Hitachi High Technologies America Inc.

Pleasanton, CA, United States

Hitachi High Technologies America Inc.

Pleasanton, CA, United States
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Patent
Hitachi High Technologies America Inc. | Date: 2017-04-14

An interactive laboratory robotic system is described that includes devices for use in a laboratory including a robotic assistant that can perform tasks and that can be controlled and configured by humans. The robot may assist personnel in performing repetitive tasks within a laboratory, and capture and store transactional and analytical data, such as during a DNA sequencing process. The robot may include sensors and/or cameras to detect, recognize, and track objects in an environment, and a manipulable arm having a hand for grasping objects. Other components of the system may include a sample tray graspable by the robot; a tray carriage for holding sample trays within equipment; an interactive shelf for holding sample trays; a mobile cart for mating with and charging the robot; and an accessory unit to enable the robot to open doors of equipment. The system may help to reduce or eliminate mistakes by personnel.


Grand Forks, North Dakota, Sept. 19, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), a worldwide leader in the development of solutions to energy and environmental challenges, announced it is working with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and Hitachi High Technologies America, Inc., to improve assessment methods for estimating the storage capacity of carbon dioxide (CO ) in tight shale formations, such as the Bakken. The project is funded by NETL with cost share provided by Hitachi. “Although significant progress has been made globally to investigate the suitability of subsurface geologic sinks for CO storage, there is a lack of detailed geologic and petrophysical data needed to develop better techniques for assessing CO storage resources within unconventional formations,” said Bethany Kurz, EERC Principal Hydrogeologist, Laboratory Analysis Group Lead. EERC researchers will develop advanced analytical techniques to better understand and quantify the distribution of clay minerals, organics, pore networks, and fractures in representative shale and tight rock samples. The analytical methods will be developed using imagery collected from a field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), which provides the high-resolution images necessary for detection and characterization of the formation. Project participant and cosponsor Hitachi High Technologies America, Inc., will work alongside the EERC to improve the data processing and image analysis within the FESEM software. “We are so pleased to be working with Hitachi on this project,” continued Kurz. “One of the key challenges in estimating CO storage capacity in organic-rich shale is that the analytical equipment and methods used to evaluate conventional reservoirs are limited when applied to shales that require analysis at such a small scale. Hitatchi’s technology and image analysis expertise will greatly improve our ability to efficiently identify and quantify key features of interest within the shales and other tight rocks.” “Working with the EERC offers an exciting opportunity to utilize and develop Hitachi electron imaging technologies for the advanced characterization of unconventional reservoirs,” said Chad Ostrander, VP/GM of Hitachi High-Technologies Canada, Inc. “The potential technology improvements offer both environmental and economic benefits on a global scale, and Hitachi is pleased to be part of this initiative.” The effects of CO exposure on shale samples will also be analyzed by scientists at NETL’s CT Scanning Lab in Morgantown, West Virginia. NETL staff will also be involved to ensure that the project supports the goals of the Carbon Storage Program, which aims to improve the ability to predict CO storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30%. The EERC is a world leader in developing cleaner, more efficient energy and environmental technologies to protect and clean our air, water, and soil. The EERC, a high-tech, nonprofit division of the University of North Dakota, operates like a business and pursues an entrepreneurial, market-driven approach in order to successfully demonstrate and commercialize innovative technologies. Since 1987, the EERC has had over 1340 clients in 52 countries. Hitachi High Technologies America, Inc. ("HTA") is a privately-owned global affiliate company that operates within the Hitachi Group Companies. HTA sells and services semiconductor manufacturing equipment, analytical instrumentation, scientific instruments, and bio-related products as well as industrial equipment, electronic devices, and electronic and industrial materials.


