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News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: marketersmedia.com

Wiseguyreports.Com Adds “Interior Design -Market Demand, Growth, Opportunities and Analysis of Top Key Player Forecast To 2022” To Its Research Database The Global Interior Design Industry 2016 Market Research Report is a professional and in-depth study on the current state of the Interior Design industry. The report provides a basic overview of the industry including definitions, classifications, applications and industry chain structure. The Interior Design market analysis is provided for the international markets including development trends, competitive landscape analysis, and key regions development status. The report focuses on global major leading industry players providing information such as company profiles, product pictures and specifications, revenue cost, gross margin and contact information. Downstream demand analysis is also carried out. Finally the feasibility of new investment projects are assessed and overall research conclusions offered. With 228 tables and figures the report provides key statistics on the state of the industry and is a valuable source of guidance and direction for companies and individuals interested in the market. 1 Interior Design Industry Overview 1 1.1 Interior Design Definition 1 1.2 Interior Design Classification 2 1.3 Interior Design Application 2 1.4 Interior Design Market Overview 3 2 Environment Analysis of Interior Design 4 2.1 China Economic Environment Analysis 4 2.1.1 China GDP Analysis 4 2.1.2 China CPI Analysis 5 2.1.3 China Urban and Rural Incomes Analysis 6 2.1.4 China Total Retail Sales of Consumer Goods Analysis 7 2.1.5 China Investment in Fixed Assets Analysis 8 2.1.6 China The Total Value of Imports and Exports of Goods Analysis 9 2.1.7 2014 China Macroeconomic Forecast 9 2.2 European Economic Environmental Analysis 10 2.3 United States Economic Environmental Analysis 11 2.4 Japan Economic Environmental Analysis 12 2.5 Global Economic Environmental Analysis 13 8 Interior Design Main Players Analysis 72 8.1 Gensler 72 8.1.1 Company Profile 72 8.1.2 Design Picture and Design analysis 73 8.1.3 Revenue, Gross, Cost and Gross Margin 75 8.2 Gold Mantis 75 8.2.1 Company Profile 75 8.2.2 Design Picture 77 8.2.3 Revenue, Gross, Cost and Gross Margin 78 8.3 HOK 79 8.3.1 Company Profile 79 8.3.2 Design Picture and Design analysis 81 8.3.3 Revenue, Gross, Cost and Gross Margin 83 8.4 HBA 84 8.4.1 Company Profile 84 8.4.2 Design Picture and Design analysis 85 8.4.3 Revenue, Gross, Cost and Gross Margin 87 8.5 Perkins+WIll 88 8.5.1 Company Profile 88 8.5.2 Design Picture 89 8.5.3 Revenue, Gross, Cost and Gross Margin 90 8.6 Jacobs 91 8.6.1 Company Profile 91 8.6.2 Design Picture 92 8.6.3 Revenue, Gross, Cost and Gross Margin 93 8.7 Stantec 94 8.7.1 Company Profile 94 8.7.2 Design Picture and Design analysis 95 8.7.3 Revenue, Gross, Cost and Gross Margin 96 8.8 IA Interior Architects 97 8.8.1 Company Profile 97 8.8.2 Design Picture and Design analysis 98 8.8.3 Revenue, Gross, Cost and Gross Margin 100 8.9 Callison 102 8.9.1 Company Profile 102 8.9.2 Design Picture 103 8.9.3 Revenue, Gross, Cost and Gross Margin 104 8.10 Nelson 105 8.10.1 Company Profile 105 8.10.2 Design Picture and Design analysis 107 8.10.3 Revenue, Gross, Cost and Gross Margin 110 8.11 Leo A Daly 111 8.11.1 Company Profile 111 8.11.2 Design Picture and Design analysis 112 8.11.3 Revenue, Gross, Cost and Gross Margin 113 8.12 SOM 114 8.12.1 Company Profile 114 8.12.2 Design Picture and Design analysis 115 8.12.3 Revenue, Gross, Cost and Gross Margin 117 8.13 HKS 118 8.13.1 Company Profile 118 8.13.2 Design Picture and Design analysis 119 8.13.3 Revenue, Gross, Cost and Gross Margin 120 8.14 DB & B 121 8.14.1 Company Profile 121 8.14.2 Design Picture 122 8.14.3 Revenue, Gross, Cost and Gross Margin 123 8.15 Cannon Design 123 8.15.1 Company Profile 123 8.15.2 Design Picture 124 8.15.3 Revenue, Gross, Cost and Gross Margin 126 8.16 NBBJ 127 8.16.1 Company Profile 127 8.16.2 Design Picture and Design analysis 128 8.16.3 Revenue, Gross, Cost and Gross Margin 131 8.17 Perkins Eastman 131 8.17.1 Company Profile 131 8.17.2 Design Picture 132 8.17.3 Revenue, Gross, Cost and Gross Margin 134 8.18 CCD 135 8.18.1 Company Profile 135 8.18.2 Design Picture and Design analysis 136 8.18.3 Revenue, Gross, Cost and Gross Margin 137 8.19 AECOM Technology 138 8.19.1 Company Profile 138 8.19.2 Design Picture and Design analysis 139 8.19.3 Revenue, Gross, Cost and Gross Margin 140 8.20 Wilson Associates 141 8.20.1 Company Profile 141 For more information, please visit https://www.wiseguyreports.com/sample-request/323105-global-interior-design-industry-2016-market-research-report


Miller M.J.,Capability Modeling LLC | Shahi N.,View Medical | Dias A.N.,HKS Inc.
Proceedings - Winter Simulation Conference | Year: 2011

Effective simulation models require robust development methodologies. Planning, design, data, and testing are integral to ensure valuable answers to the model's customers. This paper discusses how supporting static models provide guidelines and directional correctness to simulation models. Static models can also provide supplemental answers which allow the reduction in simulation model complexity. © 2011 IEEE.


