Holst Center

Eindhoven, Netherlands

Holst Center

Eindhoven, Netherlands
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According to Zion Research, "global demand for the flexible electronics market was valued at $5.13 billion in 2015 and is expected to generate revenue of $16.5 billion by 2021, growing at a CAGR of slightly above 21 percent between 2016 and 2021." Key elements of the market include flex displays, sensors, batteries, and memory. Applications also abound in the automotive, consumer electronics, healthcare, and industrial sectors. While technology advancement and accelerating to manufacturing are the primary themes of the FLEX Conference, applications and business trends are highlighted on the opening day: Sessions are planned for FHE manufacturing, standards and reliability, substrates, conductors, inspection, encapsulation and coating, nanoparticle inks, direct write, and 3D printing, among others. Well-known companies will present, such as Molex, Panasonic, Eastman Chemical, and Northrup Grumman, as well as leading universities, and the U.S. Army and U.S. Air Force Research Laboratories. Among the R&D organizations presenting at 2017FLEX are CEA-LITEN (France), ETRI (South Korea), Flexible Electronics & Display Center (USA), Fraunhofer Institute (Germany), Holst Center (Netherlands), National Research Council (Canada), PARC (USA), and VTT (Finland). Topics of the presentations range from new forms of flexible substrates to TFT and OLED pilot lines to printed health monitoring sensors. The exhibit floor, short courses and networking opportunities round out the event, as well as many member-only meetings. FlexTech, the Nano-Bio Manufacturing Consortium (NBMC) and NextFlex hold member and planning meetings for the governing councils, technical councils and technology working groups. Initiatives in manufacturing, mobile power, e-health, as well as project proposals will be discussed, all buoyed by the information shared during the technical conference. For more information on 2017FLEX, please visit:  www.semi.org/en/2017-flex SEMI® connects nearly 2,000 member companies and 250,000 professionals worldwide annually to advance the technology and business of electronics manufacturing. SEMI members are responsible for the innovations in materials, design, equipment, software, and services that enable smarter, faster, more powerful, and more affordable electronic products. Since 1970, SEMI has built connections that have helped its members grow, create new markets, and address common industry challenges together. SEMI maintains offices in Bangalore, Beijing, Berlin, Brussels, Grenoble, Hsinchu, Seoul, Shanghai, Silicon Valley (Milpitas, Calif.), Singapore, Tokyo, and Washington, D.C.  For more information, visit www.semi.org and follow SEMI on LinkedIn  and Twitter. FlexTech, a SEMI Strategic Association Partner, is focused on growth, profitability, and success throughout the manufacturing and distribution chain of flexible hybrid electronics, by developing solutions for advancing these technologies from R&D to commercialization. Visit FlexTech at www.flextech.org and follow FlexTech on LinkedIn and Twitter.


