Oakland, CA, United States
Oakland, CA, United States

Holy Names University is a private, coeducational university located in Oakland, California. It is affiliated with the Roman Catholic Church and is administered by the Sisters of the Holy Names of Jesus and Mary. Wikipedia.


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Goodwin M.,Holy Names University | Goodwin M.,Center for Nursing Excellence | Jenkins-Weinrub E.,Holy Names University
Nurse Educator | Year: 2015

This article presents an approach for a collaborative practicum experience for master's degree nursing students. The students were placed into triads and then assigned as a group to work in a large health care organization. A triad consisted of 1 student from each concentration of study: nursing administration, nursing education, or nursing informatics, and the group was immersed in real-time problem-solving and decision-making processes over the course of the year. © 2015 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Head Not The Tail Productions (HNTT Productions) is delighted to announce that its powerful and inspiring documentary "Invisible Women: Being a Black Woman in Corporate America" has been accepted for screening at the 2017 Hollywood Black Film Festival (HBFF). The influential film, skillfully directed by Melody Shere'a and executive produced by her talented sibling Monica Simmons, is the result of a year-long research study interviewing professional black women in the San Francisco Bay Area and New York City. "Invisible Women" uncovers and addresses issues around racism that profoundly affects black women in the corporate workplace. In the film, several women share respective experiences of disappointment and rejection when simply trying to earn a living and compete against women of other races for a higher step on the corporate ladder. The film will screen at the Hollywood Black Film Festival on Thursday, February 23rd at 2:15 p.m., hosted at the AMC Theater Marketplace 6 in Marina del Rey, CA. View a message from the creators of Invisible Women "For the production of "Invisible Women: Being a Black Woman in Corporate America," we interviewed black women of varied professional levels who generously shared their previously untold stories and feelings around race-related issues on the job," said Shere'a, HNTT Productions founder and CEO. "In conducting the research, we found the corporate practice of discrimination to be a common harsh reality faced by countless women of color. We also interviewed experts who provide employment reports and statistical data on this topic." Continuing support of the #equality4blackwomen movement, Invisible Women director and executive producer, Shere'a and Simmons, will attend the 48th NAACP Image Awards to be held February 11th in Pasadena, CA. Shere'a said, "I am most excited to see the outstanding cast of "Hidden Figures" (Taraji P Henson, Octavia Spencer, and Janell Monae), who will also be presenters at the awards show." Based on a true story, the "Hidden Figures" film depicts a group of black female mathematicians who in 1961, helped NASA win the Space Race while facing extreme discrimination in the segregated NASA workplace. According to Simmons, "Black women continue to experience racism on the job. We must be open to talking about this distressing issue to move toward a resolution. Obstacles that my sister and I have faced working in Corporate America were the inspiration behind "Invisible Women: Being a Black Woman in Corporate America." Our film is meant to drive a movement for change in the workplace, especially the technology industry. " "No longer should we be silenced. We need to speak up and call it what it is," commented Shere'a. Unlike "Hidden Figures," we are no longer in the 1950's-60's era. This racial discrimination against smart, educated, and powerful black women is unacceptable. We deserve a seat at the table, and we are demanding our place to exist, no longer will we continue to remain "Invisible Women." ABOUT THE HOLLYWOOD BLACK FILM FESTIVAL: Founded in 1998 by Tanya Kersey, the Hollywood Black Film Festival (HBFF) aims to enhance the careers of emerging and established Black filmmakers through a public exhibition, competition program and industry panels. Known amongst the entertainment industry’s powerbrokers as, “The Black Sundance,” the festival brings independent works of accomplished and aspiring black filmmakers to an environment encompassing the mainstream Hollywood community and Southern California film-going audiences. The festival’s goal is to play an integral role in discovering and launching independent films and filmmakers by bringing them to the attention of the industry, press, and public. The Hollywood Black Film Festival is an annual four-day celebration of Black Cinema drawing together established filmmakers, popular film and TV stars, writers, directors, industry executives, emerging artists, and diverse audiences from Hollywood and around the world. The 14th edition of the Hollywood Black Film Festival will take place February 22-26, 2017 in Marina del Rey, CA. ABOUT HEAD NOT THE TAIL PRODUCTIONS (HNTTP): HNTT Productions, founded in 2016 by Melody Shere’a, is located in the heart of Oakland, California. The company creates, develops, produces and invests in film, television and documentary projects. The entertainment industry veteran possesses more than ten years acting, print modeling, and voice-over experience. She is a member of the Screen Actors Guild (SAG). Shere’a graduated from Cal State Hayward, where she earned her Bachelor’s degree, and later pursued an MBA in Finance at Holy Names University in Oakland. Monica Simmons is the Executive Producer of the documentary and head of production and film development for HNTT Productions. Shere'a, HNTT Productions CEO states, "For too long our stories have been left behind. It is HNTT Productions' goal is to bring forth the change needed in the entertainment industry by becoming the 'Head and Not The Tail' in this business".    HNTTProductions.com


