United States
United States

Time filter

Source Type

News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

A joint research led by Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) and the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) has assembled the 1.64 gigabytes genome of a deep-sea mussel, which is roughly equivalent to 50% of the size of human genome. This is the first decoded genome among all deep-sea macrobenthic animals, revealing a complete set of DNA. The discovery gives wider insights into future research on the mechanisms of symbiosis in other marine organisms such as giant tubeworms and giant clams. The research team, led by HKUST's Chair Professor of Division of Life Science Professor Pei-Yuan Qian and HKBU's Associate Professor of Biology Dr Jian-Wen Qiu, has published the research findings in prestigious international academic journal Nature Ecology & Evolution in early April. The team used a specimen collected in 2013 during Dr Qiu's participation in China's manned submersible Jiaolong's expedition of the South China Sea for the research. Deep-sea organisms including mussels thrive in the extreme environments of hydrothermal vents and cold seeps which are characterised by high hydrostatic pressure, lack of photosynthesis-derived food, variable temperatures and high concentrations of toxic substances. Despite their ability to survive under stressful conditions, a lack of genomic resources has hindered the understanding of their molecular mechanisms of adaptation. The study sequenced the genome of the deep-sea mussel Bathymodiolus platifrons as well as its shallow-water relative Modiolus philippinarum collected from a local softshore in Tingkok for comparison of genomic features. Through phylogenetic analysis, the research team discovered that modern deep-sea mussels are the descendants of shallow-water mussels, and their ancestors migrated to the deep sea approximately 110 million years ago, providing evidence to support a hypothesis that their ancestors survived through an extinction event during the global anoxia period associated with the Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum which occurred around 57 million years ago. Genome comparison revealed that the great expansion of several gene families in the deep-sea mussel may be related to its adaptation to the deep sea. For instance, the expansion of the "heat shock protein 70 family", a family of proteins that are produced by a cell in response to exposure to stressful conditions, may help the mussel stabilise protein structures. The expansion of the "ABC transporters family", the unit of the transport system, may enhance the mussel's ability to move toxic chemicals outside its gill epithelial cells. The expansion of gene families related to immune recognition, endocytosis and caspase-mediated apoptosis indicates the mussel's adaptation to the presence of chemoautotrophic endosymbionts in its gills. An additional proteomic analysis of the deep-sea mussel gill reveals nutritional and energetic dependency of the mussel on its methanotrophic symbionts. Professor Qian said, "The study has provided genomic resources for understanding how the deep-sea mussel has adapted to the abiotic stresses and lack of photosynthesis-derived food in the deep-sea chemosynthetic environment. The general mechanisms of symbiosis revealed in the study are of relevance to other symbiotic organisms such as deep-sea tubeworms and giant clams." Dr Qiu said, "The genomic resources will facilitate various studies, including genetic connectivity among deep-sea populations, which is relevant to the establishment of deep-sea marine reserves." The study was supported by the Strategic Priority Research Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences of China, HKUST, HKBU, Scientific and Technical Innovation Council of Shenzhen, and Guangdong Natural Science Foundation. Other main collaborators are HKUST post-doctoral fellows Dr Jin Sun and Dr Weipeng Zhang, Dr Jerome Hui of The Chinese University of Hong Kong and his team members Wenyan Nong and Fiona Ka Man Cheung, Dr Runsheng Li of Hong Kong Baptist University, Dr Yu Zhang of Shenzhen University, Dr Zhang Yang of The South China Sea Institute of Oceanography, and Christopher Fields of University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The paper is available online at: http://www.


