Frederick, MD, United States
Frederick, MD, United States

Hood College is a co-educational liberal arts college serving 2,422 students, 1,434 of whom are undergraduates. Located in Frederick, Maryland, the school lies 50 miles west of Baltimore and northwest of Washington, DC.Established in 1893 by the Potomac Synod of the Reformed Church of the United States as the Woman's College of Frederick, the school was officially chartered in 1897 "with the purpose and object of creating and maintaining a college for the promotion and advancement of women, and the cultivation and diffusion of Literature, Science and Art." The college's founding was the result of the Potomac Synod's decision to transition the coeducational Mercersburg College into the all-male Mercersburg Academy and establish a women's college south of the Mason–Dixon line. In 1913, the institution was renamed Hood College by its Board of Trustees to honor its largest benefactor, Margaret Scholl Hood, whose land donation allowed the school to move from rented facilities in downtown Frederick to its own campus in the northwest region of the City.An all-female institution until 1971, male students were initially granted only commuter status. This continued until 2003, when male students were extended the option of residential status. The influx of new students has led to major changes at the school, including extensive dormitory renovations and the construction of a new athletic building and a new tennis and aquatic center. Wikipedia.


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De Los Reyes A.,University of Maryland University College | Thomas S.A.,University of Maryland University College | Kundey S.M.A.,Hood College
Annual Review of Clinical Psychology | Year: 2013

Researchers use multiple informants' reports to assess and examine behavior. However, informants' reports commonly disagree. informants' reports often disagree in their perceived levels of a behavior ("low" versus "elevated" mood), and examining multiple reports in a single study often results in inconsistent findings. Although researchers often espouse taking a multi-informant assessment approach, they frequently address informant discrepancies using techniques that treat discrepancies as measurement error. Yet, recent work indicates that researchers in a variety of fields often may be unable to justify treating informant discrepancies as measurement error. In this review, the authors advance a framework (Operations Triad Model) outlining general principles for using and interpreting informants' reports. Using the framework, researchers can test whether or not they can extract meaningful information about behavior from discrepancies among multiple informants' reports. The authors provide supportive evidence for this framework and discuss its implications for hypothesis testing, study design, and quantitative review. Copyright © 2013 by Annual Reviews.


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Catalent Pharma Solutions, the leading global provider of advanced delivery technologies and development solutions for drugs, biologics and consumer health products, today announced that two leading analytical experts from Catalent Biologics will be presenting a workshop on the development and validation of bioassays, at the upcoming first BEBPA U.S. Bioassay Conference, to be held at the Sheraton Fisherman’s Wharf, San Francisco, on March 8 – 10, 2017. The workshop, starting at 9 a.m. on Wednesday, March 8, is entitled “The Course Awakens: Moving Bioassays from Development to Phase-Appropriate Validation,” and will be hosted by Mike Sadick, Ph.D., Principal Scientist, Biologics Analytical Services, Development; and Mike Merges, Director of Strategic Growth of Biologics Analytical Services. The day-long workshop will present a number of topics covering all aspects of phase-appropriate validations, from Investigational New Drug/Phase I through to Phase III/post-Biologic License Application, and will include both practical and theoretical approaches to development. Regulatory guidelines in the area, such as ICH Q2(R1) and USP 1033 will be addressed, compared, and contrasted as part of the session, which will be an interactive forum where advice, challenges and practical tips can be discussed openly. Dr. Sadick has an extensive background in cellular biology, cellular immunology, receptor signaling, molecular biology and biochemistry. He has more than thirty years of experience in research and industry, with prior positions at Genentech, Eli Lilly and Aptuit before joining Catalent in 2012. His current role sees him lead Catalent’s activities in potency assays, both cell-based and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based, as well as molecular biology (including cloning and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR)), and protein/protein binding assessment. He holds a bachelor’s in biology from John Hopkins University, and a master’s and doctorate, both in immunology, from the University of Washington. Mr. Merges joined Catalent in 2011 as Director of Catalent Biologics Analytical Services, focusing on the transfer, development, validation, and performance of bioassays, immunoassays, microbiological assays, and viral clearance assays. Prior to that, he was Associate Director of Bioservices for Lonza Biologics, and has also held positions at the University of Maryland’s Institute of Human Virology, the National Cancer Institute and Johns Hopkins University, where he conducted viral immunology research. He obtained his bachelor’s degree in microbiology from the Pennsylvania State University, and his master’s degree in microbiology/virology from Hood College. For more information on the conference, visit: http://www.bebpa.org/conferences/, and to arrange a meeting with any of the Catalent executives attending the event, contact Richard Kerns at NEPR - richard(at)nepr(dot)eu For more information on Catalent Biologics, visit http://www.catalentbiologics.com About Catalent Catalent is the leading global provider of advanced delivery technologies and development solutions for drugs, biologics and consumer health products. With over 80 years serving the industry, Catalent has proven expertise in bringing more customer products to market faster, enhancing product performance and ensuring reliable clinical and commercial product supply. Catalent employs approximately 10,000 people, including over 1,400 scientists, at more than 30 facilities across five continents, and in fiscal 2016 generated $1.85 billion in annual revenue. Catalent is headquartered in Somerset, New Jersey. For more information, visit http://www.catalent.com


