HIV and Hepatitis Research Group

Aachen, Germany

HIV and Hepatitis Research Group

Aachen, Germany
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Wiesmann F.,HIV and Hepatitis Research Group | Vachta J.,HIV and Hepatitis Research Group | Ehret R.,HIV and Hepatitis Research Group | Walter H.,Friedrich - Alexander - University, Erlangen - Nuremberg | And 8 more authors.
AIDS Research and Therapy | Year: 2011

Background: Although being considered as a rarely observed HIV-1 protease mutation in clinical isolates, the L76V-prevalence increased 1998-2008 in some European countries most likely due to the approval of Lopinavir, Amprenavir and Darunavir which can select L76V. Beside an enhancement of resistance, L76V is also discussed to confer hypersusceptibility to the drugs Atazanavir and Saquinavir which might enable new treatment strategies by trying to take advantage of particular mutations.Results: Based on a cohort of 47 L76V-positive patients, we examined if there might exist a clinical advantage for L76V-positive patients concerning long-term success of PI-containing regimens in patients with limited therapy options.Genotypic- and phenotypic HIV-resistance tests from 47 mostly multi-resistant, L76V-positive patients throughout Germany were accomplished retrospectively 1999-2009. Five genotype-based drug-susceptibility predictions received from online interpretation-tools for Atazanavir, Saquinavir, Amprenavir and Lopinavir, were compared to phenotype-based predictions that were determined by using a recombinant virus assay along with a Virtual Phenotype™(Virco). The clinical outcome of the L76V-adapted follow-up therapy was determined by monitoring viral load for 96 weeks.Conclusions: In this analysis, the mostly used interpretation systems overestimated the L76V-mutation concerning Atazanavir- and SQV resistance. In fact, a clear benefit in drug susceptibility for these drugs was observed in phenotype analysis after establishment of L76V. More importantly, long-term therapy success was significantly higher in patients receiving Atazanavir and/or Saquinavir plus one L76V-selecting drug compared to patients without L76V-selecting agents (p = 0.002).In case of L76V-occurrence ATV and/or SQV may represent encouraging options for patients in deep salvage situations. © 2011 Wiesmann et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Wiesmann F.,HIV and Hepatitis Research Group | Naeth G.,HIV and Hepatitis Research Group | Sarrazin C.,Goethe University Frankfurt | Berger A.,Goethe University Frankfurt | And 4 more authors.
Medical Microbiology and Immunology | Year: 2015

In the range of clinical decision points for response-guided therapy of HCV, there is still insufficient data concerning the conformity of quantification results obtained by different assays and their correlation with the HPS/CTM v2 assay which was used for initial clinical studies. In a head-to-head comparison, assay accuracy and detection rates of six quantitative assays [artus HCV QS-RGQ, COBAS Ampliprep/COBAS TaqMan HCV v1/v2, High Pure System/COBAS TaqMan (HPS), RealTime HCV, and Versant HCV1.0] were assessed by measuring WHO and PEI standards at dilution steps near clinical decision points. Detection rates and mean differences between assays were evaluated by analyzing twenty clinical samples at 10, 100, and 1,000 IU/mL. Ten replicates from specimens with different HCV genotypes were used to analyze pan-genotypic intra-assay variation. At ≤25 IU/mL, RealTime demonstrated the highest detection rates. With 0.1 log difference when testing clinical samples, results obtained from the Versant and RealTime assays matched best with results from HPS. Mean difference analysis across all assay results revealed wide differences between 0.01 and 0.75 log IU/mL. RealTime showed the lowest intra-assay variation across genotypes 1–4 (25, 100, 1,000 IU/mL). There are substantial analytical differences between viral load assays clinicians should be aware of. These variations may have impact on clinical decisions for patients on HCV triple therapy and may argue for assay-specific decision points equivalent to reference values established in studies using HPS. A comparison of quantification is recommended prior to a switch of assays during ongoing therapy. © 2014, The Author(s).


