Hong Kong Polytechnic University

www.polyu.edu.hk
Hong Kong, China

The Hong Kong Polytechnic University is a public university located in Hung Hom, Hong Kong. The history of PolyU can be traced back to 1937, and it assumed full university status in 1994. It is one of the funded institutions of the territory's University Grants Committee .PolyU has an international faculty and student community and has developed a global network with more than 440 institutions in 47 countries and regions. PolyU offers 220 postgraduate, undergraduate and sub-degree programmes for more than 32,000 students every year. It is the largest UGC-funded tertiary institution in terms of number of students. Wikipedia.

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Patent
Hong Kong Polytechnic University | Date: 2017-02-06

The present invention relates to novel series of amine-containing flavonoids and compositions containing the compounds, as well as the synthesis and the use of the same. The invention also relates to methods of treatment and prevention of diseases, in particular, parasitic infections including Leishmaniasis, comprising administration of the compounds.


Patent
Hong Kong Polytechnic University and McGill University | Date: 2016-10-18

A triazole bridged flavonoid dimer compound library was efficiently constructed via the cycloaddition reaction of a series of flavonoid-containing azides (Az 1-15) and alkynes (Ac 1-17). These triazole bridged flavonoid dimers and their precursor alkyne- and azide-containing flavonoids were screened for their ability to modulate multidrug resistance (MDR) in P-gp-overexpressed cell line (LCC6MDR), MRP1-overexpressed cell line (2008/MRP1) and BCRP-overexpressed cell line (HEK293/R2 and MCF7-MX100). Generally, they displayed very promising MDR reversal activity against P-gp-, MRP1- and BCRP-mediated drug resistance. Moreover, they showed different levels of selectivity for various transporters. Overall, they can be divided into mono-selective, dual-selective and multi-selective modulators for the P-gp, MRP1 and BCRP transporters. The EC_(50 )values for reversing paclitaxel resistance (141-340 nM) of LCC6MDR cells, DOX (78-590 nM) and vincristine (82-550 nM) resistance of 2008/MRP1 cells and topotecan resistance (0.9-135 nM) of HEK293/R2 and MCF7-MX100 cells were at nanomolar range. Importantly, a number of compounds displayed EC_(50 )at or below 10 nM in BCRP-overexpressed cell lines, indicating that these bivalent triazoles more selectively inhibit BCRP transporter than the P-gp and MRP1 transporters. Most of the dimers are notably safe MDR chemosensitizers as indicated by their high therapeutic index values.


Patent
Hong Kong Polytechnic University | Date: 2017-08-16

A voltage balancing circuit is applied to a power supply system. The power supply system comprises N power storage devices. The voltage balancing circuit comprises: N switches, N capacitors and a controller; the N switches are respectively connected to the N serial power storage devices; the N switches are respectively connected to the first terminals of the N capacitors; the second terminals of the N capacitors are connected to a common neutral line; the controller is connected to the N switches through a control line to control the switching of the N switches. The voltage balancing circuit avoids power loss when balancing the voltage of a plurality of serial power storage devices, and is small in size and low-cost, and balances voltage quickly.


This invention is in the preparation of bulk nanostructured pure titanium at cryogenic temperatures using equal channel angular pressing and rolling, allowing the whole microstructures of pure titanium to be refined into the one that the mean grain size is smaller than 100 nm.


Patent
Hoya Lens Thailand Ltd. and Hong Kong Polytechnic University | Date: 2015-11-06

A spectacle lens can inhibit ametropia of the eyes and ensure full visibility. The spectacle lens comprises: first refraction areas and second refraction areas. Each first refraction area has a first refraction force that may be based on a prescription for correcting the ametropia of the eyes. Each second refraction area has a refraction force different from the first refraction force and may function to focus images on the positions except the retina of the eyes, to inhibit the development of the ametropia. Near the central part of the lens, the second refraction areas form a plurality of independent island-shaped areas, and the first refraction areas form the areas beyond the areas of the second refraction areas.