Pati D.,HKS Inc. | Rashid M.,HKS Inc. | Zimring C.,HKS Inc.
Journal of Architectural and Planning Research | Year: 2010

In a previous study, the authors attempted to identify the underlying dimensions of openness in federal courthouse architecture. The study was significant because openness became a key political ideology to be expressed in federal architecture in the late 20th century, and considerations arising from radical changes in security scenarios were perceived as conflicting with the desire for openness. Using an expressive lens, the previous study focused on identifying clients' interpretations of the concept. Findings of the study suggested that openness has six underlying interpretations - accessibility, transparency, exposure, organizational clarity, illumination, and inclusiveness. The authors also suggested a four-dimensional theoretical framework - physical, social, cognitive, and symbolic - within which the six interpretations are situated. Using a behavioral lens, this paper reports the findings of a follow-up study that focused on the building occupants' responses to clients' interpretations, representing a key conduit between clients' intentions and public response. During 2004-2005, 110 courthouse occupants from three federal courthouses completed a questionnaire survey. Data suggest that occupants conceive openness mainly in terms of transparency and exposure. Further, statistical analyses suggest that openness may be a two-dimensional construct from the occupants' viewpoint, in contrast to the four-dimensional framework hypothesized previously. Findings highlight subsets of interpretations that constitute occupants' perceptions of openness, articulating an important schema in the link between clients' intentions and public perception. The study creates the necessary foundation for a deeper understanding of and solutions to the security-openness conflict. © 2010, Locke Science Publishing Company, Inc.


Pati D.,Texas Tech University | Harvey T.E.,HKS Inc | Redden P.,University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center | Summers B.,University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center | Pati S.,Center for Advanced Design Research and Evaluation
Health Environments Research and Design Journal | Year: 2015

Objective: The objective of the study was to examine the impact of decentralization on operational efficiency, staff well-being, and teamwork on three inpatient units. Background: Decentralized unit operations and the corresponding physical design solution were hypothesized to positively affect several concerns-productive use of nursing time, staff stress, walking distances, and teamwork, among others. With a wide adoption of the concept, empirical evidence on the impact of decentralization was warranted. Methods: A multimethod, before-and-after, quasi-experimental design was adopted for the study, focusing on five issues, namely, (1) how nurses spend their time, (2) walking distance, (3) acute stress, (4) productivity, and (5) teamwork. Data on all five issues were collected on three older units with centralized operational model (before move). The same set of data, with identical tools and measures, were collected on the same units after move in to new physical units with decentralized operational model. Data were collected during spring and fall of 2011. Results: Documentation, nurse station use, medication room use, and supplies room use showed consistent change across the three units. Walking distance increased (statistically significant) on two of the three units. Self-reported level of collaboration decreased, although assessment of the physical facility for collaboration increased. Conclusions: Decentralized nursing and physical design models potentially result in quality of work improvements associated with documentation, medication, and supplies. However, there are unexpected consequences associated with walking, and staff collaboration and teamwork. The solution to the unexpected consequences may lie in operational interventions and greater emphasis on culture change. © The Author(s) 2015 .


Evans J.,HKS Inc | Reyers E.,Nursing Institute for Healthcare Design
Critical Care Nursing Quarterly | Year: 2014

The Patient Room is one of the most important and costly rooms in the design of an inpatient bed unit. As a result, the patient room mock-up requires knowledge of the components that inform the patient room environment. This article provides the intensive care nurse with questions about patient care processes and unit policies that should be considered in a mock-up. The mock-up outcome should align with the projectÊs goals and objectives of the health care system, infuse the principles of evidence-based design, and ensure that the design accommodates the best workflow for the patient population that will be served. The template will serve as a guide to evaluate the various features of the patient room and for the mock-up discussion between the nurse and the architect. © 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.


