Frederick, MD, United States
Frederick, MD, United States

Hood College is a co-educational liberal arts college serving 2,422 students, 1,434 of whom are undergraduates. Located in Frederick, Maryland, the school lies 50 miles west of Baltimore and northwest of Washington, DC.Established in 1893 by the Potomac Synod of the Reformed Church of the United States as the Woman's College of Frederick, the school was officially chartered in 1897 "with the purpose and object of creating and maintaining a college for the promotion and advancement of women, and the cultivation and diffusion of Literature, Science and Art." The college's founding was the result of the Potomac Synod's decision to transition the coeducational Mercersburg College into the all-male Mercersburg Academy and establish a women's college south of the Mason–Dixon line. In 1913, the institution was renamed Hood College by its Board of Trustees to honor its largest benefactor, Margaret Scholl Hood, whose land donation allowed the school to move from rented facilities in downtown Frederick to its own campus in the northwest region of the City.An all-female institution until 1971, male students were initially granted only commuter status. This continued until 2003, when male students were extended the option of residential status. The influx of new students has led to major changes at the school, including extensive dormitory renovations and the construction of a new athletic building and a new tennis and aquatic center. Wikipedia.

SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

A noted economist will visit Hood College on April 5 to discuss the economic implications of the new administration’s policies. Anirban Basu, J.D., will give his talk, “Markets, He Wrote: Looking for Clues into the Economy’s Direction,” at 5:30 p.m. in Hodson Auditorium in Rosenstock Hall. His presentation will provide detailed discussions of global, national and regional economies using the most up-to-date data available. He will give special attention to critical elements of economic life, including the performance of financial, labor, and real estate markets. Basu is chairman and CEO of Sage Policy Group, Inc., an economic and policy consulting firm headquartered in Baltimore, Maryland, with offices in Pennsylvania and Indonesia. The firm provides strategic analytical services to energy suppliers, law firms, medical systems, government agencies and real estate developers among others. Basu is chair of the Maryland Economic Development Commission and the Baltimore County Economic Advisory Committee. He is also the chief economist to Associated Builders and Contractors and chief economic adviser to the Construction Financial Management Association. He lectures at Johns Hopkins University in global strategy. In both 2007 and 2016, the Daily Record newspaper selected him as one of Maryland’s 50 most influential people. The Baltimore Business Journal named him one of the region’s 20 most powerful business leaders in 2010. He earned his bachelor’s degree in foreign service at Georgetown University, a master’s in public policy from Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government, a master’s in economics from the University of Maryland, College Park, and a juris doctorate at the University Of Maryland School Of Law. Basu’s lecture is the latest installment of the La Fleur Management Lecture Series, sponsored by Bruce La Fleur, a Hood College MBA alumnus. This event is sponsored by the Hood Department of Economics and Business Administration. For more information, please contact Anita Jose at ajose(at)hood.edu or 301-696-3691.