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: phys.org

Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are the light sources of the future. Luminescent paintwork on cars, colorful living room walls and kitchen ceilings that light up, billboards of a very different kind – all this will now be conceivable. Last year the EU project TREASORES, coordinated by Empa, created flexible, transparent electrodes, the basis for supple, rollable OLEDs. Acquiring the experience to fabricate and functionalize the multi-layered structures of OLEDs light sources is the next step forward. After all, manufacturing a homogenously lit wallpaper is anything but trivial. Thus, expertise from the industry is urgently called for. Anand Verma brings these expertise and know-how to the table. He started his career as a professional conventional printer at India Today after obtaining a Bachelor of Engineering in printing and media technology from Manipal Insititute of Technology. He extended his knowledge to the developing field of printed electronics by gaining a Master's degree at Chemnitz University of Technology (Germany). With his extensive research work on OLEDs in cooperation with Holst Center in Eindhoven (Netherlands), Novaled (Germany) and Cynora GmbH (Germany), he gained expertise to develop inks and new printing processes for OLED fabrication. At Empa, as a coating / printing expert his area of research involves developing wet coating and printing for the Coating Competence Center (CCC). At CCC, he works on printing perovskite solar cells, actuators, and the like. Besides, he continues to explore the printing of flexible OLEDs on various substrates. "I can estimate optimal layer architectures, which will function in OLEDs depending on the substrates being investigated," says Verma. "So I also know the process parameters that need to optimized besides ink composition." Most of the light sources we are familiar with are point light sources or neon tubes. OLEDs, on the other hand, are surface lights. "If you look at OLED structure," explains the Empa researcher, "they consist of multiple nanometer-thin layers." The positively charged anode usually consists of transparent indium tin oxide (ITO), which can be used to produce electrically conductive windows or films. This is followed by an organic semiconductor layer (poly 3, 4-ethylenedioxythiophene polystyrenesulfonate, PEDOT:PSS), a light emitting layer (Super Yellow, fluorescent color), calcium for work function and a cathode, usually made of aluminum. It takes up to three days to produce a batch of OLEDs. First of all, it is important to clean the ITO substrate carefully as even tiny specks will show up on the finished product later on – especially because the layers are only a few nanometers thin. Electronically and morphologically stable layer architecture differentiates between a good and bad performing OLED: "Generally, the thinner the layers, the higher the risk of inhomogeneity during wet coating. On the other hand: if the layers are thicker, a higher turn-on voltage is needed to achieve the same luminosity," says Verma. After the cleaning phase, the substrate is treated with an oxygen plasma: it is bombarded with ions to increase the surface energy, which facilitates wetting behavior of inks thus obtaining a homogeneous layer. It is important for the substrate's surface energy to be higher than that of the ink being coated. "Depending on the surface energy of the material and surface tension of the ink, it either wets the surface or it de-wets it. However, in some cases treating the substrate is not enough. When producing the ink – for the next layer of material – Verma first has to work out the right solvent in the ideal concentration to achieve the desired surface energy level, required thickness and morphology. Moreover, the solvent should be as environmentally friendly as possible. "If we chose chloroform, for instance," says Verma, "this would have a harmful impact on health during the production phase because rather high quantities of it are required." One of the used inks is Super Yellow. The most important layer is the light-emitting one. It is crucial for the researcher to already make this ink 24 hours beforehand as it takes that long for the solvent to dissolve in the dye. In contrast to the previous layers, calcium and subsequently aluminum is vacuum evaporated. To do so, the printing specialist has to use a glove box including a vacuum chamber to prevent the oxidation of calcium. Why opt for such a sensitive metal? "You could also use a different one. But all those that make suitable candidates are in the same group in the periodic table; they all oxidize." To use the fabricated devices in ambient conditions, Verma has to encapsulate the finished OLED to protect it from oxidation and moisture. This requires another layer made of transparent film or glass and special glue, which hardens under influence of UV light. The tests involving the different substrates and the carriers for these flexible OLEDs will run until Empa's demonstrators light up reliably. Anand Verma is already thinking of the next step: "Printing and coating devices at Empa's new Coating Competence Center would already be capable of producing OLED patterns or surfaces on a larger scale." The lighting from the lab is within reach. Explore further: Why you should get ready to say goodbye to the humble lightbulb


16th Annual Conference and Exhibit is More Comprehensive and Global MILPITAS, Calif., May 16, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- FlexTech's annual Flexible Electronics Conference and Exhibit – 2017FLEX – is set for the Hyatt Regency Hotel & Spa in Monterey, Calif. from June 19-22, 2017. Consistently attracting 500+ registrants, the event is the premier technology conference for the emerging flexible electronics industry. Twenty-six sessions will cover the landscape of flexible hybrid electronics and printed electronics, including R&D, manufacturing and applications. Short courses and networking events round out 2017FLEX. According to Zion Research, "global demand for the flexible electronics market was valued at $5.13 billion in 2015 and is expected to generate revenue of $16.5 billion by 2021, growing at a CAGR of slightly above 21 percent between 2016 and 2021." Key elements of the market include flex displays, sensors, batteries, and memory. Applications also abound in the automotive, consumer electronics, healthcare, and industrial sectors. While technology advancement and accelerating to manufacturing are the primary themes of the FLEX Conference, applications and business trends are highlighted on the opening day: Sessions are planned for FHE manufacturing, standards and reliability, substrates, conductors, inspection, encapsulation and coating, nanoparticle inks, direct write, and 3D printing, among others. Well-known companies will present, such as Molex, Panasonic, Eastman Chemical, and Northrup Grumman, as well as leading universities, and the U.S. Army and U.S. Air Force Research Laboratories. Among the R&D organizations presenting at 2017FLEX are CEA-LITEN (France), ETRI (South Korea), Flexible Electronics & Display Center (USA), Fraunhofer Institute (Germany), Holst Center (Netherlands), National Research Council (Canada), PARC (USA), and VTT (Finland). Topics of the presentations range from new forms of flexible substrates to TFT and OLED pilot lines to printed health monitoring sensors. The exhibit floor, short courses and networking opportunities round out the event, as well as many member-only meetings. FlexTech, the Nano-Bio Manufacturing Consortium (NBMC) and NextFlex hold member and planning meetings for the governing councils, technical councils and technology working groups. Initiatives in manufacturing, mobile power, e-health, as well as project proposals will be discussed, all buoyed by the information shared during the technical conference. For more information on 2017FLEX, please visit:  www.semi.org/en/2017-flex SEMI® connects nearly 2,000 member companies and 250,000 professionals worldwide annually to advance the technology and business of electronics manufacturing. SEMI members are responsible for the innovations in materials, design, equipment, software, and services that enable smarter, faster, more powerful, and more affordable electronic products. Since 1970, SEMI has built connections that have helped its members grow, create new markets, and address common industry challenges together. SEMI maintains offices in Bangalore, Beijing, Berlin, Brussels, Grenoble, Hsinchu, Seoul, Shanghai, Silicon Valley (Milpitas, Calif.), Singapore, Tokyo, and Washington, D.C.  For more information, visit www.semi.org and follow SEMI on LinkedIn  and Twitter. FlexTech, a SEMI Strategic Association Partner, is focused on growth, profitability, and success throughout the manufacturing and distribution chain of flexible hybrid electronics, by developing solutions for advancing these technologies from R&D to commercialization. Visit FlexTech at www.flextech.org and follow FlexTech on LinkedIn and Twitter.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 4.56M | Year: 2016