News Article | November 3, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

In April this year, Black Entertainment Television (BET) aired the tenth annual Black Girls Rock! celebration and award show dedicated to elevating the narratives of Black women and shining a light on the achievements of women of color whose contributions often go under the radar in mainstream media. Between high-energy musical performances and award presentations, presidential candidate Secretary Hillary Clinton heralded the Black Girls Rock! Movement and its founder Beverly Bond. In her speech, Clinton referred to black women as "change makers and path breakers and ground-shakers." She went on to share her thoughts about barriers black women face in this country. This film "is to rebuke every single one of those barriers and discrimination and systemic racism that keep them up," Clinton said. Clinton's comments were strictly in line with the profound message delivered in the Head Not The Tail Productions' (HNTT Productions) documentary titled "Invisible Women: Being a Black Woman in Corporate America." The film, directed by Melody Shere'a and executive produced by her sister Monica Simmons, is a powerful and inspiring documentary that uncovers and addresses issues around racism that profoundly affect black women in the corporate workplace. Highly educated and qualified women featured in the film share respective experiences of disappointment and rejection when simply trying to earn a living and compete against (mostly white) women for a higher step on the corporate ladder. Shere'a and Simmons are talented sisters, who have each personally experienced workplace race and gender discrimination throughout their corporate careers, which is how they conceived the idea to develop this documentary and start the conversation. "In conducting research for the film," said Shere'a. "We found the corporate practice of discrimination to be a common harsh reality faced by countless women of color." Clinton speaks about opportunities that she as the president wants to make available for women. Shere'a wants to be sure that "black women share in those opportunities." "Invisible Women" to go on National Tour: Invisible Women's premiere screening was held October 12, 2016, on the campus of Holy Names University in Oakland, CA. Overwhelmingly received, the film is set to re-screen at the same venue November 11th. "Invisible Women" will commence its national tour in late January, headed for Washington, D.C., New York, Atlanta, Orlando, and Los Angeles. Screening dates will be announced. Though numerous entities address the issue by hiring and promoting more women into management positions and corporate executive roles, a considerable recognition/advancement gap still exists for black women. The playing field isn’t level, and well-qualified black women are too frequently denied the opportunity to explore similar career growth opportunities as their white and other female counterparts. The facts and details you will learn from this documentary will surprise you. ABOUT HEAD NOT THE TAIL PRODUCTIONS (HNTTP): HNTT Productions, founded in 2016 by Melody Shere’a, is located in the heart of Oakland, California. The company creates, develops, produces and invests in film, television and documentary projects. The entertainment industry veteran possesses more than ten years acting, print modeling and voice-over experience. She is a member of the Screen Actors Guild (SAG). Shere’a graduated from Cal State Hayward, where she earned her Bachelor’s degree, and later pursued an MBA in Finance at Holy Names University in Oakland. Monica Simmons is the Executive Producer of the documentary and head of production and film development for HNTT Productions. HNTTProductions.com