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Catalent Pharma Solutions, the leading global provider of advanced delivery technologies and development solutions for drugs, biologics and consumer health products, today announced that Mr. Michael Merges, Director of Strategic Growth, Catalent Biologics Analytical Services, will be presenting at the upcoming WCBP Conference, to be held at the Mayflower Hotel, Washington DC, on Jan. 24 – 26, 2017. Mr. Merges’ presentation, on Tuesday, Jan. 24, at 1:30 p.m., is entitled “Benefits to Strategic Outsourcing,” and will discuss the underlying nature of growth in the biologics development market, which has led to bioassays being the most outsourced service by biomanufacturers, and the service expected to witness the highest future demand. The presentation will outline the principles, options and drivers for parties to create outsourcing partnerships, as well as demonstrating how such strategies can be effective through a case study. Mr. Merges joined Catalent in 2011 as Director of Catalent Biologics Analytical Services, focusing on the transfer, development, validation, and performance of bioassays, immunoassays, microbiological assays, and viral clearance assays. Prior to that, he was Associate Director of Bioservices for Lonza Biologics, and has also held positions at the University of Maryland’s Institute of Human Virology, the National Cancer Institute and Johns Hopkins University, where he conducted viral immunology research. He obtained his bachelor’s degree in microbiology from the Pennsylvania State University, and his master’s degree in microbiology/virology from Hood College. For more information on the Conference, visit: http://www.casss.org/page/WCBP1700 and to arrange a meeting with Mr. Merges at the event, contact Richard Kerns at NEPR - richard(at)nepr.eu. For more information on Catalent Biologics, visit http://www.catalentbiologics.com About Catalent Catalent is the leading global provider of advanced delivery technologies and development solutions for drugs, biologics and consumer health products. With over 80 years serving the industry, Catalent has proven expertise in bringing more customer products to market faster, enhancing product performance and ensuring reliable clinical and commercial product supply. Catalent employs approximately 9,500 people, including over 1,400 scientists, at more than 30 facilities across five continents, and in fiscal 2016 generated $1.85 billion in annual revenue. Catalent is headquartered in Somerset, New Jersey. For more information, visit http://www.catalent.com


