judges at the event, as well as the sponsoring children’s hospitals. Any Interactive or Platinum SXSW badge holder many attend the Monday, March 13 event in the Startup Village at the Hilton Downtown Austin. For more, see http://impactpediatrichealth.com/ The ten finalists represent the best in digital health and medical device innovation focused on the pediatric market and include: Eight leading U.S. Children’s Hospitals – Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, Boston Children’s Hospital, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Seattle Children's Hospital, Stanford Children’s Health and Texas Children's Hospital – came together to create Impact Pediatric Health, a one-of-a-kind pitch competition to help showcase, and support, the best pediatric health care innovations. These children’s hospitals lead the U.S. News & World Report “Best Children’s Hospitals” rankings. SXSW is working with these leading pediatric hospitals on the event which is part of Startup Village, http://www.sxsw.com/interactive/startup-village, at the Hilton Downtown Austin. In its first year, 2015, Mark Cuban emceed and was one of the judges who selected CareAline as the best of 10 finalists. Last year featured Steve Case, co-founder of AOL and Chairman and CEO of Revolution, as co-emcee, along with Dr. Jordan Shlain. The emcees, and other judges, selected Cohero Health as the winner. This year, one of the event emcees is Daniel Kraft, MD, a well-regarded physician scientist who is Chair for Medicine at Singularity University, as well as Founder and Chair, Exponential Medicine. “In its first two years at the SXSW Health Track, Impact Pediatric Health has earned a reputation for bringing together the leaders of pediatric medical technology innovations of today and those shaping the future,” said Hugh Forrest, SXSW Chief Programming Officer. “In a rare alignment, eight hospitals are collaborating to support, encourage and foster innovation for pediatric solutions. It is great to see the best pediatric health care and research institutions helping next generation companies accelerate their businesses. Initiatives like this will help ensure our youngest patients always get the very best care possible.” Impact Pediatric Health showcases technologies that will deliver solutions specifically created for young patients. The ten finalist startup CEOs will have three minutes to pitch how their company is solving unique health care needs of children, from babies to teens. The stage presentation on Monday, March 13, 2017 will be followed by questions from the emcees and judges. A winner among the ten finalists will be announced at the end of the event. All participating companies will have the opportunity to meet one-on-one with the presenting pediatric hospitals. You must have a SXSW Interactive or Platinum badge to attend this March 13 event. This event is possible thanks to the eight leading pediatric hospitals, as well as organizations like HopeLab and REDI Cincinnati that helps support growing biohealth companies in Greater Cincinnati. About Impact Pediatric Health: Now in its third year, Impact Pediatric Health hosts a one-of-a-kind pitch competition held annually at SXSW dedicated to showcasing and supporting the best pediatric healthcare innovations. Eight of the largest and top-ranked (according to US News and World Report) children’s hospitals in the U.S. came together to create Impact Pediatric Health. These leading hospitals collaborate to help next generation pediatric healthcare companies, especially those focused on digital health and medical devices, accelerate their businesses. For more information see http://impactpediatrichealth.com/ About SXSW SXSW dedicates itself to helping creative people achieve their goals. Founded in 1987 in Austin, Texas, SXSW is best known for its conference and festivals that celebrate the convergence of the interactive, film, and music industries. The event, an essential destination for global professionals, features sessions, showcases, screenings, exhibitions, and a variety of networking opportunities. SXSW proves that the most unexpected discoveries happen when diverse topics and people come together. The Health Track at SXSW focuses on innovations that build and support the ecosystem of patients, providers, payers, policy makers, designers, entrepreneurs, and investors to improve outcomes in health and healthcare. SXSW 2017 will take place March 10-19, 2017. SXSW 2017 is sponsored by Esurance, Mazda, Monster Energy, Bud Light, Capital One, McDonald’s, The Austin Chronicle, and Sonicbids.