Naeth G.,HIV and Hepatitis Research Group | Ehret R.,HIV and Hepatitis Research Group | Wiesmann F.,HIV and Hepatitis Research Group | Braun P.,HIV and Hepatitis Research Group | And 2 more authors.
Medical Microbiology and Immunology | Year: 2013

The goal of antiretroviral therapy is reduction in morbidity and mortality via suppression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) viral load (VL) to undetectable levels. VL assay sensitivity has improved over time, but the reproducibility and clinical importance of VL results marginally higher than the limit of detection (LoD) are uncertain. We assessed the reproducibility and concordance of low VL results obtained with the Roche Cobas AmpliPrep/Cobas TaqMan HIV-1 version 2.0 (CAP-CTM) and the Abbott RealTime (m2000) HIV-1 assays, using longitudinal specimens from HIV-1-infected patients with low VL (<300 copies/ml) and stable CD4+ cell counts. Based on replicate testing of 3 specimens, coefficients of variation for log-transformed VL results were 5-8 % for m2000 and 9-10 % for CAP-CTM. The concordance between assays in specimens from patients with previously undetectable, detectable but not quantifiable VL, or variable (undetectable/detectable but not quantifiable VL) results over time was 90, 56, and 56 %, respectively. Correlation between results for specimens with quantifiable VL (initially 40-300 copies/ml) was moderate (R 2 = 0.48) with significantly higher results for CAP-CTM and a mean difference (CAP-CTM minus m2000) of 0.10 log10 copies/ml. T-cell activation (CD8+/CD38+ percentage) in patients with low VL was initially higher than in patients with undetectable VL, and then decreased to equivalent levels over time. These results indicate that residual viremia at levels slightly above the LoD have no negative effect on T-cell activation. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.


PubMed | HIV and Hepatitis Research Group
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: Medical microbiology and immunology | Year: 2015

In the range of clinical decision points for response-guided therapy of HCV, there is still insufficient data concerning the conformity of quantification results obtained by different assays and their correlation with the HPS/CTM v2 assay which was used for initial clinical studies. In a head-to-head comparison, assay accuracy and detection rates of six quantitative assays [artus HCV QS-RGQ, COBAS Ampliprep/COBAS TaqMan HCV v1/v2, High Pure System/COBAS TaqMan (HPS), RealTime HCV, and Versant HCV1.0] were assessed by measuring WHO and PEI standards at dilution steps near clinical decision points. Detection rates and mean differences between assays were evaluated by analyzing twenty clinical samples at 10, 100, and 1,000 IU/mL. Ten replicates from specimens with different HCV genotypes were used to analyze pan-genotypic intra-assay variation. At 25 IU/mL, RealTime demonstrated the highest detection rates. With 0.1 log difference when testing clinical samples, results obtained from the Versant and RealTime assays matched best with results from HPS. Mean difference analysis across all assay results revealed wide differences between 0.01 and 0.75 log IU/mL. RealTime showed the lowest intra-assay variation across genotypes 1-4 (25, 100, 1,000 IU/mL). There are substantial analytical differences between viral load assays clinicians should be aware of. These variations may have impact on clinical decisions for patients on HCV triple therapy and may argue for assay-specific decision points equivalent to reference values established in studies using HPS. A comparison of quantification is recommended prior to a switch of assays during ongoing therapy.


PubMed | HIV and Hepatitis Research Group
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: Medical microbiology and immunology | Year: 2013

The goal of antiretroviral therapy is reduction in morbidity and mortality via suppression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) viral load (VL) to undetectable levels. VL assay sensitivity has improved over time, but the reproducibility and clinical importance of VL results marginally higher than the limit of detection (LoD) are uncertain. We assessed the reproducibility and concordance of low VL results obtained with the Roche Cobas AmpliPrep/Cobas TaqMan HIV-1 version 2.0 (CAP-CTM) and the Abbott RealTime (m2000) HIV-1 assays, using longitudinal specimens from HIV-1-infected patients with low VL (<300copies/ml) and stable CD4+ cell counts. Based on replicate testing of 3 specimens, coefficients of variation for log-transformed VL results were 5-8% for m2000 and 9-10% for CAP-CTM. The concordance between assays in specimens from patients with previously undetectable, detectable but not quantifiable VL, or variable (undetectable/detectable but not quantifiable VL) results over time was 90, 56, and 56%, respectively. Correlation between results for specimens with quantifiable VL (initially 40-300copies/ml) was moderate (R (2)=0.48) with significantly higher results for CAP-CTM and a mean difference (CAP-CTM minus m2000) of 0.10 log(10)copies/ml. T-cell activation (CD8+/CD38+ percentage) in patients with low VL was initially higher than in patients with undetectable VL, and then decreased to equivalent levels over time. These results indicate that residual viremia at levels slightly above the LoD have no negative effect on T-cell activation.

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