Zhu C.,Washington University in St. Louis | Zhu C.,Nanjing Southeast University | Zhu C.,Georgia Institute of Technology | Zeng J.,Washington University in St. Louis | And 8 more authors.
Journal of the American Chemical Society | Year: 2012

This article describes a systematic study of the nucleation and growth of Ag (and Au) on Pd nanocrystal seeds. By carefully controlling the reaction kinetics, the newly formed Ag atoms could be directed to selectively nucleate and then epitaxially grow on a specific number (ranging from one to six) of the six faces on a cubic Pd seed, leading to the formation of bimetallic nanocrystals with a variety of different structures. In addition to changing the injection rate of precursor, we also systematically investigated other reaction parameters including the capping agent, reductant, and reaction temperature. Our results suggest that the site-selective growth of Ag on cubic Pd seeds could be readily realized by optimizing these reaction parameters. On the basis of the positions of Pd seeds inside the bimetallic nanocrystals as revealed by TEM imaging and elemental mapping, we could identify the exact growth pathways and achieve a clear and thorough understanding of the mechanisms. We have successfully applied the same strategy based on kinetic control to cubic Pd seeds with different sizes and octahedral Pd seeds of one size to generate an array of novel bimetallic nanocrystals with well-controlled structures. With cubic Pd seeds as an example, we have also extended this strategy to the Pd-Au system. We believe this work will provide a promising route to the fabrication of bimetallic nanocrystals with novel structures and properties for applications in plasmonics, catalysis, and other areas. © 2012 American Chemical Society.


Grand Forks, North Dakota, Sept. 19, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), a worldwide leader in the development of solutions to energy and environmental challenges, announced it is working with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and Hitachi High Technologies America, Inc., to improve assessment methods for estimating the storage capacity of carbon dioxide (CO ) in tight shale formations, such as the Bakken. The project is funded by NETL with cost share provided by Hitachi. “Although significant progress has been made globally to investigate the suitability of subsurface geologic sinks for CO storage, there is a lack of detailed geologic and petrophysical data needed to develop better techniques for assessing CO storage resources within unconventional formations,” said Bethany Kurz, EERC Principal Hydrogeologist, Laboratory Analysis Group Lead. EERC researchers will develop advanced analytical techniques to better understand and quantify the distribution of clay minerals, organics, pore networks, and fractures in representative shale and tight rock samples. The analytical methods will be developed using imagery collected from a field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), which provides the high-resolution images necessary for detection and characterization of the formation. Project participant and cosponsor Hitachi High Technologies America, Inc., will work alongside the EERC to improve the data processing and image analysis within the FESEM software. “We are so pleased to be working with Hitachi on this project,” continued Kurz. “One of the key challenges in estimating CO storage capacity in organic-rich shale is that the analytical equipment and methods used to evaluate conventional reservoirs are limited when applied to shales that require analysis at such a small scale. Hitatchi’s technology and image analysis expertise will greatly improve our ability to efficiently identify and quantify key features of interest within the shales and other tight rocks.” “Working with the EERC offers an exciting opportunity to utilize and develop Hitachi electron imaging technologies for the advanced characterization of unconventional reservoirs,” said Chad Ostrander, VP/GM of Hitachi High-Technologies Canada, Inc. “The potential technology improvements offer both environmental and economic benefits on a global scale, and Hitachi is pleased to be part of this initiative.” The effects of CO exposure on shale samples will also be analyzed by scientists at NETL’s CT Scanning Lab in Morgantown, West Virginia. NETL staff will also be involved to ensure that the project supports the goals of the Carbon Storage Program, which aims to improve the ability to predict CO storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30%. The EERC is a world leader in developing cleaner, more efficient energy and environmental technologies to protect and clean our air, water, and soil. The EERC, a high-tech, nonprofit division of the University of North Dakota, operates like a business and pursues an entrepreneurial, market-driven approach in order to successfully demonstrate and commercialize innovative technologies. Since 1987, the EERC has had over 1340 clients in 52 countries. Hitachi High Technologies America, Inc. ("HTA") is a privately-owned global affiliate company that operates within the Hitachi Group Companies. HTA sells and services semiconductor manufacturing equipment, analytical instrumentation, scientific instruments, and bio-related products as well as industrial equipment, electronic devices, and electronic and industrial materials.