Cole S.W.,HopeLab | Yoo D.J.,Stanford University | Knutson B.,Stanford University
PLoS ONE | Year: 2012

This study sought to determine whether playing a "serious" interactive digital game (IDG) - the Re-Mission videogame for cancer patients - activates mesolimbic neural circuits associated with incentive motivation, and if so, whether such effects stem from the participatory aspects of interactive gameplay, or from the complex sensory/perceptual engagement generated by its dynamic event-stream. Healthy undergraduates were randomized to groups in which they were scanned with functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI) as they either actively played Re-Mission or as they passively observed a gameplay audio-visual stream generated by a yoked active group subject. Onset of interactive game play robustly activated mesolimbic projection regions including the caudate nucleus and nucleus accumbens, as well as a subregion of the parahippocampal gyrus. During interactive gameplay, subjects showed extended activation of the thalamus, anterior insula, putamen, and motor-related regions, accompanied by decreased activation in parietal and medial prefrontal cortex. Offset of interactive gameplay activated the anterior insula and anterior cingulate. Between-group comparisons of within-subject contrasts confirmed that mesolimbic activation was significantly more pronounced in the active playgroup than in the passive exposure control group. Individual difference analyses also found the magnitude of parahippocampal activation following gameplay onset to correlate with positive attitudes toward chemotherapy assessed both at the end of the scanning session and at an unannounced one-month follow-up. These findings suggest that IDG-induced activation of reward-related mesolimbic neural circuits stems primarily from participatory engagement in gameplay (interactivity), rather than from the effects of vivid and dynamic sensory stimulation. © 2012 Cole et al.


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

REDWOOD CITY, Calif., March 2, 2017 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- HopeLab, the progressive health-focused R&D organization of The Omidyar Group, today announced Chris McCarthy as its new vice president of strategy and innovation. A leader in healthcare design strategy, McCarthy...


News Article | October 20, 2015
Site: www.xconomy.com

Welltok has acquired a health tool for children and their families called Zamzee that it plans to incorporate into its health optimization software called CaféWell. Terms of the deal weren’t disclosed. Zamzee attempts to engage children through games, allowing them to use an activity tracker as they attempt to complete challenges that require physical activity. Denver-based Welltok’s CaféWell program helps organize health and condition management programs, and uses social, gaming, and cognitive techniques to try to engage users, the company says. Welltok purchased Zamzee from HopeLab, a Redwood City, CA-based nonprofit focused on creating technology that improves health. HopeLab was created by Pam Omidyar as the R&D organization of The Omidyar Group, which Pam created with her husband Pierre, the founder of eBay and media organizations Honolulu Civil Beat and First Look Media. This is the most recent in a string of acquisitions for Welltok, which includes Burlington, MA-based machine learning company Predilytics and Seattle-based mobile healthcare app Mindbloom. David Holley is Xconomy's national correspondent based in Austin, TX. You can reach him at dholley@xconomy.com Follow @xconholley


