Hokkaido Information University

www.do-johodai.ac.jp
Ebetsu, Japan

Hokkaido Information University is a private university in Ebetsu, Ishikari Subprefecture, Hokkaidō, Japan. It was initially established in April 1968 with the name Hokkaido Electronics Computer School. Since 1989, Hokkaido Information University became the officially adopted name. Currently it holds international exchange agreements with Nanjing University, Shenyang Normal University in China; University of California, Santa Cruz in USA; and Rajamangala University of Technology in Thailand. Wikipedia.

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Fukumitsu M.,Hokkaido Information University | Hasegawa S.,Tohoku University
Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics) | Year: 2015

In recent years, Fischlin and Fleischhacker showed the impossibility of proving the security of specific types of FS-type signatures, the signatures constructed by the Fiat-Shamir transformation, via a single-instance reduction in the non-programmable random oracle model (NPROM, for short). In this paper, we pose a question whether or not the impossibility of proving the security of any FS-type signature can be shown in the NPROM. For this question, we show that each FS-type signature cannot be proven to be secure via a key-preserving reduction in the NPROM from the security against the impersonation of the underlying identification scheme under the passive attack, as long as the identification scheme is secure against the impersonation under the active attack. We also show the security incompatibility between the discrete logarithm assumption and the security of the Schnorr signature via a singleinstance key-preserving reduction, whereas Fischlin and Fleischhacker showed that such an incompatibility cannot be proven via a non-keypreserving reduction. © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015.


Maita N.,Tokushima University | Tsukimura T.,Meiji Pharmaceutical University | Taniguchi T.,Tokushima University | Saito S.,Hokkaido Information University | And 3 more authors.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America | Year: 2013

N-glycosylation is a major posttranslational modification that endows proteins with various functions. It is established that N-glycans are essential for the correct folding and stability of some enzymes; however, the actual effects of N-glycans on their activities are poorly understood. Here, we show that human α-L-iduronidase (hIDUA), of which a dysfunction causes accumulation of dermatan/heparan sulfate leading to mucopolysaccharidosis type I, uses its own N-glycan as a substrate binding and catalytic module. Structural analysis revealed that the mannose residue of the N-glycan attached to N372 constituted a part of the substrate-binding pocket and interacted directly with a substrate. A deglycosylation study showed that enzyme activity was highly correlated with the N-glycan attached to N372. The kinetics of native and deglycosylated hIDUA suggested that the N-glycan is also involved in catalytic processes. Our study demonstrates a previously unrecognized function of N-glycans.


Ando M.,Hokkaido Information University
Electronic Journal of Combinatorics | Year: 2013

In this paper, we give combinatorial proofs and new generalizations of q-series identities of Dilcher and Uchimura related to divisor function. Some interesting combinatorial results related to partition and arm-length are also presented.


Saito S.,Hokkaido Information University | Ohno K.,Chiyoda Corporation | Sakuraba H.,Meiji Pharmaceutical University
PLoS ONE | Year: 2013

Missense mutations in the α-galactosidase A (GLA) gene comprising the majority of mutations responsible for Fabry disease result in heterogeneous phenotypes ranging from the early onset severe "classic" form to the "later-onset" milder form. To elucidate the molecular basis of Fabry disease from the viewpoint of structural biology, we comprehensively examined the effects of different substitutions at the same residue in the amino acid sequence of GLA on the structural change in the enzyme molecule and the clinical phenotype by calculating the number of atoms affected and the root-mean-squaredistance value, and by coloring of the atoms influenced by the amino acid replacements. The results revealed that the severity of the structural change influences the disease progression, i.e., a small structural change tends to lead to the lateronset form and a large one to the classic form. Furthermore, the study revealed the residues important for expression of the GLA activity, i.e., residues involved in construction of the active site, a disulfide bond or a dimer. Structural study from such a viewpoint is useful for elucidating the basis of Fabry disease. © 2013 Saito et al.


Saito Y.,Hokkaido Information University
Proceedings - 2015 International Conference on Culture and Computing, Culture and Computing 2015 | Year: 2015

This paper presents the scatter plots representing the relative frequencies of nouns used in the texts of Japanese classical literature. These scatter plots are not designed as tools for reading the texts analytically but as visual arts. The readers will become attached to the archaic words through enjoying the illogical synergy between the literary works and the art works. © 2015 IEEE.


Nishihira J.,Hokkaido Information University
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences | Year: 2012

Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a unique protein that participates in inflammation, immune responses, and cell growth. An array of in vitro and in vivo experiments has demonstrated that MIF is profoundly involved in the pathogenesis of acute and chronic inflammatory disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Blockade of MIF bioactivities by either neutralizing anti-MIF antibodies or antagonists prevents inflammatory cytokine cascade, which strongly suggests that an anti-MIF therapeutic strategy is feasible for treatment of IBD. Recently, we developed a new therapeutic approach for IBD by administration of antisense MIF oligonucleotides in conjugation with schizophyllan (SPG), a member of the glucan family. SPG specifically binds Dectin-1 expressed in antigen-presenting cells (APCs), and the antisense MIF/SPG complex is incorporated into the cells. In in vivo experiments of colitis models in mice, we found that intraperitoneal administration of the complex ameliorated the clinical signs of colitis and improved the histological scores. This novel therapy designed to knock down the MIF production in APCs is expected to be clinically applicable for the treatment of IBD. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.