News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: phys.org

(Left) Shell of the deep-sea mussel Bathymodiolus platifrons and (right) shallow-water mussel Modiolus philippinarum. Credit: Hong Kong Baptist University A joint research led by Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) and the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) has assembled the 1.64 gigabytes genome of a deep-sea mussel, which is roughly equivalent to 50% of the size of human genome. This is the first decoded genome among all deep-sea macrobenthic animals, revealing a complete set of DNA. The discovery gives wider insights into future research on the mechanisms of symbiosis in other marine organisms such as giant tubeworms and giant clams. The research team, led by HKUST's Chair Professor of Division of Life Science Professor Pei-Yuan Qian and HKBU's Associate Professor of Biology Dr Jian-Wen Qiu, has published the research findings in prestigious international academic journal Nature Ecology & Evolution in early April. The team used a specimen collected in 2013 during Dr Qiu's participation in China's manned submersible Jiaolong's expedition of the South China Sea for the research. Deep-sea organisms including mussels thrive in the extreme environments of hydrothermal vents and cold seeps which are characterised by high hydrostatic pressure, lack of photosynthesis-derived food, variable temperatures and high concentrations of toxic substances. Despite their ability to survive under stressful conditions, a lack of genomic resources has hindered the understanding of their molecular mechanisms of adaptation. The study sequenced the genome of the deep-sea mussel Bathymodiolus platifrons as well as its shallow-water relative Modiolus philippinarum collected from a local softshore in Tingkok for comparison of genomic features. Through phylogenetic analysis, the research team discovered that modern deep-sea mussels are the descendants of shallow-water mussels, and their ancestors migrated to the deep sea approximately 110 million years ago, providing evidence to support a hypothesis that their ancestors survived through an extinction event during the global anoxia period associated with the Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum which occurred around 57 million years ago. Genome comparison revealed that the great expansion of several gene families in the deep-sea mussel may be related to its adaptation to the deep sea. For instance, the expansion of the "heat shock protein 70 family", a family of proteins that are produced by a cell in response to exposure to stressful conditions, may help the mussel stabilise protein structures. The expansion of the "ABC transporters family", the unit of the transport system, may enhance the mussel's ability to move toxic chemicals outside its gill epithelial cells. The expansion of gene families related to immune recognition, endocytosis and caspase-mediated apoptosis indicates the mussel's adaptation to the presence of chemoautotrophic endosymbionts in its gills. An additional proteomic analysis of the deep-sea mussel gill reveals nutritional and energetic dependency of the mussel on its methanotrophic symbionts. Professor Qian said, "The study has provided genomic resources for understanding how the deep-sea mussel has adapted to the abiotic stresses and lack of photosynthesis-derived food in the deep-sea chemosynthetic environment. The general mechanisms of symbiosis revealed in the study are of relevance to other symbiotic organisms such as deep-sea tubeworms and giant clams." Dr Qiu said, "The genomic resources will facilitate various studies, including genetic connectivity among deep-sea populations, which is relevant to the establishment of deep-sea marine reserves." Explore further: Symbiosis bacteria produce a variety of toxins that appear to save mussels from being eaten More information: Jin Sun et al, Adaptation to deep-sea chemosynthetic environments as revealed by mussel genomes, Nature Ecology & Evolution (2017). DOI: 10.1038/s41559-017-0121