News Article | March 3, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Two experts in Black politics will speak at Hood College next week to close out the College’s Black History Month events. Elmer Dixon, a founder of a Black Panther Party chapter, and Lester Spence, Ph.D., associate professor of political science and Africana studies at The Johns Hopkins University, will give their talks March 7 and 8, respectively. Dixon will give his talk, “The Legacy of the Black Panther Party,” on March 7 at 7 p.m. in the Whitaker Campus Center Commons. He will talk about his personal experiences as a founding member of the Seattle Chapter of the Black Panther Party, and he will explore the many ways the party’s programs and philosophy remain relevant today. In 1968, Dixon and his brother, Aaron, co-founded the Seattle Chapter of the Black Panther Party. Dixon served as the chapter’s field marshal and as the breakfast program coordinator. He maintained the chapter until 1976 and many of its programs well into the 1980s. Today, he works as a diversity consultant, providing training and consultation in the areas of multi-cultural communication, team building and conflict management. For more information on Dixon’s talk, contact Aaron Angello at angello(at)hood(dot)edu or 301-696-3211. Spence will give his talk, “Mo(u)rning in America,” on March 8 at 7 p.m. in the Marx Center followed by a book signing. He will grapple with the profound impact of the 2016 elections on American Democracy and the persistent entrenched racial inequality that existed before and continues after the election of Donald Trump. His research spans a variety of topics from American political institutions, urban politics, race, and Black political empowerment to the role of media, hip hop, and inequality in Black communities. His books, “Stare in the Darkness: The Limits of Hip Hop and Black Politics” and “Knocking the Hustle: Against the Neoliberal Turn in Black Politics” are described by critics as analytically profound. His talk is co-sponsored by the African American Studies program and the Department of Political Science and is supported by the Office of the Provost. For more information on Spence’s talk, contact Hoda Zaki at hzaki(at)hood(dot)edu or 301-696-3697.


« Gen 2 Audi A5 Sportback available as bivalent g-tron; Audi e-gas, natural gas or gasoline | Main | Volkswagen Group & Anhui Jianghuai Automobile (JAC) jointly to develop EVs in China; new JV focused on NEVs » The US Department of Agriculture has provided $16,893 to Advanced Biofuels USA, a Maryland-based 501(c)(3) non-profit educational organization, for a feasibility study of producing bio-jetfuel from energy beets grown on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. The study will look at the technical and economic aspects of a project being developed by the University of Maryland Eastern Shore (UMES), Purdue University, and Maryland small businesses. Also of importance to the economic feasibility of this project are co-products that can provide economic opportunities to rural communities on the Eastern Shore when jetfuel prices are low due to fluctuating petroleum markets. In addition, UMES will explore the uptake of Eastern Shore legacy phosphates by the energy beets. If this can be demonstrated, the beets-to-bio-jetfuel project could be a cost-effective approach to reducing Chesapeake Bay nutrient runoff from the long-term use of poultry litter as fertilizer. Also, UMES will be looking at using the proteins from the biomass as potential high value poultry feed or other animal feed. Unique Maryland-based innovations of the bio-jetfuel project include non-food, low nutrient input energy beets developed by Plant Sensory Systems, LLC of Baltimore and a proprietary enzyme conversion system that utilizes the entire biomass of the energy beet root, including biomass ignored during conventional sugar production. This process has been developed by Atlantic Biomass, LLC and Hood College, both located in Frederick, Maryland. The objective of the Advanced Biofuels USA study is to determine if the first-stage data produced from the UMES energy beet pilot crop and commercial simulation processing shows that the crop and supply-chain have enough yield and production advantages that investments should be made to overcome hurdles identified in the feasibility analysis in order to take the project to commercialization. In addition, the energy beet feasibility study will look at priorities identified in the White House’s National Science and Technology Council’s report Federal Alternative Jet Fuels Research and Development Strategy. The funding of this feasibility study by the Maryland/Delaware USDA Office of Rural Development is part of the action plan USDA, the Departments of Energy, Transportation, and the US Navy are following to develop sustainable bio-based jetfuel to replace fossil fuel without the need to modify aircraft engines and fuel distribution infrastructures. Priorities included for analysis by this study will include:


Sanders J.M.,Hood College
Journal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse | Year: 2011