Today we use many objects not normally associated with computers or the internet. These include gas meters and lights in our homes, healthcare devices, water distribution systems and cars. Increasingly, such objects are digitally connected and some are transitioning from cellular network connections (M2M) to using the internet: e.g. smart meters and cars - ultimately self-driving cars may revolutionise transport. This trend is driven by numerous forces. The connection of objects and use of their data can cut costs (e.g. allowing remote control of processes) creates new business opportunities (e.g. tailored consumer offerings), and can lead to new services (e.g. keeping older people safe in their homes). This vision of interconnected physical objects is commonly referred to as the Internet of Things. The examples above not only illustrate the vast potential of such technology for economic and societal benefit, they also hint that such a vision comes with serious challenges and threats. For example, information from a smart meter can be used to infer when people are at home, and an autonomous car must make quick decisions of moral dimensions when faced with a child running across on a busy road. This means the Internet of Things needs to evolve in a trustworthy manner that individuals can understand and be comfortable with. It also suggests that the Internet of Things needs to be resilient against active attacks from organised crime, terror organisations or state-sponsored aggressors. Therefore, this project creates a Hub for research, development, and translation for the Internet of Things, focussing on privacy, ethics, trust, reliability, acceptability, and security/safety: PETRAS, (also suggesting rock-solid foundations) for the Internet of Things. The Hub will be designed and run as a social and technological platform. It will bring together UK academic institutions that are recognised international research leaders in this area, with users and partners from various industrial sectors, government agencies, and NGOs such as charities, to get a thorough understanding of these issues in terms of the potentially conflicting interests of private individuals, companies, and political institutions; and to become a world-leading centre for research, development, and innovation in this problem space. Central to the Hub approach is the flexibility during the research programme to create projects that explore issues through impactful co-design with technical and social science experts and stakeholders, and to engage more widely with centres of excellence in the UK and overseas. Research themes will cut across all projects: Privacy and Trust; Safety and Security; Adoption and Acceptability; Standards, Governance, and Policy; and Harnessing Economic Value. Properly understanding the interaction of these themes is vital, and a great social, moral, and economic responsibility of the Hub in influencing tomorrows Internet of Things. For example, a secure system that does not adequately respect privacy, or where there is the mere hint of such inadequacy, is unlikely to prove acceptable. Demonstrators, like wearable sensors in health care, will be used to explore and evaluate these research themes and their tension. New solutions are expected to come out of the majority of projects and demonstrators, many solutions will be generalisable to problems in other sectors, and all projects will produce valuable insights. A robust governance and management structure will ensure good management of the research portfolio, excellent user engagement and focussed coordination of impact from deliverables. The Hub will further draw on the expertise, networks, and on-going projects of its members to create a cross-disciplinary language for sharing problems and solutions across research domains, industrial sectors, and government departments. This common language will enhance the outreach, development, and training activities of the Hub.