Research jointly led by HKBU and HKUST decoding the first deep-sea mussel genome published in Nature Ecology & Evolution A joint research led by Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) and the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) has assembled the 1.64 gigabytes genome of a deep-sea mussel, which is roughly equivalent to 50% of the size of human genome. This is the first decoded genome among all deep-sea macrobenthic animals, revealing a complete set of DNA. The discovery gives wider insights into future research on the mechanisms of symbiosis in other marine organisms such as giant tubeworms and giant clams. The research team, led by HKUST's Chair Professor of Division of Life Science Professor Pei-Yuan Qian and HKBU's Associate Professor of Biology Dr Jian-Wen Qiu, have published the research findings in the prestigious international academic journal Nature Ecology & Evolution in early April. The team used a specimen collected in 2013 during Dr Qiu's participation in China's manned submersible Jiaolong expedition in the South China Sea for research. Deep-sea organisms including mussels thrive in extreme environments of hydrothermal vents and cold seeps which are characterised by high hydrostatic pressure, lack of photosynthesis-derived food, variable temperatures and high concentrations of toxic substances. Despite their ability to survive under stressful conditions, a lack of genomic resources has hindered the understanding of their molecular mechanisms of adaptation. The study sequenced the genome of the deep-sea mussel Bathymodiolus platifrons as well as its shallow-water relative Modiolus philippinarum collected from a local softshore in Tingkok for comparison of genomic features. Through phylogenetic analysis, the research team discovered that modern deep-sea mussels are the descendants of shallow-water mussels, and their ancestors migrated to the deep sea approximately 110 million years ago, providing evidence to support a hypothesis that their ancestors survived through an extinction event during the global anoxia period associated with the Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum which occurred around 57 million years ago. Genome comparison revealed that the great expansion of several gene families in the deep-sea mussel may be related to its adaptation to the deep sea. For instance, the expansion of the "heat shock protein 70 family", a family of proteins that are produced by a cell in response to exposure to stressful conditions, may help the mussel stabilise protein structures. The expansion of the "ABC transporters family", the unit of the transport system, may enhance the mussel's ability to move toxic chemicals outside its gill epithelial cells. The expansion of gene families related to immune recognition, endocytosis and caspase-mediated apoptosis indicates the mussel's adaptation to the presence of chemoautotrophic endosymbionts in its gills. An additional proteomic analysis of the deep-sea mussel gill reveals nutritional and energetic dependency of the mussel on its methanotrophic symbionts. Professor Qian said, "The study has provided genomic resources for understanding how the deep-sea mussel has adapted to the abiotic stresses and lack of photosynthesis-derived food in the deep-sea chemosynthetic environment. The general mechanisms of symbiosis revealed in the study are of relevance to other symbiotic organisms such as deep-sea tubeworms and giant clams." Dr Qiu said, "The genomic resources will facilitate various studies, including genetic connectivity among deep-sea populations, which is relevant to the establishment of deep-sea marine reserves." The study was supported by the Strategic Priority Research Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences of China, HKUST, HKBU, Scientific and Technical Innovation Council of Shenzhen, and Guangdong Natural Science Foundation. Other main collaborators are HKUST post-doctoral fellows Dr Jin Sun and Dr Weipeng Zhang, Dr Jerome Hui of The Chinese University of Hong Kong and his team members Wenyan Nong and Fiona Ka Man Cheung, Dr Runsheng Li of Hong Kong Baptist University, Dr Yu Zhang of Shenzhen University, Dr Zhang Yang of The South China Sea Institute of Oceanography, and Christopher Fields of University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The paper is available online at: http://www.nature.com/articles/s41559-017-0121 A commentary by two independent researchers highlighting the results and significance of this and a related research paper is available at: http://www.nature.com/articles/s41559-017-0142. Those who have no access to this article may request HKBU or HKUST for a copy. Press release distributed by ResearchSEA for Hong Kong Baptist University.


News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

A joint research led by Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) and the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) has assembled the 1.64 gigabytes genome of a deep-sea mussel, which is roughly equivalent to 50% of the size of human genome. This is the first decoded genome among all deep-sea macrobenthic animals, revealing a complete set of DNA. The discovery gives wider insights into future research on the mechanisms of symbiosis in other marine organisms such as giant tubeworms and giant clams. The research team, led by HKUST's Chair Professor of Division of Life Science Professor Pei-Yuan Qian and HKBU's Associate Professor of Biology Dr Jian-Wen Qiu, has published the research findings in the international academic journal Nature Ecology & Evolution in early April. The team used a specimen collected in 2013 during Dr Qiu's participation in China's manned submersible Jiaolong's expedition of the South China Sea for the research. Deep-sea organisms including mussels thrive in the extreme environments of hydrothermal vents and cold seeps which are characterised by high hydrostatic pressure, lack of photosynthesis-derived food, variable temperatures and high concentrations of toxic substances. Despite their ability to survive under stressful conditions, a lack of genomic resources has hindered the understanding of their molecular mechanisms of adaptation. The study sequenced the genome of the deep-sea mussel Bathymodiolus platifrons as well as its shallow-water relative Modiolus philippinarum collected from a local softshore in Tingkok for comparison of genomic features. Through phylogenetic analysis, the research team discovered that modern deep-sea mussels are the descendants of shallow-water mussels, and their ancestors migrated to the deep sea approximately 110 million years ago, providing evidence to support a hypothesis that their ancestors survived through an extinction event during the global anoxia period associated with the Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum which occurred around 57 million years ago. Genome comparison revealed that the great expansion of several gene families in the deep-sea mussel may be related to its adaptation to the deep sea. For instance, the expansion of the "heat shock protein 70 family," a family of proteins that are produced by a cell in response to exposure to stressful conditions, may help the mussel stabilise protein structures. The expansion of the "ABC transporters family," the unit of the transport system, may enhance the mussel's ability to move toxic chemicals outside its gill epithelial cells. The expansion of gene families related to immune recognition, endocytosis and caspase-mediated apoptosis indicates the mussel's adaptation to the presence of chemoautotrophic endosymbionts in its gills. An additional proteomic analysis of the deep-sea mussel gill reveals nutritional and energetic dependency of the mussel on its methanotrophic symbionts. Professor Qian said, "The study has provided genomic resources for understanding how the deep-sea mussel has adapted to the abiotic stresses and lack of photosynthesis-derived food in the deep-sea chemosynthetic environment. The general mechanisms of symbiosis revealed in the study are of relevance to other symbiotic organisms such as deep-sea tubeworms and giant clams." Dr Qiu said, "The genomic resources will facilitate various studies, including genetic connectivity among deep-sea populations, which is relevant to the establishment of deep-sea marine reserves."