News Article | October 29, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Head Not The Tail Productions (HNTT Productions) is excited to announce the forthcoming screening of its important and timely documentary titled Invisible Women: Being a Black Woman in Corporate America. The film, directed by Melody Shere'a and executive produced by Monica Simmons, is a powerful and inspiring documentary that is the result of a year-long research study interviewing black professional women in the San Francisco Bay Area and New York City. Invisible Women uncovers and addresses issues around racism that profoundly affect black women in the corporate workplace. The women share respective experiences of disappointment and rejection when simply trying to earn a living and/or compete against white, Asian and women of other races for a higher step on the corporate ladder. Invisible Women will screen Wednesday, October 12, 2016 from 6 to 9 p.m. at Valley Center for the Performing Arts, a unique performance facility that exists in the Oakland Hills on the scenic campus of Holy Names University (3500 Mountain Blvd., Oakland, CA). The evening will encompass the film viewing, reception and panel discussion. Tickets are $20 through Oct. 2; $30 thereafter. "For the production of Invisible Women, we interviewed black women of varied professional levels who generously shared their previously untold stories and feelings around race-related issues on the job," said Shere'a, HNTT Productions founder and CEO. "In conducting the research, we found the corporate practice of discrimination to be a common harsh reality faced by countless women of color. We also interviewed experts who provide employment reports and statistical data on this topic." Shere'a, the film's director and executive producer Simmons are talented sisters. They have each personally experienced workplace race and gender discrimination throughout their corporate careers, which is how they conceived the idea to develop this documentary. HNTT Productions partnered with non-profit organizations BlackFemaleProject.Org and Center for Talent Innovation to dig into the issues, look at the facts, explore the reality of working in corporate America as a black woman and delve into ways to improve the environment for tomorrow's young black corporate professionals. While there is certainly lobbying at local, state and federal levels for gender equality and diversity in the workplace, women's discrimination remains a troubling issue that as yet has not been adequately addressed. Though numerous entities address the issue by hiring and promoting more women into management positions and corporate executive roles, a considerable recognition/advancement gap still exists for black women. The playing field isn’t level and well-qualified black women are too frequently denied the opportunity to explore similar career growth opportunities as their white and other female counterparts. The facts and details you will learn from this documentary will surprise you. About News noted in a May 2016 report that although black women only make up 12.7 percent of the female population in the country, they consistently make up over 50 percent—and sometimes much more—of the number of blacks who receive postsecondary degrees. Percentage-wise, Black women outpace white women, Latinas, Asian/Pacific Islanders and Native Americans in the education arena. However, a recent study found black women make up just 8% of private sector jobs and 1.5% of leadership roles. Shere'a has a passion for empowering and mentoring young girls, and is a "Woman of Impact" member for Girls Inc. Alameda County. A portion of the event proceeds will be donated to the following organizations: Black Female Project, Girls Inc Alameda County, Girls Who Code and Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. To contribute directly to the fund, visit IndieGoGo crowdfunding page. ABOUT HEAD NOT THE TAIL PRODUCTIONS (HNTTP): HNTT Productions, founded in 2016 by Melody Shere’a, is located in the heart of Oakland, California. The company creates, develops, produces and invests in film, television and documentary projects. The entertainment industry veteran possesses more than 10 years acting, print modeling and voice-over experience. She is a member of the Screen Actors Guild (SAG). Shere’a graduated from Cal State Hayward, where she earned her Bachelor’s degree, and later pursued an MBA in Finance at Holy Names University in Oakland. Monica Simmons is the Executive Producer of the documentary and head of production and film development for HNTT Productions. Shere'a, HNTT Productions CEO states, "For too long our stories have been left behind. It is HNTTP's goal is to bring forth the change needed in the entertainment industry by becoming the 'Head and Not The Tail' in this business".    HNTTProductions.com


Huang L.,University of Pennsylvania | Frideger M.,Holy Names University | Pearce J.L.,University of California at Irvine | Pearce J.L.,The London School of Economics and Political Science
Journal of Applied Psychology | Year: 2013

We propose and test a new theory explaining glass-ceiling bias against nonnative speakers as driven by perceptions that nonnative speakers have weak political skill. Although nonnative accent is a complex signal, its effects on assessments of the speakers' political skill are something that speakers can actively mitigate; this makes it an important bias to understand. In Study 1, White and Asian nonnative speakers using the same scripted responses as native speakers were found to be significantly less likely to be recommended for a middle-management position, and this bias was fully mediated by assessments of their political skill. The alternative explanations of race, communication skill, and collaborative skill were nonsignificant. In Study 2, entrepreneurial start-up pitches from national high-technology, newventure funding competitions were shown to experienced executive MBA students. Nonnative speakers were found to have a significantly lower likelihood of receiving new-venture funding, and this was fully mediated by the coders' assessments of their political skill. The entrepreneurs' race, communication skill, and collaborative skill had no effect. We discuss the value of empirically testing various posited reasons for glass-ceiling biases, how the importance and ambiguity of political skill for executive success serve as an ostensibly meritocratic cover for nonnative speaker bias, and other theoretical and practical implications of this work. © 2013 American Psychological Association.


Stryker J.B.,Holy Names University | Santoro M.D.,Lehigh University | Farris G.F.,Rutgers University
IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management | Year: 2012

Despite the increasing use of electronically mediated communication when team members are not collocated, research continues to underline the importance of face-to-face (F2F) communication for the successful accomplishment of complex team tasks. Although a crucial aspect of F2F communication is the physical proximity of participants, studies that have explored the relationship between the design of the physical workplace and F2F communication have produced conflicting findings. The results of this field study conducted at two R&D sites of a large Midwestern U.S. pharmaceutical company suggest that the typical space planning solution of simply moving people from closed offices to open cubicles does not, in and of itself, increase F2F communication. We found that the visibility of the work environment and the amount of collaboration opportunity, defined as formal and informal space available for meetings and collaboration, are related to F2F communication. The implications of our findings for theory, future research, and management practice are discussed. © 1988-2012 IEEE.