News Article | December 13, 2013
Site: www.cultofmac.com

Marc Brackett wants to put a Mood Meter on every smartphone. That way, in addition to helping us get through our daily lives, iPhones can make us more attuned to why and when we feel cheerful, tired or annoyed. The director of the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence has been working with a team from HopeLab on an app with a simple interface where users rate their energy and pleasantness using four colors and a five-point scale. He tested it out on conference goers Stanford’s first ever Technology and Compassion conference, organized by the Center for Compassion And Altruism Research And Education. Asking for a show of hands, most participants noted they were somewhere in the green (pleasant) perhaps creeping up towards yellow (high energy). If you’re at all like New Yorker Brackett, you’ll frequently find yourself in the red. And that’s a not necessarily a bad thing. “I like being angry. It drives me to change education policy,” Brackett said. His presentation substituted a scheduled one about empathy and video games. Despite the pinch hit, his talk resonated strongly with participants and echoed several of the ideas presented in the projects presented in a later competition. Speaking with Brackett afterwards, I wondered whether my own first reaction — which usually involves some gradation of annoyed (irritated, peeved, irated) would move into another realm through diligent tracking. “Not really, but that’s all right. To a certain extent if you can name it, you can tame it. But compassion for all of your states is a better goal.” Brackett recounted his own struggle with mood states, realizing he doesn’t like to be in the yellow (high energy, high pleasantness) after experimenting with it in a Crossfit class. “I’m not pumped like the trainer, or the rest of the guys. I’m never going to be like that. I’m a red or blue kind of guy.” The app (digital mood ring 2.o?) is expected to be available for public consumption by April 2014, if not sooner, in Android and iOS versions. It’ll face competition from dozens of mood tracking apps on the market – ranging from MoodyMe to The National Center for Telehealth & Technology’s T2 Mood Tracker. While many of the ideas presented during the conference weren’t new — at least if you’ve been to a few meet-ups or tech accelerator showcases in the Bay Area — it comes at a time when the tech boom is seen as an antagonistic force rather than a one that helps change society change for the better. You’re going about your business on a regular workday when a text message pops up on your iPhone from an anonymous number: “Stop texting me you jerk!” How would you answer? If you participated in a study from the University of Michigan about empathy, there are higher chances you might text something back like “Sorry you’re having a bad day! I think you’ve got the wrong number.” Sara Konrath, an assistant research professor of psychology at the University of Michigan, says the results of the study that used texting prompts to “train” people in compassion were not conclusive, but the follow-up done six months after the conclusion of the study with the potentially hackle-raising text shows that our phones may help smooth out the rougher edges of our personalities. “Men in particular less likely to agree that aggression was a good thing,” Konrath said. “It increases pro-social behavior, but not necessarily empathy.” As part of the texting research, part of the John Templeton Foundation’s Character Project, participants thumbed their way through exercises designed to test for empathy reactions. Six times a day, they reported mood, feelings of connectedness, the number of people interacted with since the last text message and several other factors. Some were prompted to text messages that were empathy boosters (“send a nice text to someone close, try to make them feel loved”) while others were asked to reflect on someone they had trouble getting along with. Konrath says that while empathy is heritable to an extent, she likens it to a muscle we can all work on strengthening. Conference goers found the results intriguing. “I can imagine structuring peer review around this concept and helping my students approach each other’s work more constructively, with greater focus on how they can become compassionate responders,” said Alyssa J. O’Brien a lecturer in Writing and Rhetoric at Stanford. Next up for Konrath? Trying to compare face-to-face empathy with text messages and possibly work on an app. Because we’re all different IRL. During the second half of the one-day conference, apps in the empathy space killed each other with kindness in a friendly competition. (Several of the speakers gave a nod to the other presenters and their ideas, opening the doors for collaboration once the gloves were off.) The 10 finalists each got a chance to tell judges and conference goers, who could vote by text message, why their idea would extend the reach of compassion with tech. High school senior Sam Reiss was a shoe-in for first place, with a project that brings pen pals to the generation that grew up with Skype. Dubbed X-Change the World, its goals include “enhancing the cultural and global spectrum of youth throughout the world, improving the level of conversational English of our participants and building cross-cultural bridges that lead to greater global curiosity and compassion.” The platform pairs students from the U.S. with teens in countries including Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, Tanzania and Kenya in a virtual classroom. The project, which already won second place in a national youth service challenge, walked off with the $10,000 prize. Two other projects won $5,000 each plus a consultation with a a growth capital fund exec and a chance to meet the Dalai Lama. They included a taxi game called Compassion in Motion and wellness tracker SeekChange, which includes Siri-like component called Dara to track your moods and activities.