News Article | February 23, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

DuPont Electronics & Communications (DuPont) and Holst Centre today announced the third extension of their successful long-term collaboration, which is focused on advanced materials for the printed electronics industry. As a full partner in the Printed Electronics program, DuPont will contribute new materials and research samples targeted toward Holst’s active projects in the areas of wearable electronics, in-mold electronics, consumer electronics and healthcare. “We’re pleased to extend our collaboration with Holst Centre, continuing to work together in advancing new developments in printed electronics,” said Kerry Adams, printed electronics market segment manager, DuPont. “In addition to advancing the technology, the collaboration provides us with valuable insights into the needs and requirements of other Holst partners, including end-users and equipment suppliers, enabling open innovation and accelerating product and application development.” In this next phase, the emphasis of the collaboration will be on developing and testing complete complementary material systems and successfully creating working demonstrators and prototypes, with the development of commercial products as the end goal. In particular, the collaboration will focus on screen printed and ink-jet electronic inks and pastes, flat bed and roll-to-roll processing, and conventional oven as well as photonic curing/sintering systems. Over the life of the DuPont/Holst Centre collaboration, results have included the development of new nano-Ag inks and pastes, leading to the commercialization of DuPont’s best in class conductive ink-jet silver ink, PE410, announced and featured at LOPEC in Munich, Germany, in April 2016. Most recently, Holst presented their wearable smart shirt design in the DuPont booth at the Wearables Expo in Tokyo, Japan, from Jan. 18-20, 2017. Other achievements have included the successful implementation of DuPont inks and pastes enabling production of smart garments, flexible sensors and smart blister medical packaging, as well as in-mold electronics, and Organic Photovoltaic (OPV) and Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED) lighting demos and prototypes. “The collaboration between DuPont and Holst Centre continues to drive exciting advancements in printed electronics,” said Jeroen van den Brand, program director ‘printed electronics’, Holst Centre. “We are excited to continue to explore new technologies and opportunities alongside a recognized industry leader.” DuPont will showcase the latest developments in wearable electronics, in-mold electronics, consumer electronics and healthcare at stand B0 308 at LOPEC, the International Exhibition and Conference for Printed Electronics, March 28 – 30, 2017, in Munich, Germany. Holst Centre is an independent open-innovation R&D centre that develops generic technologies for wireless sensor technologies and flexible electronics, that contribute to answering global societal challenges in healthcare, lifestyle, sustainability and the Internet of Things. A key feature of Holst Centre is its partnership model with industry and academia around shared roadmaps and programs. It is this kind of cross-fertilization that enables Holst Centre to tune its scientific strategy to industrial needs. Holst Centre was set up in 2005 by imec (Flanders, Belgium) and TNO (The Netherlands) with support from the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs and the Government of Flanders. Holst Centre has over 200 employees from around 28 nationalities and a commitment from more than 50 industrial partners. For more information about Holst Centre, please visit http://www.holstcentre.com. DuPont Electronics & Communications is a leading innovator and high-volume supplier of electronic inks and pastes that offers a broad range of printed electronic materials commercially available today. The growing portfolio of DuPont electronic inks is used in many applications, including forming conductive traces, capacitor and resistor elements, and dielectric and encapsulating layers that are compatible with many substrate surfaces including polymer, glass and ceramic. For more information, visit http://www.advancedmaterials.dupont.com. DuPont (NYSE: DD) has been bringing world-class science and engineering to the global marketplace in the form of innovative products, materials, and services since 1802. The company believes that by collaborating with customers, governments, NGOs, and thought leaders we can help find solutions to such global challenges as providing enough healthy food for people everywhere, decreasing dependence on fossil fuels, and protecting life and the environment. For additional information about DuPont and its commitment to inclusive innovation, please visit http://www.dupont.com. Forward-Looking Statements: This document contains forward-looking statements which may be identified by their use of words like “plans,” “expects,” “will,” “believes,” “intends,” “estimates,” “anticipates” or other words of similar meaning. All statements that address expectations or projections about the future, including statements about the company’s strategy for growth, product development, regulatory approval, market position, anticipated benefits of recent acquisitions, timing of anticipated benefits from restructuring actions, outcome of contingencies, such as litigation and environmental matters, expenditures and financial results, are forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and are based on certain assumptions and expectations of future events which may not be realized. Forward-looking statements also involve risks and uncertainties, many of which are beyond the company’s control. Some of the important factors that could cause the company’s actual results to differ materially from those projected in any such forward-looking statements are: fluctuations in energy and raw material prices; failure to develop and market new products and optimally manage product life cycles; ability to respond to market acceptance, rules, regulations and policies affecting products based on biotechnology and, in general, for products for the agriculture industry; outcome of significant litigation and environmental matters, including realization of associated indemnification assets, if any; failure to appropriately manage process safety and product stewardship issues; changes in laws and regulations or political conditions; global economic and capital markets conditions, such as inflation, interest and currency exchange rates; business or supply disruptions; security threats, such as acts of sabotage, terrorism or war, natural disasters and weather events and patterns which could affect demand as well as availability of products for the agriculture industry; ability to protect and enforce the company’s intellectual property rights; successful integration of acquired businesses and separation of underperforming or non-strategic assets or businesses; and risks related to the agreement entered on December 11, 2015, with The Dow Chemical Company pursuant to which the companies have agreed to effect an all-stock merger of equals, including the completion of the proposed transaction on anticipated terms and timing, the ability to fully and timely realize the expected benefits of the proposed transaction and risks related to the intended business separations contemplated to occur after the completion of the proposed transaction. The company undertakes no duty to update any forward-looking statements as a result of future developments or new information.