Stryker J.B.,Holy Names University | Santoro M.D.,Lehigh University
Research Technology Management | Year: 2012

Despite the increasing use of electronically mediated methods for team communications, research continues to underline the importance of face-to-face (F2F) communication for the successful accomplishment of complex, high-tech team tasks. Although a crucial aspect of F2F communication is the physical proximity of team members, studies that have explored the relationship between the design of the physical workplace and F2F communication have produced conflicting findings. This paper reports the results of a field study conducted at two R&D sites of a large U.S. high technology and life sciences company; the results suggest that the typical space planning solution of simply moving people from closed offices to open cubicles does not in and of itself increase F2F communication. Rather, the level of F2F communication depends on the location of team members' workstations within the overall configuration of the space and the amount of space provided to support collaboration opportunities, including both formal and informal spaces. Based on the results of the study, we offer suggestions for the layout and design of R&D workstations to foster productive F2F encounters.


Bode C.A.,University of California at Berkeley | Limm M.P.,Holy Names University | Power M.E.,University of California at Berkeley | Finlay J.C.,University of Minnesota
Remote Sensing of Environment | Year: 2014

Solar radiation flux, irradiance, is a fundamental driver of almost all hydrological and biological processes. Ecological models of these processes often require data at the watershed scale. GIS-based solar models that predict insolation at the watershed scale take topographic shading into account, but do not account for vegetative shading. Most methods that quantify subcanopy insolation do so only at a single point. Further, subcanopy model calibration requires significant field effort and knowledge of characteristics (species composition, leaf area index & mean leaf angle for each species), and upscaling to watersheds is a significant source of uncertainty.We propose an approach to modeling insolation that uses airborne LiDAR data to estimate canopy openness as a Light Penetration Index (LPI). We couple LPI with the GRASS GIS r.sun solar model to produce the Subcanopy Solar Radiation model (SSR). SSR accounts for both topographic shading and vegetative shading at a landscape scale.After calibrating the r.sun model to a weather station at our study site, we compare SSR model predictions to black thermopile pyranometer field measurements and to hemispherical photographs using Gap Light Analyzer software, a standard method for point estimation of subcanopy radiation. Both SSR and hemispherical models exhibit a similar linear relationship with pyranometer data, and the models predict similar total solar radiation flux across the range of canopy openness. This approach allows prediction of light regimes at watershed scales with resolution that was previously possible only for local point measurements. © 2014.


Plunkett L.,Holy Names University | Chapman K.,University of California at Santa Barbara
Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical | Year: 2016

We describe a new algorithm, the reflection method, to generate off-lattice random walks of specified, though arbitrarily large, thickness in R3 and prove that our method is ergodic on the space of thick walks. The data resulting from our implementation of this method is consistent with the scaling of the squared radius of gyration of random walks, with no thickness constraint. Based on this, we use the data to describe the complex relationship between the presence and nature of knotting and size, thickness and shape of the random walk. We extend the current understanding of excluded volume by expanding the range of analysis of how the squared radius of gyration scales with length and thickness. We also examine the profound effect of thickness on knotting in open chains. We will quantify how thickness effects the size of thick open chains, calculating the growth exponent for squared radius of gyration as a function of thickness. We will also show that for radius r ≤ 0.4, increasing thickness by 0.1 decreases the probability of knot formation by 50% or more. © 2016 IOP Publishing Ltd.


Ricci P.F.,Holy Names University
International Journal of Environment and Health | Year: 2010

Acceptability and perception drive risky environmental heath and safety decisions: protecting against nearly infinitesimal risks can involve expenditures of millions or billions of dollars. Societal decision-makers and individual taxpayers are asked to understand numbers that span over more than 15 orders of magnitude, numbers with which most individuals lack experience. For example, we perceived real estate values will continue to rise, and lenders, in part misperceiving the potential risks of defaults, lent to more than 7 million high-risk borrowers: more than a trillion dollars were involved in the sub-prime loans market disaster. Even when public agencies or industry perform a health or safety assessment and demonstrate low risk, such assertions are not sufficient justification for those at risk to accept as minimal guarantees of safety, as the Challenger disaster shows. However, to assert that a risk is correctly perceived and acceptable requires understanding of 'acceptable risk' numbers, otherwise any 'acceptable risk criterion' to justify a choice can hardly be meaningful. This paper's synthesis of theoretical and experimental aspects integrates decision-theoretic, behavioural and neurological results, including surprising or paradoxical choices. Copyright © 2010 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

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