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: www.biosciencetechnology.com

A joint research led by Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) and the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) has assembled the 1.64 gigabytes genome of a deep-sea mussel, which is roughly equivalent to 50 percent of the size of human genome. This is the first decoded genome among all deep-sea macrobenthic animals, revealing a complete set of DNA. The discovery gives wider insights into future research on the mechanisms of symbiosis in other marine organisms such as giant tubeworms and giant clams. The research team, led by HKUST's Chair Professor of Division of Life Science Professor Pei-Yuan Qian and HKBU's Associate Professor of Biology Dr Jian-Wen Qiu, has published the research findings in prestigious international academic journal Nature Ecology & Evolution in early April. The team used a specimen collected in 2013 during Dr Qiu's participation in China's manned submersible Jiaolong's expedition of the South China Sea for the research. Deep-sea organisms including mussels thrive in the extreme environments of hydrothermal vents and cold seeps which are characterised by high hydrostatic pressure, lack of photosynthesis-derived food, variable temperatures and high concentrations of toxic substances. Despite their ability to survive under stressful conditions, a lack of genomic resources has hindered the understanding of their molecular mechanisms of adaptation. The study sequenced the genome of the deep-sea mussel Bathymodiolus platifrons as well as its shallow-water relative Modiolus philippinarum collected from a local softshore in Tingkok for comparison of genomic features. Through phylogenetic analysis, the research team discovered that modern deep-sea mussels are the descendants of shallow-water mussels, and their ancestors migrated to the deep sea approximately 110 million years ago, providing evidence to support a hypothesis that their ancestors survived through an extinction event during the global anoxia period associated with the Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum which occurred around 57 million years ago. Genome comparison revealed that the great expansion of several gene families in the deep-sea mussel may be related to its adaptation to the deep sea. For instance, the expansion of the "heat shock protein 70 family", a family of proteins that are produced by a cell in response to exposure to stressful conditions, may help the mussel stabilise protein structures. The expansion of the "ABC transporters family", the unit of the transport system, may enhance the mussel's ability to move toxic chemicals outside its gill epithelial cells. The expansion of gene families related to immune recognition, endocytosis and caspase-mediated apoptosis indicates the mussel's adaptation to the presence of chemoautotrophic endosymbionts in its gills. An additional proteomic analysis of the deep-sea mussel gill reveals nutritional and energetic dependency of the mussel on its methanotrophic symbionts. Professor Qian said, "The study has provided genomic resources for understanding how the deep-sea mussel has adapted to the abiotic stresses and lack of photosynthesis-derived food in the deep-sea chemosynthetic environment. The general mechanisms of symbiosis revealed in the study are of relevance to other symbiotic organisms such as deep-sea tubeworms and giant clams." Dr Qiu said, "The genomic resources will facilitate various studies, including genetic connectivity among deep-sea populations, which is relevant to the establishment of deep-sea marine reserves."


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: www.biosciencetechnology.com