Alegria L.D.,Princeton University | Ji H.,Princeton University | Yao N.,Princeton University | Clarke J.J.,Hitachi High Technologies America Inc. | And 2 more authors.
Applied Physics Letters | Year: 2014

We demonstrate the van der Waals epitaxy of the topological insulator compound Bi2Te3 on the ferromagnetic insulator Cr 2Ge2Te6. The layers are oriented with (001)Bi2Te3||(001)Cr2Ge2Te 6 and (110)Bi2Te3||(100)Cr2Ge 2Te6. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy indicates the formation of a sharp interface. At low temperatures, bilayers consisting of Bi2Te3 on Cr2Ge 2Te6 exhibit a large anomalous Hall effect (AHE). Tilted field studies of the AHE indicate that the easy axis lies along the c-axis of the heterostructure, consistent with magnetization measurements in bulk Cr 2Ge2Te6. The 61 K Curie temperature of Cr 2Ge2Te6 and the use of near-stoichiometric materials may lead to the development of spintronic devices based on the AHE. © 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.


Wang C.,Nanostructure Laboratory | Murphy P.F.,Nanostructure Laboratory | Yao N.,Princeton University | McIlwrath K.,Hitachi High Technologies America Inc. | Chou S.Y.,Nanostructure Laboratory
Nano Letters | Year: 2011

We report a new approach, termed "growth by nanopatterned host-medicated catalyst" (NHC growth), to solve nonuniformities of Si nanowires (NWs) grown on amorphous substrates. Rather than pure metal catalyst, the NHC uses a mixture of metal catalyst with the material to be grown (i.e., Si), nanopatterns them into desired locations and anneals them. The Si host ensures one catalyst-dot per-growth-site, prevents catalyst-dot break-up, and crystallizes catalyst-dot (hence orientating NWs). The growth results straight silicon NWs on SiO 2 with uniform length and diameter (4% deviation), predetermined locations, preferred orientation, one-wire per-growth-site, and high density; all are 10-100 times better than conventional growth. © 2011 American Chemical Society.


Gordon R.,Hitachi High Technologies America Inc.
Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering | Year: 2013

In this presentation, Hitachi High Technologies America (HTA) introduces its Educational Outreach Program and explains it's involvement with Change The Equation (CTEq), a nonprofit, nonpartisan, CEO-led initiative that is mobilizing the business community to improve the quality of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) learning in the United States. © 2013 SPIE.


Suzuki M.,Hitachi High-Technologies | Yaguchi T.,Hitachi High-Technologies | Zhang X.F.,Hitachi High Technologies America Inc.
Journal of Electron Microscopy | Year: 2013

Quantitative modeling for high-resolution (phase contrast) gas cell environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) imaging is presented in this paper. Concepts of pre-specimen scattering object (PreSO) and post-specimen scattering object (PoSO) are introduced to explain electron scattering caused by gas and window membranes associated with the gas environmental cell (E-cell). PreSO preserves the structural phase information and the effect can be evaluated by averaging the contrast transfer functions (CTFs) over random electron scattering. PoSO is treated as information loss and the unscattered electrons play a major role in determining the ETEM image quality. The theoretical model is compared and matched well with our systematic gas ETEM experimental results under various gas pressures. Extension of our approach to the aberration-corrected ETEM is discussed. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press [on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy]. All rights reserved.


Trademark
Hitachi High Technologies America Inc. | Date: 2016-05-02

Electric or electronic sensor systems for collection of data concerning chemical and physical environmental conditions of commercial and industrial facilities and equipment used to store or transport perishable goods, consisting of electric or electronic sensors, electronic data relays for sensors, computer software and hardware for use in network management, network routers, and telecommunications and data networking hardware, namely, devices for transporting and aggregating data across multiple network infrastructures. Providing storage, monitoring, and analysis of digital data concerning chemical and physical environmental conditions of commercial and industrial facilities and equipment used to store or transport perishable goods, collected from electric or electronic sensor systems.


Trademark
Hitachi High Technologies America Inc. | Date: 2014-09-26

Electric or electronic sensor systems for collection of data concerning chemical and physical environmental conditions consisting of electric or electronic sensors, electronic data relays for sensors, computer software and hardware for use in network management, network routers, and telecommunications and data networking hardware, namely, devices for transporting and aggregating data across multiple network infrastructures. Providing storage, monitoring, and analysis of digital data concerning chemical and physical environmental conditions collected from electric or electronic sensor systems.

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