Ozaki H.,Hokkaido Information University | Kara A.,University of Aizu
IEEE Transactions on Reliability | Year: 2011

In this paper, we investigate the user perceived reliability of M-for-N shared protection systems. The M-for-N shared protection system is a general type of the fault-tolerant configuration with shared backup units. We assume that there are N working units each serving a single group of users and M shared protection (spare) units in the system. We also assume that the time to failure of the unit is subject to an exponential distribution, and the time to repair it is subject to a general distribution. Under these assumptions, we derive the Laplace transform of the reliability function (The cdf of the failure time, i.e. the cumulative distribution function of the time beyond which the system will survive) for each user, as well as the user-perceived Mean Time to First Failure (MTTFF) by combining the state transition analysis and the supplementary variable method. We also show the effect of the repair time distribution of the units through the case study of the cloud computing systems in which N service-independent servers share M spares for backup purpose. The analysis reveals that there exist optimal values for M and N in terms of the reliability and the cost for the given conditions of failures and repairs. © 2006 IEEE.


Anada Y.,Hokkaido Information University
Macromolecular Symposia | Year: 2016

Motion of impurity ions in solid state of poly(ethylene telephthalate) (PET) was investigated by the method of broad band dielectric spectroscopy in a frequency range lower than 10 Hz. In this experiment, the conductivity relaxation time of the ion motion analyzed from the frequency dispersion of the electric modulus. The conductivity relaxation time for PET is evaluated at 0.53 at 100°C. This value is similar to those of low density polyethylene and poly(vinyl chloride) plasticized with dioctyl phthalate (p-PVC) but smaller than those of isotactic polypropylene. In a plot of conductivity relaxation time vs. permittivity, the location of PET is relatively nearby p-PVC. This result suggests that the inhomogeneity in non-crystalline part in PET is relatively similar to that of amorphous polymer of p-PVC rather than other polymers in this study. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim


Anada Y.,Hokkaido Information University
Energy Procedia | Year: 2013

In melt-crystallized polymers, free spaces with inhomogeneous size exist between crystallites. These free spaces results from non-crystalline polymer molecules which are not taken in into the crystallites. These free spaces become a path for impurity ions to move. The ionic motion along such path with the inhomogeneity affects the electrical properties of polymer materials. In order to study the effect of such ionic motions on energy loss, the interaction between ionic motion and inhomogeneous structure on the electrical properties was investigated. For this objective, the permittivity and the electric modulus were observed for isotactic poly(propylene) (iPP) and plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) with dioctyl phthalate (p-PVC) by means of the Broadband Dielectric Spectroscopy. A simple DC conduction is observed for p-PVC. However, for the iPP, another ionic motion appears on lower frequency side in addition to the DC conduction at high temperature. This change of ionic motion is considered to be caused by a phase transition in crystalline phase accompanied by a structural change in the non-crystalline part. © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.


Kita T.,Hokkaido University | Kita T.,Asahikawa University | Yoshioka E.,Hokkaido University | Yoshioka E.,Asahikawa University | And 5 more authors.
Diabetes Care | Year: 2012

OBJECTIVE - To investigate whether a difference in the risk for diabetes exists in Japanese workers with regard to sleep duration/quality and the presence or absence of a family history of diabetes (FHD). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - The researchers conducted a prospective, occupational-based study of local government employees in Sapporo, Japan. Between April 2003 and March 2004, 3,570 nondiabetic participants, aged 35-55 years, underwent annual health checkups and completed a self-administered questionnaire that included information on sleep duration/quality and FHD at baseline. Having diabetes was defined as taking medication for diabetes or a fasting plasma glucose level of ≥126 mg/dL at follow-up (2007-2008). RESULTS - A total of 121 (3.4%) new cases of diabetes were reported. In multivariate logistic regression models of workers without an FHD, and after adjustment for potential confounding factors, the odds ratio (95% CI) for developing diabetes was 5.37 (1.38-20.91) in those with a sleep duration of ≤5 h compared with those with a sleep duration of >7 h. Other risk factors were awakening during the night (5.03 [1.43-17.64]), self-perceived insufficient sleep duration (6.76 [2.09-21.87]), and unsatisfactory overall quality of sleep (3.71 [1.37-10.07]). In subjects with an FHD, these associations were either absent or weaker. CONCLUSIONS - The current study shows that poor sleep is associated with a higher risk of developing diabetes in workers without an FHD. Promoting healthy sleeping habits may be effective for preventing the development of diabetes in people without an FHD. © 2012 by the American Diabetes Association.

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