A joint research led by Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) and the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) has assembled the 1.64 gigabytes genome of a deep-sea mussel, which is roughly equivalent to 50 percent of the size of human genome. This is the first decoded genome among all deep-sea macrobenthic animals, revealing a complete set of DNA. The discovery gives wider insights into future research on the mechanisms of symbiosis in other marine organisms such as giant tubeworms and giant clams. The research team, led by HKUST's Chair Professor of Division of Life Science Professor Pei-Yuan Qian and HKBU's Associate Professor of Biology Dr Jian-Wen Qiu, has published the research findings in prestigious international academic journal Nature Ecology & Evolution in early April. The team used a specimen collected in 2013 during Dr Qiu's participation in China's manned submersible Jiaolong's expedition of the South China Sea for the research. Deep-sea organisms including mussels thrive in the extreme environments of hydrothermal vents and cold seeps which are characterised by high hydrostatic pressure, lack of photosynthesis-derived food, variable temperatures and high concentrations of toxic substances. Despite their ability to survive under stressful conditions, a lack of genomic resources has hindered the understanding of their molecular mechanisms of adaptation. The study sequenced the genome of the deep-sea mussel Bathymodiolus platifrons as well as its shallow-water relative Modiolus philippinarum collected from a local softshore in Tingkok for comparison of genomic features. Through phylogenetic analysis, the research team discovered that modern deep-sea mussels are the descendants of shallow-water mussels, and their ancestors migrated to the deep sea approximately 110 million years ago, providing evidence to support a hypothesis that their ancestors survived through an extinction event during the global anoxia period associated with the Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum which occurred around 57 million years ago. Genome comparison revealed that the great expansion of several gene families in the deep-sea mussel may be related to its adaptation to the deep sea. For instance, the expansion of the "heat shock protein 70 family", a family of proteins that are produced by a cell in response to exposure to stressful conditions, may help the mussel stabilise protein structures. The expansion of the "ABC transporters family", the unit of the transport system, may enhance the mussel's ability to move toxic chemicals outside its gill epithelial cells. The expansion of gene families related to immune recognition, endocytosis and caspase-mediated apoptosis indicates the mussel's adaptation to the presence of chemoautotrophic endosymbionts in its gills. An additional proteomic analysis of the deep-sea mussel gill reveals nutritional and energetic dependency of the mussel on its methanotrophic symbionts. Professor Qian said, "The study has provided genomic resources for understanding how the deep-sea mussel has adapted to the abiotic stresses and lack of photosynthesis-derived food in the deep-sea chemosynthetic environment. The general mechanisms of symbiosis revealed in the study are of relevance to other symbiotic organisms such as deep-sea tubeworms and giant clams." Dr Qiu said, "The genomic resources will facilitate various studies, including genetic connectivity among deep-sea populations, which is relevant to the establishment of deep-sea marine reserves."


Quantum entanglement, one of the most intriguing features of multi-particle quantum system, has become a fundamental building block in both quantum information processing and quantum computation. If two particles are entangled, no matter how far away they are separated, quantum mechanics predicts that measurement of one particle leads to instantaneous wave-function collapse of the other particle. Such "spooky action at a distance" seems contradictory to our common belief and, in 1935, Einstein attempted to use entanglement to criticize quantum mechanics -- that the quantum description of physical reality is incomplete. Einstein believed that no information could travel faster than light, and suggested that there might be some local hidden variable theories that could explain the world in a deterministic way, if and only if they obey realism and locality. In 1964, J. S. Bell showed that the debate can be experimentally resolved by testing an inequality; by measuring correlations between entangled parties, the result calculated from local hidden variable theories should be constrained by the Bell inequality, which on the other hand can be violated in the prediction of quantum mechanics. Making use of a specifically-developed slow light technique to reduce the velocity of light dramatically, researchers at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology implemented a Bell Test and were able to generate frequency-bin entangled narrowband biphotons from spontaneous four-wave mixing (SFWM) in cold atoms with a double-path configuration, where the phase difference between the two spatial paths can be controlled independently and nonlocally. Their findings were published in the journal Optica on April 15, 2017 (doi: 10.1364/OPTICA.4.000388). "We tested the CHSH Bell inequality and registered |?|=2.52±0.48|S|=2.52±0.48, which violates the Bell inequality |?|?2," said Shengwang Du, professor of Physics at HKUST and the leader of the research team. "We have unambiguously demonstrated the generation of frequency-bin entangled narrowband (about 1 MHz) biphotons, which can efficiently interact with stationary atomic quantum nodes in an atom-photon quantum network. Because of their narrow bandwidth, these biphotons can be stored and retrieved from a quantum memory with high efficiency." "Our result, for the first time, tests the Bell inequality in a nonlocal temporal correlation of frequency-bin entangled narrowband biphotons with time-resolved detection," said Xianxin Guo, a co-author of the paper. "This will have applications in quantum information processing involving time-frequency entanglement." The study revealed the temporal details that agree well with theory calculation based on quantum mechanics, and implies the possibility of encoding and decoding qubit information in the time domain. "Our narrowband frequency-bin entangled biphoton source in this work can be ideally implemented to produce pure heralded single photons in a two-color qubit state with a tunable phase, making use of entanglement, linear optics, and time-resolved detection," said Guo.