News Article | June 15, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

In this photo provided by Ken Branson/MasterMIND Productions, Capitol Police Officer David Bailey in Cary, N.C., Aug. 6, 2016. Bailey was one of two wounded Capitol Police officers during the shooting of House Majority Whip Steve Scalise of La. during a Congressional baseball practice in Alexandria, Va., Wednesday, June 14, 2017. (Ken Branson/MasterMIND Productions via AP) RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — One of the U.S. Capitol Police officers injured while defending members of Congress during a shooting at a baseball field is a gregarious gym-goer and hard worker who adores his mother, his friends say. The other is a high-achieving former college athlete who a former boss says "exudes confidence and dedication." Special Agents David Bailey and Crystal Griner, along with their colleague Henry Cabrera, who was not injured, are being hailed as heroes for their response to the gunman who opened fire Wednesday during a congressional baseball team practice in Alexandria. The attack left three others, including U.S. Rep. Steve Scalise, injured, but authorities and lawmakers who were at the park say the officers' valor prevented what could have been a far worse tragedy. "They ran right into the fire. They ran right into those guns and the bullets, and they saved a lot of lives," President Donald Trump said of Griner and Bailey at a news conference Thursday. Bailey graduated from North Carolina Central University in Durham with a physical education degree in 2007, the university said in a statement. Casey Adams Jones met Bailey while he was a student there and said in an interview Thursday that they've become close friends in the 10 years since. "I'm just glad the public gets to see the hero I've always known," she said. Adams Jones said Bailey always had a passion for law enforcement and was proud to join the Capitol Police force about eight years ago. Bailey loves traveling, going to the gym and putting Heinz ketchup on everything, Adams Jones and fraternity brother Leonardo Williams said. Both also said he adored his mother, whom he helped care for after a recent surgery, according to Adams Jones. "He's going to always look out for people, protect people and do what he can do to make things easier for people. It was not out of the ordinary for him to do what he did yesterday, no way," said Priscilla Lewis of Durham, who said she's like a godmother to Bailey. Bailey was not shot but was treated for a minor injury and has been released from a hospital. Griner, who was shot in the ankle, was also released from a hospital where she and her wife were visited Wednesday night by the president and first lady Melania Trump, who brought them a bouquet of flowers, according to a White House pool report. Hood College in Frederick, Maryland, said Griner was a 2006 graduate. A biology major, Griner was a guard on the college basketball team and earned rookie of the year honors in 2003, according to a player profile provided by the school. "We are proud of Crystal Griner ... for her heroic actions and dedicated service. While I wasn't here when Crystal was a student, those who knew her describe her as highly engaged and personable, a high achiever both in the classroom and on the court," college President Andrea Chapdelaine said in a statement. Kim Dine, who retired last year as chief of the Capitol Police, said he remembered Griner as someone who "exudes confidence and dedication." "She always struck me as incredibly focused, diligent and professional and ready to meet the mission," he said, adding that the officers' response Wednesday was "brilliant and brave." Less was known about Cabrera or his role in the shooting. Neither he nor relatives could immediately be reached by The Associated Press. Rep. Roger Williams, a Texas Republican who witnessed the shooting and whose legislative aide was shot, said he and his family will be "forever grateful" that the officers prevented what could have easily been 25 deaths or more. "We saw two people risk their lives to save the lives of others," Williams said. "We saw courage in the face of death, and we saw examples of why all Americans should be grateful every day for law enforcement officers around this country." Associated Press writers Kasey Jones in Baltimore and Brian Witte in Annapolis, Maryland, contributed to this report.


De Los Reyes A.,University of Maryland University College | Thomas S.A.,University of Maryland University College | Kundey S.M.A.,Hood College
Annual Review of Clinical Psychology | Year: 2013

Researchers use multiple informants' reports to assess and examine behavior. However, informants' reports commonly disagree. informants' reports often disagree in their perceived levels of a behavior ("low" versus "elevated" mood), and examining multiple reports in a single study often results in inconsistent findings. Although researchers often espouse taking a multi-informant assessment approach, they frequently address informant discrepancies using techniques that treat discrepancies as measurement error. Yet, recent work indicates that researchers in a variety of fields often may be unable to justify treating informant discrepancies as measurement error. In this review, the authors advance a framework (Operations Triad Model) outlining general principles for using and interpreting informants' reports. Using the framework, researchers can test whether or not they can extract meaningful information about behavior from discrepancies among multiple informants' reports. The authors provide supportive evidence for this framework and discuss its implications for hypothesis testing, study design, and quantitative review. Copyright © 2013 by Annual Reviews.