This research aims to uncover aspects of adolescent masculine development among adult substance abusers. In-depth interviews and the resulting narrative provide the data for this exploratory analysis. Three main areas of adolescent masculinities are discussed: substance abuse, juvenile delinquency, and recreation. The findings are interpreted in light of Connell's conceptualization of hegemonic masculinities. Based on this sample, masculinities are constructed via a menu of adolescent behaviors that are descriptive of a working class lifestyle. It is the cultural context that sets the stage for substance abuse and its meaning to identity formation in adolescence, as well as in adulthood. Substance abuse in adolescence, along with other forms of juvenile delinquency and recreation, is a means of achieving masculinity. Unfortunately, for these men the use of substance abuse to achieve masculinity in adolescence becomes problematic later in adulthood. This article concludes that to successfully recover from substance abuse and addiction, these men must revisit and reframe their adolescent constructions of masculinity to better fit the problems and challenges they face as adults. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: IUSE | Award Amount: 330.98K | Year: 2015

Collaborators at Hood College, Frederick Community College, and Mount St. Marys College seek to develop inquiry based laboratory experiments while simultaneously providing a replicable model for increasing instrumentation access across multiple institutions. The implementation of these inquiry-based activities will place the responsibility for learning on the students, so that they engage with the material at a deeper level than in traditional ?confirmation? experiments. This will lead to greater internalization and integration of the material, which increases both student learning and confidence. The primary focus of this Improving Undergraduate Education project will be on integrating guided-inquiry experiences across the chemistry curriculum, however faculty in other disciplines including physics, geosciences, and art/archaeology will also be involved. Each activity will be developed by one institution, but as many as possible will be tested at multiple sites. Assessment will allow the activities to be vetted across different institution types (PUI versus community college) with varied student profiles, resulting in a library of experiments that can be shared with the chemical education community. The results of this work will be disseminated widely through posters, presentations, publications, and web-based resources.

There are varying levels of inquiry from low, level hands-on activities where the teacher determines the topics and questions to high level inquiry where the students determine all aspects of the experiment. Recognizing this, the collaborators plan to design experiments that use the highest level of inquiry possible, in which students choose the topic, methods, and finally share their interpretation of the results. In other words, students will be exposed to ways of learning and knowing that occur in scientific research. Data generated through assessment and evaluation should support the rationale that by cultivating students self-efficacy in the laboratory environment, they will have better content knowledge and greater assurance in their scientific abilities. Formative and summative evaluation will focus on whether or not the project objectives have been met and the effectiveness of project activities. Each experiment will be evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively (pre- and post-tests and selected exam questions. Because of the small class sizes at all three participating institutions, quantitative data is expected to be helpful for some of the larger courses like general and organic chemistry, but will be of limited utility for small courses. Therefore immediate student feedback mechanisms for each experiment will be developed. The results of this work will be widely disseminated, both on the individual activity and project level. Innovative experiments will be published in peer-reviewed journals such as the Journal of Chemical Education and The Chemical Educator. The results will also be presented at the American Chemical Society Biennial Conference on Chemical Education (2016). When appropriate, activities will also be uploaded to sub-discipline specific online communities such as the NSF-supported Virtual Inorganic Pedagogical Resource. Project deliverables will include results of summative evaluation and all course materials.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

An international organization dedicated to empowering women in science will launch a local chapter Jan. 23. Graduate Women in Science (GWIS) will launch the Greater Maryland chapter at 6 p.m. in the Whitaker Campus Center Commons at Hood College. The event will begin with an informal mixer followed by a lecture by Col. Andrea Stahl, deputy commander of United States Army Medical Research Institute for Infectious Diseases at Fort Detrick. Afterward, there will be a business meeting to discuss upcoming events for this new chapter. According to the GWIS website, the organization’s mission is to build a global community to inspire, support, recognize and empower women in science. The organization strives to build a powerful international network of women scientists, mentor the leaders of today so that they can inspire the leaders of tomorrow and empower women scientists to excel in their careers. There are 25 GWIS chapters across the country. The event is free and open to the public. For more information about GWIS, visit http://www.gwis.org. For more information about the launch event, contact April Boulton, co-founding member of the new chapter, at 301-696-3600 or boulton(at)hood(dot)edu.