Quantum entanglement, one of the most intriguing features of multi-particle quantum systems, has become a fundamental building block in both quantum information processing and quantum computation. If two particles are entangled, no matter how far away they are separated, quantum mechanics predicts that measurement of one particle leads to instantaneous wave-function collapse of the other particle. Such "spooky action at a distance" is non-intuitive, and in 1935, Einstein attempted to use entanglement to criticize quantum mechanics to suggest that the quantum description of physical reality is incomplete. Einstein believed that no information could travel faster than light, and suggested that there might be some local hidden variable theories that could explain the world in a deterministic way, if and only if they obey realism and locality. In 1964, J. S. Bell showed that the debate can be experimentally resolved by testing an inequality; by measuring correlations between entangled parties, the result calculated from local hidden variable theories should be constrained by the Bell inequality, which, on the other hand, can be violated in the predictions of quantum mechanics. By reducing the velocity of light dramatically, researchers at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology implemented a Bell Test and were able to generate frequency-bin entangled narrowband biphotons from spontaneous four-wave mixing (SFWM) in cold atoms with a double-path configuration, where the phase difference between the two spatial paths can be controlled independently and nonlocally. Their findings were published in the journal Optica on April 15, 2017. "We tested the CHSH Bell inequality and registered |S|=2.52±0.48|S|=2.52±0.48, which violates the Bell inequality |S|≤2," said Shengwang Du, professor of Physics at HKUST and the leader of the research team. "We have unambiguously demonstrated the generation of frequency-bin entangled narrowband (about 1 MHz) biphotons, which can efficiently interact with stationary atomic quantum nodes in an atom-photon quantum network. Because of their narrow bandwidth, these biphotons can be stored and retrieved from a quantum memory with high efficiency." "Our result, for the first time, tests the Bell inequality in a nonlocal temporal correlation of frequency-bin entangled narrowband biphotons with time-resolved detection," said Xianxin Guo, a co-author of the paper. "This will have applications in quantum information processing involving time-frequency entanglement." The study revealed temporal details that agree well with theory calculations based on quantum mechanics, and implies the possibility of encoding and decoding qubit information in the time domain. "Our narrowband frequency-bin entangled biphoton source in this work can be ideally implemented to produce pure heralded single photons in a two-color qubit state with a tunable phase, making use of entanglement, linear optics, and time-resolved detection," said Guo. More information: Xianxin Guo et al, Testing the Bell inequality on frequency-bin entangled photon pairs using time-resolved detection, Optica (2017). DOI: 10.1364/OPTICA.4.000388