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Catalent Pharma Solutions, the leading global provider of advanced delivery technologies and development solutions for drugs, biologics and consumer health products, today announced that two leading analytical experts from Catalent Biologics will be presenting a workshop on the development and validation of bioassays, at the upcoming first BEBPA U.S. Bioassay Conference, to be held at the Sheraton Fisherman’s Wharf, San Francisco, on March 8 – 10, 2017. The workshop, starting at 9 a.m. on Wednesday, March 8, is entitled “The Course Awakens: Moving Bioassays from Development to Phase-Appropriate Validation,” and will be hosted by Mike Sadick, Ph.D., Principal Scientist, Biologics Analytical Services, Development; and Mike Merges, Director of Strategic Growth of Biologics Analytical Services. The day-long workshop will present a number of topics covering all aspects of phase-appropriate validations, from Investigational New Drug/Phase I through to Phase III/post-Biologic License Application, and will include both practical and theoretical approaches to development. Regulatory guidelines in the area, such as ICH Q2(R1) and USP 1033 will be addressed, compared, and contrasted as part of the session, which will be an interactive forum where advice, challenges and practical tips can be discussed openly. Dr. Sadick has an extensive background in cellular biology, cellular immunology, receptor signaling, molecular biology and biochemistry. He has more than thirty years of experience in research and industry, with prior positions at Genentech, Eli Lilly and Aptuit before joining Catalent in 2012. His current role sees him lead Catalent’s activities in potency assays, both cell-based and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based, as well as molecular biology (including cloning and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR)), and protein/protein binding assessment. He holds a bachelor’s in biology from John Hopkins University, and a master’s and doctorate, both in immunology, from the University of Washington. Mr. Merges joined Catalent in 2011 as Director of Catalent Biologics Analytical Services, focusing on the transfer, development, validation, and performance of bioassays, immunoassays, microbiological assays, and viral clearance assays. Prior to that, he was Associate Director of Bioservices for Lonza Biologics, and has also held positions at the University of Maryland’s Institute of Human Virology, the National Cancer Institute and Johns Hopkins University, where he conducted viral immunology research. He obtained his bachelor’s degree in microbiology from the Pennsylvania State University, and his master’s degree in microbiology/virology from Hood College. For more information on the conference, visit: http://www.bebpa.org/conferences/, and to arrange a meeting with any of the Catalent executives attending the event, contact Richard Kerns at NEPR - richard(at)nepr(dot)eu For more information on Catalent Biologics, visit http://www.catalentbiologics.com About Catalent Catalent is the leading global provider of advanced delivery technologies and development solutions for drugs, biologics and consumer health products. With over 80 years serving the industry, Catalent has proven expertise in bringing more customer products to market faster, enhancing product performance and ensuring reliable clinical and commercial product supply. Catalent employs approximately 10,000 people, including over 1,400 scientists, at more than 30 facilities across five continents, and in fiscal 2016 generated $1.85 billion in annual revenue. Catalent is headquartered in Somerset, New Jersey. For more information, visit http://www.catalent.com