News Article | April 1, 2016
Site: www.scientificamerican.com

Growing up I spent a lot of time in the attic for one simple reason — that’s where my parents hid the Game Boy. No matter. I had a well-laid plan: anytime everyone was out of the house, I'd pull down the ladder, scramble up its precarious stairs, and play Game Boy until I heard the garage door, giving me just enough time to scramble down, push up the ladder, and assume an innocent position. Not me; I wasn't playing Alleyway. As a fellow human, I hope you have your own version of this story. Well, so do dogs. In 2010, Shannon Kundey of Hood College led a study investigating when and how dogs sneak around. Here's how it went down — the study began with an inhibition task where the researcher put tasty treats on a plate and told the dog, "Nope! Not your food!” After that, the tasty treats were placed into two vastly different containers: a “noisy container” with a bell in it that rang whenever treats were put in or removed, and a “silent container” that lacked a bell and therefore treats could be acquired without making a peep. Now for the test: the researcher "sat guard" between the two containers in one of two positions. In the "looking" condition, the researcher looked at the dog, while in the "not looking" condition, the researcher didn't look at the dog and instead put her head between her knees. What's a dog to do? Apparently what you might do. Dogs preferred to take food from the silent container only in the condition where the experimenter was not looking at them. This means dogs preferred the silent container only when relevant to taking the treat undetected. When the experimenter was looking, and there was no way to avoid detection, dogs approached the noisy and silent containers relatively equally. Numerous studies find that dogs are highly attentive to people, and a subsequent study from Juliane Bräuer and colleagues at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology found that, although dogs take into account what humans can hear, dogs don't always take into account what humans can see. Bräuer and colleagues found that dogs didn’t conceal their approach to food when they couldn’t see a person but the person could see them. They suggest “it’s likely that dogs rely on what they themselves can perceive when they assess what the human can see and hear.” The next step for this line of work? Hopefully a reality TV show where teenagers and dogs face off in the ultimate challenge to reveal once and for all Who’s the Sneakiest? Bräuer et al. (2013). Domestic dogs conceal auditory but not visual information from others. Animal Cognition 16, 351-359. Kundey et al. (2010). Domesticated dogs (Canis familiaris) react to what others can and cannot hear. Applied Animal Behaviour Science 126, 45-50. Who’s Better At Sneaking Around... was adapted from a 2011 Dog Spies post.


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Ceramic arts collectors are loaning pieces of their personal collections to Hood College for an exhibit March 2-April 2 in the Whitaker Campus Center Gallery. The “Collectors’ Voices in Ceramic Art: A Leading Edge Exhibition” show will feature historical and contemporary ceramics from 19 major regional collectors, many affiliated with the James Renwick Alliance, a nonprofit that celebrates America’s craft artists. The pieces are from around the globe. Ceramic arts graduate students have been paired with a collector and have researched the collected ceramic artwork. Students then interviewed the collectors, researching the history of the work and the stories surrounding the acquisition of the pieces. During the exhibition, there will be two presentations, “History and Legacy: A Conversation with Collectors,” featuring the students and the collectors as they present their research on the works exhibited. These presentations will take place March 11 and March 25 from 3 to 5 p.m. in the Whitaker Campus Center Commons. The Whitaker Gallery is open daily from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. The opening reception is March 5 from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. in Whitaker Commons. The project is co-sponsored by the Hood College Humanities Council’s 2016-17 NEH colloquium series, “Narrative at the Edge of the World,” and the ceramic arts graduate program. All events are free and open to the public. For more information, contact Jenna Gianni at gianni(at)hood(dot)edu or 301-696-3285.

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