Pati D.,Texas Tech University | Pati S.,Cadre Inc | Harvey T.E.,HKS Inc.
Health Environments Research and Design Journal | Year: 2016

Background: Security, a subset of safety, is equally important in the efficient delivery of patient care. The emergency department (ED) is susceptible to violence creating concerns for the safety and security of patients, staff, and visitors and for the safe and efficient delivery of care. Although there is an implicit and growing recognition of the role of the physical environment, interventions typically have been at the microlevel. Objective: The objective of this study was to identify physical design attributes that potentially influence safety and efficiency of ED operations. Method: An exploratory, qualitative research design was adopted to examine the efficiency and safety correlates of ED physical design attributes. The study comprised a multimeasure approach involving multidisciplinary gaming, semistructured interviews, and touring interviews of frontline staff in four EDs at three hospital systems across three states. Results: Five macro physical design attributes (issues that need to be addressed at the design stage and expensive to rectify once built) emerged from the data as factors substantially associated with security issues. They are design issues pertaining to (a) the entry zone, (b) traffic management, (c) patient room clustering, (d) centralization versus decentralization, and (e) provisions for special populations. Conclusion: Data from this study suggest that ED security concerns are generally associated with three sources: (a) gang-related violence, (b) dissatisfied patients, and (c) behavioral health patients. Study data show that physical design has an important role in addressing the above-mentioned concerns. Implications for ED design are outlined in the article. © 2016, © The Author(s) 2016.


Tsao C.C.Y.,Lean Construction Institute | Beikmann B.,HKS Inc.
IGLC 2012 - 20th Conference of the International Group for Lean Construction | Year: 2012

Architecture-Engineering-Construction (AEC) project development is complex when the work of many design and construction specialists is tightly coupled. Since it is inefficient for these specialists to be individually responsible for obtaining the input they need from others, project team leaders often rely on coordination meetings to facilitate the exchange of requests and information between specialists. Such coordination meetings are critical to lean projects because they provide a framework for clarifying and prioritizing stakeholder values, design and construction objectives, and constraints to design and construction work. To help the AEC industry improve its management of coordination meetings, we describe 12 meeting facilitation techniques used to improve coordination of design development on a current hospital project. These techniques enable project team leaders to view and manage coordination meetings as production systems and thus learn how to better manage the decision making process required for design development. We want this paper to inspire others to share their facilitation techniques and begin investigating their effectiveness to improve efforts in coordinating the coordination meetings.


Patent
Hks Co. | Date: 2013-10-30

In a air compressing device of an engine, a supercharger interposed in an EGR pipe diverging from a portion of an exhaust pipe of the engine on the downstream side of a turbine of a turbocharger, pressurizing an EGR gas introduced into an EGR pipe by a compressor driven by rotation of the engine and supplying the pressurized EGR gas to an intake manifold of the engine, and control structure for adjusting an opening of a throttle valve arranged in a portion of the EGR pipe on the downstream side of the compressor of the supercharger and controlling a supply amount of the EGR gas supplied from the compressor to the intake manifold.


PubMed | Texas Tech University, HKS Inc. and Cadre Inc
Type: Journal Article | Journal: HERD | Year: 2016

Security, a subset of safety, is equally important in the efficient delivery of patient care. The emergency department (ED) is susceptible to violence creating concerns for the safety and security of patients, staff, and visitors and for the safe and efficient delivery of care. Although there is an implicit and growing recognition of the role of the physical environment, interventions typically have been at the microlevel.The objective of this study was to identify physical design attributes that potentially influence safety and efficiency of ED operations.An exploratory, qualitative research design was adopted to examine the efficiency and safety correlates of ED physical design attributes. The study comprised a multimeasure approach involving multidisciplinary gaming, semistructured interviews, and touring interviews of frontline staff in four EDs at three hospital systems across three states.Five macro physical design attributes (issues that need to be addressed at the design stage and expensive to rectify once built) emerged from the data as factors substantially associated with security issues. They are design issues pertaining to (a) the entry zone, (b) traffic management, (c) patient room clustering, (d) centralization versus decentralization, and (e) provisions for special populations.Data from this study suggest that ED security concerns are generally associated with three sources: (a) gang-related violence, (b) dissatisfied patients, and (c) behavioral health patients. Study data show that physical design has an important role in addressing the above-mentioned concerns. Implications for ED design are outlined in the article.


PubMed | Texas Tech University, Center for Advanced Design Research & Evaluation, HKS Inc. and University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: HERD | Year: 2015

The objective of the study was to examine the impact of decentralization on operational efficiency, staff well-being, and teamwork on three inpatient units.Decentralized unit operations and the corresponding physical design solution were hypothesized to positively affect several concerns-productive use of nursing time, staff stress, walking distances, and teamwork, among others. With a wide adoption of the concept, empirical evidence on the impact of decentralization was warranted.A multimethod, before-and-after, quasi-experimental design was adopted for the study, focusing on five issues, namely, (1) how nurses spend their time, (2) walking distance, (3) acute stress, (4) productivity, and (5) teamwork. Data on all five issues were collected on three older units with centralized operational model (before move). The same set of data, with identical tools and measures, were collected on the same units after move in to new physical units with decentralized operational model. Data were collected during spring and fall of 2011.Documentation, nurse station use, medication room use, and supplies room use showed consistent change across the three units. Walking distance increased (statistically significant) on two of the three units. Self-reported level of collaboration decreased, although assessment of the physical facility for collaboration increased.Decentralized nursing and physical design models potentially result in quality of work improvements associated with documentation, medication, and supplies. However, there are unexpected consequences associated with walking, and staff collaboration and teamwork. The solution to the unexpected consequences may lie in operational interventions and greater emphasis on culture change.

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