News Article | March 3, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Two experts in Black politics will speak at Hood College next week to close out the College’s Black History Month events. Elmer Dixon, a founder of a Black Panther Party chapter, and Lester Spence, Ph.D., associate professor of political science and Africana studies at The Johns Hopkins University, will give their talks March 7 and 8, respectively. Dixon will give his talk, “The Legacy of the Black Panther Party,” on March 7 at 7 p.m. in the Whitaker Campus Center Commons. He will talk about his personal experiences as a founding member of the Seattle Chapter of the Black Panther Party, and he will explore the many ways the party’s programs and philosophy remain relevant today. In 1968, Dixon and his brother, Aaron, co-founded the Seattle Chapter of the Black Panther Party. Dixon served as the chapter’s field marshal and as the breakfast program coordinator. He maintained the chapter until 1976 and many of its programs well into the 1980s. Today, he works as a diversity consultant, providing training and consultation in the areas of multi-cultural communication, team building and conflict management. For more information on Dixon’s talk, contact Aaron Angello at angello(at)hood(dot)edu or 301-696-3211. Spence will give his talk, “Mo(u)rning in America,” on March 8 at 7 p.m. in the Marx Center followed by a book signing. He will grapple with the profound impact of the 2016 elections on American Democracy and the persistent entrenched racial inequality that existed before and continues after the election of Donald Trump. His research spans a variety of topics from American political institutions, urban politics, race, and Black political empowerment to the role of media, hip hop, and inequality in Black communities. His books, “Stare in the Darkness: The Limits of Hip Hop and Black Politics” and “Knocking the Hustle: Against the Neoliberal Turn in Black Politics” are described by critics as analytically profound. His talk is co-sponsored by the African American Studies program and the Department of Political Science and is supported by the Office of the Provost. For more information on Spence’s talk, contact Hoda Zaki at hzaki(at)hood(dot)edu or 301-696-3697.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Catalent Pharma Solutions, the leading global provider of advanced delivery technologies and development solutions for drugs, biologics and consumer health products, today announced that Mr. Michael Merges, Director of Strategic Growth, Catalent Biologics Analytical Services, will be presenting at the upcoming WCBP Conference, to be held at the Mayflower Hotel, Washington DC, on Jan. 24 – 26, 2017. Mr. Merges’ presentation, on Tuesday, Jan. 24, at 1:30 p.m., is entitled “Benefits to Strategic Outsourcing,” and will discuss the underlying nature of growth in the biologics development market, which has led to bioassays being the most outsourced service by biomanufacturers, and the service expected to witness the highest future demand. The presentation will outline the principles, options and drivers for parties to create outsourcing partnerships, as well as demonstrating how such strategies can be effective through a case study. Mr. Merges joined Catalent in 2011 as Director of Catalent Biologics Analytical Services, focusing on the transfer, development, validation, and performance of bioassays, immunoassays, microbiological assays, and viral clearance assays. Prior to that, he was Associate Director of Bioservices for Lonza Biologics, and has also held positions at the University of Maryland’s Institute of Human Virology, the National Cancer Institute and Johns Hopkins University, where he conducted viral immunology research. He obtained his bachelor’s degree in microbiology from the Pennsylvania State University, and his master’s degree in microbiology/virology from Hood College. For more information on the Conference, visit: http://www.casss.org/page/WCBP1700 and to arrange a meeting with Mr. Merges at the event, contact Richard Kerns at NEPR - richard(at)nepr.eu. For more information on Catalent Biologics, visit http://www.catalentbiologics.com About Catalent Catalent is the leading global provider of advanced delivery technologies and development solutions for drugs, biologics and consumer health products. With over 80 years serving the industry, Catalent has proven expertise in bringing more customer products to market faster, enhancing product performance and ensuring reliable clinical and commercial product supply. Catalent employs approximately 9,500 people, including over 1,400 scientists, at more than 30 facilities across five continents, and in fiscal 2016 generated $1.85 billion in annual revenue. Catalent is headquartered in Somerset, New Jersey. For more information, visit http://www.catalent.com


Sanders J.M.,Hood College
Journal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse | Year: 2011

This research aims to uncover aspects of adolescent masculine development among adult substance abusers. In-depth interviews and the resulting narrative provide the data for this exploratory analysis. Three main areas of adolescent masculinities are discussed: substance abuse, juvenile delinquency, and recreation. The findings are interpreted in light of Connell's conceptualization of hegemonic masculinities. Based on this sample, masculinities are constructed via a menu of adolescent behaviors that are descriptive of a working class lifestyle. It is the cultural context that sets the stage for substance abuse and its meaning to identity formation in adolescence, as well as in adulthood. Substance abuse in adolescence, along with other forms of juvenile delinquency and recreation, is a means of achieving masculinity. Unfortunately, for these men the use of substance abuse to achieve masculinity in adolescence becomes problematic later in adulthood. This article concludes that to successfully recover from substance abuse and addiction, these men must revisit and reframe their adolescent constructions of masculinity to better fit the problems and challenges they face as adults. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: IUSE | Award Amount: 330.98K | Year: 2015

Collaborators at Hood College, Frederick Community College, and Mount St. Marys College seek to develop inquiry based laboratory experiments while simultaneously providing a replicable model for increasing instrumentation access across multiple institutions. The implementation of these inquiry-based activities will place the responsibility for learning on the students, so that they engage with the material at a deeper level than in traditional ?confirmation? experiments. This will lead to greater internalization and integration of the material, which increases both student learning and confidence. The primary focus of this Improving Undergraduate Education project will be on integrating guided-inquiry experiences across the chemistry curriculum, however faculty in other disciplines including physics, geosciences, and art/archaeology will also be involved. Each activity will be developed by one institution, but as many as possible will be tested at multiple sites. Assessment will allow the activities to be vetted across different institution types (PUI versus community college) with varied student profiles, resulting in a library of experiments that can be shared with the chemical education community. The results of this work will be disseminated widely through posters, presentations, publications, and web-based resources.