PolyU's novel bio-inspired anti-vibration structures has won the 2017 TechConnect Global Innovation Award. PolyU is the first tertiary institution in Hong Kong receiving this award, with 3 innovation projects snatching the honor. Credit: The Hong Kong Polytechnic University The Department of Mechanical Engineering of The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) has developed a novel bio-inspired nonlinear anti-vibration system that can significantly reduce vibration in mechanical systems. The system is better than existing devices in cost-efficiency and performance reliability, and has many applications. Inspired by the motion vibration control of the limb structures of birds and insects, the novel X-shaped system demonstrates nearly zero response to any vibration (quasi-zero low dynamic stiffness), but simultaneously exhibits high loading capacity. It also features automatic high damping for strong vibrations, and low damping for small vibrations, thus preventing high damping's adverse effect on a system's normal functioning during small vibration. These advantages stem from the novel system's nonlinearity—a unique feature lacking in most vibration control systems today, which are usually following linear system design. The novel system can therefore be applied very widely in engineering practices and vibration control devices. As a first step in transferring the innovation into daily life benefit, the research team led by Dr Xingjian Jing, associate professor of the department, has obtained funding, facilities and trial support from the construction sector to develop an assistive anti-vibration exoskeleton for hand-held jackhammers. With superb anti-vibration performance, the new device can prevent hand-arm occupation diseases among construction workers. Using the new device, the vibration of hands and arms in drilling concrete ground can be significantly suppressed to the ideal safety level, compared with many commonly-used jackhammers on the market. The very low cost for manufacturing and maintenance, and its great design flexibility for adapting to devices of different sizes and materials, can also enhance its potential applications. At present, the market price of a common passive control jackhammer is around HK$1,000. It is estimated that PolyU's assistive anti-vibration exoskeleton added to such passive control system will need only an additional HK$1,000 to $2,000, offering performance far exceeding high-quality active control devices that cost about HK$,10,000 to 40,000. Explore further: E-gloves to protect workers from dangerous vibration levels


News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Department of Mechanical Engineering of The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) has developed a novel bio-inspired nonlinear anti-vibration system that can significantly reduce vibration in various mechanic systems. The innovation far excels existing devices in cost-efficiency and performance reliability, and can have very wide applications. Inspired by the limb structures of birds and insects in motion vibration control, the novel X-shaped system is of capability to demonstrate nearly “zero response” to any vibration (quasi-zero low dynamic stiffness), but simultaneously of high loading capacity. It also features automatic high damping for strong vibration, and low damping for small vibration (thus preventing high damping’s adverse effect on a system’s normal functioning during small vibration). These advantages stem from the novel system’s nonlinearity – a unique feature lacking in most vibration control systems nowadays which are usually following linear system design. The novel system can therefore be applied very widely in various engineering practices and vibration control devices. As a first step in transferring the innovation into daily life benefit, the research team led by Dr Xingjian Jing, Associate Professor of the department, has obtained funding, and facilities and trial support from the construction sector, to embark on research in applying the patented novel system to build an assistive anti-vibration exoskeleton for hand-held jackhammers. With superb anti-vibration performance, the new device can markedly help prevent hand-arm occupation diseases among construction workers. Using the new device, the vibration at hand/arm in drilling concrete ground can be significantly suppressed to the ideal safety level, compared with many commonly-used jackhammers in the market. The very low cost in manufacturing and maintenance, with great design flexibility for adapting to devices of different sizes and materials, can also enhance its potential popular use. At present, the market price of a common passive control jackhammer is around HK$1,000. It is estimated that PolyU’s assistive anti-vibration exoskeleton added to such passive control system will need only an additional HK$1,000 - 2,000, yet with performance far excelling even good-quality active control device that cost about HK$,10,000 - 40,000. Dr Jing’s innovative bio-inspired system is one of the three PolyU innovations having won the TechConnect Global Innovation Awards 2017. It is the first time for a Hong Kong higher education institution to receive the awards, along with other global-renowned research institutes (including US NASA, National Labs, Georgia Tech, Princeton Lab, UCLA, Australia National U etc), at the TechConnect World Innovation Conference and Expo, the largest multi-sector summit for supporting the development and commercialization of innovations. The annual event held in the US gathers more than 4,000 technology innovators, ventures, industrial partners and investors from over 70 countries. Only the top 20% of innovations submitted to TechConnect World will receive awards, with assessment based on the potential positive impact the submitted technology will have on a specific industry sector. PolyU is the only awardee from Hong Kong, and snatches 3 out of the 26 global awards presented to non-US-federal-funded innovations across the world. Another 60 national awards are granted to innovations with US federal funding. The PolyU delegation will present their innovations and receive the awards in mid-May at TechConnect World conference and expo held in Washington DC. For details of the award, please visit its official website: http://www.techconnectworld.com/World2017/participate/innovation/awards.html Vibration can be controlled by passive systems, which isolate or mitigate vibration by passive techniques (e.g. rubber pads, mechanical springs, shock absorbers, base isolation), or via active systems, which apply force or energy in an equal and opposite fashion to the vibration force. In general, passive vibration control is most preferred in engineering practices, as its manufacturing, operating and maintenance cost is much lower than active system. It also consumes less energy, and is easier to repair, less complex and thus more reliable. However, the vibration control performance of active systems is much better. The PolyU novel bio-inspired X-shaped structure possesses all the benefits of the passive and active systems. It has superior nonlinear stiffness and damping characteristics which can suppress vibration transmission and/or absorb vibration energy dramatically in a beneficial nonlinear manner. The system thus has great potential in wide applications, other than applying in vibrating tools, such as jackhammers which is already undergoing research study by Dr Jing’s team. Amidst the many spectra the novel system can be applied include robotics, railways, vehicle suspension, precise machines, offshore platforms, marine engineering, aeronautic engineering, and various civil structures like bridges, buildings, etc.