GF Securities and HKUST Entrepreneurship Center Successfully Hosted a Joint Public Lecture during the "One Million Dollar Entrepreneurship Competition" GF Securities Co., Ltd. ("GF Securities" or "the Company"; HKSE: 1776; SZSE: 000776) and Hong Kong University of Science and Technology Entrepreneurship Center ("HKUST Entrepreneurship Center", and the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, "HKUST") jointly held a public lecture yesterday on campus, aiming to promote the "HKUST One Million Dollar Entrepreneurship Competition", and attracted numerous students and start-up-ers. Since 2011, the "One Million Dollar Entrepreneurship Competition" ("he Competition") has been held for six consecutive years, with divisions extending to Beijing, Guangzhou, Shenzhen, and Macau. Being the Platinum sponsor of the Hong Kong Division, GF Securities has fully participated and supported the event. In recent years, start-ups have sprung up all over the country. "The 7th HKUST Million Dollar International Entrepreneurship Competition" has attracted nearly 100 entries in Hong Kong division only, with total over 900 teams in all five divisions. As the Platinum sponsor, GF Securities, drawing from its professional expertise, gave a public lecture named "Startup Exit Strategy and a Brief Introduction to the Securities Market in China" for college students in Hong Kong. This will give young entrepreneurs a better understanding of capital markets and help equip them to manage successful start-ups. The public lecture was presented by Ms. Wang Chumei, Senior Vice President of GF Securities' Investment Banking Division. She made comparisons between the listing process in Hong Kong and China, capital withdrawal strategies for start-up companies and the mergers and acquisitions (M&A) process. The lecture helped college students gain a better business prospective, and enabled them to plan better for future start-ups. The lecture was successful and met with enthusiastic responses. Ms. Wang stayed after the lecture to answer all of the questions and enquiries raised by students. GF Securities is one of the first full-service investment banks in China. The Company was successfully listed on the main boards of the Shenzhen Stock Exchange and the Hong Kong Stock Exchange, in 2010 and 2015, respectively. It is fully licensed to provide comprehensive coverage across: investment banking, wealth management, trading and institutional client services, and investment management. Balanced development of each business line has helped GF Securities to achieve top rankings throughout capital markets in China. The Company is devoted to serving high quality SMEs and high net-worth clients throughout Asia. The investment banking division has a large reserve of SME clients which have become leading enterprises across various industries. GF Securities possesses valuable experience and professional expertise in singling out value creating start-ups for cultivation. Furthermore, the Company's holdings include GF Xinde Investment Management Corporation Limited, GF Qianhe investment Corporation Limited and GF Holdings (Hong Kong) Corporation Limited etc. These subsidiaries are experienced at navigating capital markets and focus on equity investment through SMEs. Being a major sponsor of the competition, jointly with HKUST, GF Securities, will provide invaluable knowledge for students, and help the youth to achieve their aspirations. Placing a lot of emphasis on "corporate citizenship", GF Securities, while seizing opportunities for continual development, has strictly adhered to promoting public welfare as they grow. In 2011, GF Securities Co., Ltd., GF Fund Management Co., Ltd., GF Futures Co., Ltd. and GF Xinde Investment Management Co., Ltd. jointly set up the "GF Securities Social Charity Foundation" ("the Foundation") which includes various social responsibility initiatives, of which the micro-entrepreneurship program is an essential part. From 2015 to 2016, the Foundation organized various activities, such as "Micro-entrepreneurial Action for College Students" and "Seeking Entrepreneurial Heroes" in China. The Foundation has contributed a total of RMB8 million in support of entrepreneurial endeavors. Mr. Lin Zhihai, President of GF Securities and Chairman of GF Securities Social Charity Foundation, said, "In recent years, business connections between Hong Kong and the Mainland have been increasingly closer. Meanwhile, the capital market in Hong Kong enjoys a high degree of internationalization, and attracts many investors and entrepreneurs worldwide every year, providing a good platform for start-ups. GF Securities, as a provider of comprehensive capital market services focuses on serving China's high-quality SMEs and affluent individuals, is willing to actively encourage the youth in Hong Kong to start businesses and cultivate outstanding entrepreneurs. In 2017, GF Securities will continue to implement the unity of social and economic benefits. While striving to create value for shareholders and customers, the Company will actively participate in social charity events, and increase efforts to alleviate poverty. GF Securities goal is to be an internationally competitive investment bank with a widely recognized global brand. ". About GF Securities Co. Ltd Established in 1991, GF Securities is one of the first, full-service investment banks in China. The Company was successfully listed on the main boards of the Shenzhen stock Exchange (Stock code: 000776.SZ), and the Hong Kong Stock Exchange (Stock code: 1776.HK), in 2010 and 2015, respectively. Relying on excellent business performance, risk management and quality services, the company achieves sustained and steady development, and is one of the most influential securities companies in China. The Company possesses industry-leading innovation capabilities and has built a diversified business portfolio serving various corporations, individuals, institutional investors, financial institutions and governments. As of December 31, 2016, the Company operates 264 brokerage branches, providing extensive national coverage to 31 provinces, cities, and autonomous regions throughout China. For two consecutive years in 2015 and 2016, GF Securities ranked second on "Hurun's Top Brands List" amongst Chinese securities companies. The Company is actively committed to social responsibility and caring, focusing on education and poverty through "GF Securities Social Charity Foundation", and as a result has enjoyed a strong reputation and an influential brand. L.R. Capital Announced its Pre-IPO Investment of RMB500 Million in Xinte Energy, a Subsidiary of TBEA


Huang C.,HKUST | Mok P.K.T.,HKUST
Digest of Technical Papers - IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference | Year: 2013

Multi-phase converters have become a topic of great interest due to the high output power capacity and output ripple cancellation effect. They are even more beneficial to nowadays high-frequency fully integrated converters with output capacitor integrated on-chip. As one of the dominant chip area consumers, reducing the size of the on-chip decoupling capacitors directly leads to cost down. It is reported that a 5× capacitor area reduction can be achieved with a four-phase converter compared to a single-phase one [1]. However, the penalty is obvious. Every extra phase comes with an inductor, which is also counted as cost and becomes more dominant with increase in the number of phases. © 2013 IEEE.

Loading HKUST collaborators
Loading HKUST collaborators