There are varying levels of inquiry from low, level hands-on activities where the teacher determines the topics and questions to high level inquiry where the students determine all aspects of the experiment. Recognizing this, the collaborators plan to design experiments that use the highest level of inquiry possible, in which students choose the topic, methods, and finally share their interpretation of the results. In other words, students will be exposed to ways of learning and knowing that occur in scientific research. Data generated through assessment and evaluation should support the rationale that by cultivating students self-efficacy in the laboratory environment, they will have better content knowledge and greater assurance in their scientific abilities. Formative and summative evaluation will focus on whether or not the project objectives have been met and the effectiveness of project activities. Each experiment will be evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively (pre- and post-tests and selected exam questions. Because of the small class sizes at all three participating institutions, quantitative data is expected to be helpful for some of the larger courses like general and organic chemistry, but will be of limited utility for small courses. Therefore immediate student feedback mechanisms for each experiment will be developed. The results of this work will be widely disseminated, both on the individual activity and project level. Innovative experiments will be published in peer-reviewed journals such as the Journal of Chemical Education and The Chemical Educator. The results will also be presented at the American Chemical Society Biennial Conference on Chemical Education (2016). When appropriate, activities will also be uploaded to sub-discipline specific online communities such as the NSF-supported Virtual Inorganic Pedagogical Resource. Project deliverables will include results of summative evaluation and all course materials.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

An international organization dedicated to empowering women in science will launch a local chapter Jan. 23. Graduate Women in Science (GWIS) will launch the Greater Maryland chapter at 6 p.m. in the Whitaker Campus Center Commons at Hood College. The event will begin with an informal mixer followed by a lecture by Col. Andrea Stahl, deputy commander of United States Army Medical Research Institute for Infectious Diseases at Fort Detrick. Afterward, there will be a business meeting to discuss upcoming events for this new chapter. According to the GWIS website, the organization’s mission is to build a global community to inspire, support, recognize and empower women in science. The organization strives to build a powerful international network of women scientists, mentor the leaders of today so that they can inspire the leaders of tomorrow and empower women scientists to excel in their careers. There are 25 GWIS chapters across the country. The event is free and open to the public. For more information about GWIS, visit http://www.gwis.org. For more information about the launch event, contact April Boulton, co-founding member of the new chapter, at 301-696-3600 or boulton(at)hood(dot)edu.


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Ceramic arts collectors are loaning pieces of their personal collections to Hood College for an exhibit March 2-April 2 in the Whitaker Campus Center Gallery. The “Collectors’ Voices in Ceramic Art: A Leading Edge Exhibition” show will feature historical and contemporary ceramics from 19 major regional collectors, many affiliated with the James Renwick Alliance, a nonprofit that celebrates America’s craft artists. The pieces are from around the globe. Ceramic arts graduate students have been paired with a collector and have researched the collected ceramic artwork. Students then interviewed the collectors, researching the history of the work and the stories surrounding the acquisition of the pieces. During the exhibition, there will be two presentations, “History and Legacy: A Conversation with Collectors,” featuring the students and the collectors as they present their research on the works exhibited. These presentations will take place March 11 and March 25 from 3 to 5 p.m. in the Whitaker Campus Center Commons. The Whitaker Gallery is open daily from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. The opening reception is March 5 from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. in Whitaker Commons. The project is co-sponsored by the Hood College Humanities Council’s 2016-17 NEH colloquium series, “Narrative at the Edge of the World,” and the ceramic arts graduate program. All events are free and open to the public. For more information, contact Jenna Gianni at gianni(at)hood(dot)edu or 301-696-3285.

Loading Hood College collaborators
Loading Hood College collaborators