Lam P.L.,Hong Kong Polytechnic University | Gambari R.,University of Ferrara
Journal of Controlled Release | Year: 2014

This review provides an overall discussion of microencapsulation systems for both oral and transdermal drug deliveries. Clinically, many drugs, especially proteins and peptides, are susceptible to the gastrointestinal tract and the first-pass metabolism after oral administration while some drugs exhibit low skin permeability through transdermal delivery route. Medicated microcapsules as oral and transdermal drug delivery vehicles are believed to offer an extended drug effect at a relatively low dose and provide a better patient compliance. The polymeric microcapsules can be produced by different microencapsulation methods and the drug microencapsulation technology provides the quality preservation for drug stabilization. The release of the entrapped drug is controlled and prolonged for specific usages. Some recent studies have focused on the evaluation of drug containing microcapsules on potential biological and therapeutic applications. For the oral delivery, in vivo animal models were used for evaluating possible treatment effects of drug containing microcapsules. For the transdermal drug delivery, skin delivery models were introduced to investigate the potential skin delivery of medicated microcapsules. Finally, the challenges and limitations of drug microencapsulation in real life are discussed and the commercially available drug formulations using microencapsulation technology for oral and transdermal applications are shown. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.


Lin P.,Hong Kong Polytechnic University | Yan F.,Hong Kong Polytechnic University
Advanced Materials | Year: 2012

Organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) show promising applications in various chemical and biological sensors. The advantages of OTFT-based sensors include high sensitivity, low cost, easy fabrication, flexibility and biocompatibility. In this paper, we review the chemical sensors and biosensors based on two types of OTFTs, including organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) and organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs), mainly focusing on the papers published in the past 10 years. Various types of OTFT-based sensors, including pH, ion, glucose, DNA, enzyme, antibody-antigen, cell-based sensors, dopamine sensor, etc., are classified and described in the paper in sequence. The sensing mechanisms and the detection limits of the devices are described in details. It is expected that OTFTs may have more important applications in chemical and biological sensing with the development of organic electronics. Organic thin-film transistors, including organic field-effect transistors and organic electrochemical transistors, can be used in various types of chemical and biological sensors, such as pH, humidity, ion, glucose, DNA, enzyme, antibody-antigen, cell and dopamine sensors. The organic transistors are expected to have more important sensing applications with the development of organic electronics. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.


Huang K.,Hong Kong Polytechnic University
IEEE Transactions on Information Theory | Year: 2013

Designing mobiles to harvest ambient energy such as kinetic activities or electromagnetic radiation will enable wireless networks to be self-sustaining. In this paper, the spatial throughput of a mobile ad hoc network powered by energy harvesting is analyzed using a stochastic-geometry model. In this model, transmitters are distributed as a Poisson point process and energy arrives at each transmitter randomly with a uniform average rate called the energy arrival rate. Upon harvesting sufficient energy, each transmitter transmits with fixed power to an intended receiver under an outage-probability constraint for a target signal-to-interference-and-noise ratio. It is assumed that transmitters store energy in batteries with infinite capacity. By applying the random-walk theory, the probability that a transmitter transmits, called the transmission probability, is proved to be equal to the smaller of one and the ratio between the energy-arrival rate and transmission power. This result and tools from stochastic geometry are applied to maximize the network throughput for a given energy-arrival rate by optimizing transmission power. The maximum network throughput is shown to be proportional to the optimal transmission probability, which is equal to one if the transmitter density is below a derived function of the energy-arrival rate or otherwise is smaller than one and solves a given polynomial equation. Last, the limits of the maximum network throughput are obtained for the extreme cases of high energy-arrival rates and sparse/dense networks. © 1963-2012 IEEE.

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