Gelinck G.,Holst Center | Heremans P.,IMEC | Heremans P.,Catholic University of Leuven | Nomoto K.,Sony Corporation | Anthopoulos T.D.,Imperial College London
Advanced Materials | Year: 2010

Organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) offer unprecedented opportunities for implementation in a broad range of technological applications spanning from large-volume microelectronics and optical displays to chemical and biological sensors. In this Progress Report, we review the application of organic transistors in the fields of flexible optical displays and microelectronics. The advantages associated with the use of OTFT technology are discussed with primary emphasis on the latest developments in the area of active-matrix electrophoretic and organic light-emitting diode displays based on OTFT backplanes and on the application of organic transistors in microelectronics including digital and analog circuits. © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.


Michels J.J.,Holst Center | Moons E.,Karlstad University
Macromolecules | Year: 2013

The formation of the surface-induced stratified lamellar composition profile experimentally evidenced in spincoated layers of the photovoltaic donor-acceptor blend consisting of poly[(9,9-dioctylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl)-co-5,5- (4′,7′-di-2-thienyl-2′,1′,3′-benzothiadiazole]/ phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (APFO-3/PCBM), as processed from chloroform, is simulated using square gradient theory extended with terms describing the interaction of the blend components with the air and substrate interfaces. The surface energy contributions have been formulated based on an enthalpic nearest-neighbor model which allows integration of common surface tension theory and experimentally accessible surface energies of the fluid phase constituents with a mean field description of a multicomponent blend confined by substrate and air interfaces. Using estimates for the quench depth and transport properties of the blend components as a function of polymer concentration, the time-resolved numerical simulations yield results that compare favorably with experimental observations, both in terms of the number of lamellae as a function of the blend layer thickness and their compositional order. The effect of blend ratio is reproduced as well, the lamellar pattern becoming more pronounced if the amount of PCBM increases relative to APFO-3. © 2013 American Chemical Society.


Moonen P.F.,MESA Institute for Nanotechnology | Yakimets I.,Holst Center | Huskens J.,MESA Institute for Nanotechnology
Advanced Materials | Year: 2012

In this report, the development of conventional, mass-printing strategies into high-resolution, alternative patterning techniques is reviewed with the focus on large-area patterning of flexible thin-film transistors (TFTs) for display applications. In the first part, conventional and digital printing techniques are introduced and categorized as far as their development is relevant for this application area. The limitations of conventional printing guides the reader to the second part of the progress report: alternative-lithographic patterning on low-cost flexible foils for the fabrication of flexible TFTs. Soft and nanoimprint lithography-based patterning techniques and their limitations are surveyed with respect to patterning on low-cost flexible foils. These show a shift from fabricating simple microlense structures to more complicated, high-resolution electronic devices. The development of alternative, low-temperature processable materials and the introduction of high-resolution patterning strategies will lead to the low-cost, self-aligned fabrication of flexible displays and solar cells from cheaper but better performing organic materials. In this Progress Report, the development of conventional, mass-printing strategies into high-resolution, alternative-lithographic patterning techniques is reviewed with the focus on large-area patterning of thin-film transistors on low-cost flexible substrates. Conventional and alternative, high-resolution soft and nanoimprint lithography-based techniques are covered, their benefits, requirements and limitations are discussed, and recent developments and electronic device applications, mainly in the direction of displays, on flexible foils are give. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

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