News Article | April 8, 2014
Site: www.fastcompany.com

Innovative companies like Apple and Google are held up as shining bastions of positive company culture, while other companies struggle to come to terms with the very idea. But the reason why so many fail is that they treat a positive culture as an extra piece to be added to the machinery of business, not understanding what lies at the core of this concept. So how can you go about changing your company’s culture? Here are four approaches that will lead to success: Culture is not something that you can dictate from above. We pick and choose the things that we buy into, that we commit to and become passionate about, and that applies as much to corporate culture as to popular culture. The most important step in changing an organization’s culture is therefore buy-in. If you want to create a culture where people are pushed to be their absolute best, then you need to get their permission, both through the way you communicate with existing employees and the way you recruit new ones. Pushing people hard when they have not committed to this can lead to anger, resentment, and bitterness within the organization. Positive engagement and finding ways to make everyone that ambitious can lead to a dynamic, ever improving business. You need to make your culture part of the recruiting process, something candidates are aware of and buy into. Look for employees who fit your culture, not just the skill set for a particular job, and help people distinguish between what is and isn’t appropriate behavior. But if you want to achieve real change, then you need to go beyond this and involve employees in defining the culture. If they are involved in this process from the start, if the results are something that they feel they have shaped, then they will treat that culture as theirs. Many attempts to shape a culture fall short because they fail to address the whole person. But just as a culture is defined by every person within it, it is defined by every aspect of their presence within it. The physical environment of your workspace both reflects and defines how you fit in with your work. A cluttered, messy environment does not support lean, streamlined work—that’s one of the reasons lean specialists make a big issue of clearing out clutter. But equally a minimalist office without personal effects will not support a cozy, informal culture. Look at how your environment relates to the culture that you want. This holistic approach should extend to employees as well. Publicizing your company health plan tells employees that you want to be seen as caring about their well-being. Creating a multi-dimensional well-being program that looks to employees’ development, financial security, and social and physical health shows them that you mean it and improves morale and engagement. If you want to change the way employees relate to your corporate culture then it’s not enough to stick a value statement on the wall. You need to consider the physical, social, and psychological impact of your workplace. Being consistent is as important as any of this. No matter what you’re aiming for, if you behave inconsistently then you will get an inconsistent culture, and one where employees see you as insincere. The California nonprofit game designer HopeLab is a great example of how to get this right. Many companies claim to want to be inquiring and creative, then stick their employees in an environment that is rigid, inflexible, and lacking in the playfulness that encourages real innovation. HopeLab built reflection and inquiry into everything they do. Meetings have to be built around questions. The office is filled with cards designed to lead employees to challenge their assumptions. All forms of learning are supported and encouraged, bringing a stream of new skills and approaches into the organization. Everything from agendas to development plans is consistent with a spirit of questioning and innovation, so that is the culture they have. Of course all of this should be reflected in the company’s stated values, which will then shape behavior. Prioritize in a way that meets your values. This gives employees permission to focus on work that is consistent with your culture, and it will lead to both behavior and outputs that match your values. It is not enough to try to spread a positive culture across a troubled and inconsistent framework. It is only by building that culture into the everyday working lives of your employees, into the very fabric of your business, both physical and intellectual, that you can build something with a real impact. Creating a positive culture is not an easy thing. But it is one that can energize and drive your business. It’s a fine model and one we should all learn from. —Mark Lukens is a Founding Partner of Method3, a global management consulting firm. He has 20 plus years of C-Level experience across multiple sectors including health care, education, government, and talent/human resources.


News Article | July 29, 2015
Site: www.businesswire.com

REDWOOD CITY, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--HopeLab, the pioneering health-focused R&D organization of The Omidyar Group, today announced Margaret Laws as its new president and chief executive officer. For more than 25 years, Laws has distinguished herself as a catalytic leader in health care, with a broad range of experience in public policy, philanthropy, business and impact investing. She joins HopeLab as Pat Christen, previous president and CEO, assumes a new position as a managing director of The Omidyar Group. “As the health care marketplace evolves, HopeLab has an important role to play in advancing our understanding of how technology can improve health and well-being, particularly for kids and young adults,” said Laws. “I’m excited to work with the HopeLab staff and board to further our philanthropic work in ground-breaking scientific research and product development.” Laws brings her passion for forging cross-sector partnerships that drive positive social impact to her role at HopeLab. Prior to joining HopeLab, she spent 17 years at the California HealthCare Foundation in a number of roles, including Director of Public Financing and Policy and Director of the Innovations for the Underserved program. She also founded the CHCF Health Innovation Fund, a mission-focused fund investing in health care technology and service companies that improve access to and lower costs of health care. “Having Margaret lead the HopeLab team is a great next step in the evolution of our organization,” said Pam Omidyar, founder and board chair of HopeLab. “I’m very proud of HopeLab’s work and its evidence-based approach to technology development. Margaret’s experience and passion for creating impactful partnerships will help us deliver on our mission in inspiring new ways.” At HopeLab Margaret leads a multidisciplinary team that combines behavioral science, user-centered design, rigorous research, and partnerships with innovators to create technologies that promote human resilience by motivating positive behavior change. HopeLab products include the Re-Mission® and Re-Mission 2® games for young cancer patients and Zamzee®, a wearable activity meter and motivational website designed to boost physical activity in kids and families, as well as a portfolio of projects in its Resilience Technology Initiative. HopeLab is the recipient of the 2014 Drucker Award for Nonprofit Innovation for its pioneering work in creating products that help people respond to life’s adversity in healthy ways. HopeLab also has been named a Social Enterprise of the Year by Fast Company magazine and was recognized by President Obama and the White House Office of Social Innovation and Civic Participation for innovating new approaches to improving the health of young people. Founded in 2001 by Pam Omidyar, HopeLab creates technology products to help people thrive. We focus on motivating positive health behavior in kids and young adults to support health and well-being. Our approach combines behavioral science, user-centered design, and strategic partnerships to drive broad impact. HopeLab is a 501(c)3 nonprofit operating foundation and serves as the health-focused R&D organization of The Omidyar Group, which represents the interests of Pam and Pierre Omidyar, the founder of eBay. Learn more at www.hopelab.org.


News Article | July 29, 2015
Site: www.businesswire.com

REDWOOD CITY, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--HopeLab, the pioneering health-focused R&D organization of The Omidyar Group, today announced Margaret Laws as its new president and chief executive officer. For more than 25 years, Laws has distinguished herself as a catalytic leader in health care, with a broad range of experience in public policy, philanthropy, business and impact investing. She joins HopeLab as Pat Christen, previous president and CEO, assumes a new position as a managing director of The Omidyar Group. “As the health care marketplace evolves, HopeLab has an important role to play in advancing our understanding of how technology can improve health and well-being, particularly for kids and young adults,” said Laws. “I’m excited to work with the HopeLab staff and board to further our philanthropic work in ground-breaking scientific research and product development.” Laws brings her passion for forging cross-sector partnerships that drive positive social impact to her role at HopeLab. Prior to joining HopeLab, she spent 17 years at the California HealthCare Foundation in a number of roles, including Director of Public Financing and Policy and Director of the Innovations for the Underserved program. She also founded the CHCF Health Innovation Fund, a mission-focused fund investing in health care technology and service companies that improve access to and lower costs of health care. “Having Margaret lead the HopeLab team is a great next step in the evolution of our organization,” said Pam Omidyar, founder and board chair of HopeLab. “I’m very proud of HopeLab’s work and its evidence-based approach to technology development. Margaret’s experience and passion for creating impactful partnerships will help us deliver on our mission in inspiring new ways.” At HopeLab Margaret leads a multidisciplinary team that combines behavioral science, user-centered design, rigorous research, and partnerships with innovators to create technologies that promote human resilience by motivating positive behavior change. HopeLab products include the Re-Mission® and Re-Mission 2® games for young cancer patients and Zamzee®, a wearable activity meter and motivational website designed to boost physical activity in kids and families, as well as a portfolio of projects in its Resilience Technology Initiative. HopeLab is the recipient of the 2014 Drucker Award for Nonprofit Innovation for its pioneering work in creating products that help people respond to life’s adversity in healthy ways. HopeLab also has been named a Social Enterprise of the Year by Fast Company magazine and was recognized by President Obama and the White House Office of Social Innovation and Civic Participation for innovating new approaches to improving the health of young people. Founded in 2001 by Pam Omidyar, HopeLab creates technology products to help people thrive. We focus on motivating positive health behavior in kids and young adults to support health and well-being. Our approach combines behavioral science, user-centered design, and strategic partnerships to drive broad impact. HopeLab is a 501(c)3 nonprofit operating foundation and serves as the health-focused R&D organization of The Omidyar Group, which represents the interests of Pam and Pierre Omidyar, the founder of eBay. Learn more at www.hopelab.org.

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