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Marina di Ragusa, Italy

Nicolini A.,Respiratory Diseases Unit | Cardini F.,Respiratory Diseases Unit | Landucci N.,Respiratory Diseases Unit | Lanata S.,Histopathology Unit | Barlascini C.,Forensic Medicine
BMC Pulmonary Medicine | Year: 2013

Background: High-frequency airway clearance (HFCWC) assist devices generate either positive or negative trans-respiratory pressure excursions to produce high-frequency, small-volume oscillations in the airways.HFCWC can lead to changes in volume of 15-57 ml and in flow up to 1.6 L/s, which generate minimal coughing to mobilize secretions. The typical treatment lasts 20-30 minutes, and consists of short periods of compression at different frequencies, separated by coughing.The aim of this study was to find the more efficacious treatment in patients with bronchiectasis: traditional techniques of chest physiotherapy (CPT) versus high frequency oscillation of the chest wall in patients with bronchiectasis.Methods: 37 patients were enrolled. Seven of them were excluded. Computer randomization divided the patients into three groups:. - 10 patients treated with HFCWO by using the Vest® Airway Clearance System;- 10 patients treated with traditional techniques of air way clearance (PEP bottle, PEP mask, ELTGOL, vibratory positive expiratory pressure);. - 10 patients received medical therapy only (control group).To be eligible for enrollment, participants had to be between 18 and 85 years old and have a diagnosis of bronchiectasis, confirmed on high resolution computed tomography. Exclusion criteria: lack of informed consent, signs of exacerbation, cystic fibrosis. Before the treatment, each patient had blood tests, sputum volume and cell count, pulmonary function tests and on the quality of life inventories (MMRC, CAT, BCSS). The results were processed through the covariance analysis, performed with the R-Project statistical program. It has been considered a positive result p <005.Results: Both treatments (traditional CPT and HFCWO) showed a significant improvement in some biochemical and functional respiratory tests as well as in the quality of life compared to the control group. The use of HFCWO compared to CPT also produced a significant improvement in blood inflammation parameter C-RP (p ≤0.019), parameters of lung functionality associated with bronchial obstruction (FVC, FEV1) (p ≤0.006 and p ≤0.001), and in the dyspnea. Improvement in quality of life scales was noted. (BCSS, CAT) (both p ≤0.001). No significant changes of total cell counts in sputum samples were observed in the two groups. In the HFCWO group a significant reduction of neutrophils percentage (p≤0.002) and a significant increase of macrophages percentage (p ≤0.012).Conclusions: The HFCWO technique provides an improvement both in pulmonary function and quality of life related parameters in patients with chronic hypersecretive disease. Since those patients need daily airway clearance, this treatment should be included among the principal options in chest physiotherapy. The study was registered as ChiCTR-TRC-12002134 at http://www.chictr.org. © 2013 Nicolini et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. Source


Badmos K.B.,Histopathology Unit
African health sciences | Year: 2012

Isolated tuberculous epididymo-orchitis may closely mimic testicular tumour particularly in patients with no history of systemic TB thereby presenting a diagnostic and treatment challenges. A 44-year old man presented with 4 months history of left scrotal mass and had left orchidectomy following a presumptive diagnosis of testicular tumour. Histopathological diagnosis of testicular tuberculosis was subsequently made. Although the patient was thereafter referred for antituberculosis treatment at the local tuberculosis treatment centre, he defaulted after commencing treatment. Adequate evaluation of patients with testicular mass by means of abdominal and scrotal ultrasound coupled with fine needle aspiration cytology is critical to diagnostic accuracy, optimal treatment and possibility of avoiding surgery in those with testicular tuberculosis. Source


Badmos K.B.,Histopathology Unit
African Health Sciences | Year: 2012

Introduction: Isolated tuberculous epididymo-orchitis may closely mimic testicular tumour particularly in patients with no history of systemic TB thereby presenting a diagnostic and treatment challenges. Case report: A 44-year old man presented with 4 months history of left scrotal mass and had left orchidectomy following a presumptive diagnosis of testicular tumour. Histopathological diagnosis of testicular tuberculosis was subsequently made. Although the patient was thereafter referred for antituberculosis treatment at the local tuberculosis treatment centre, he defaulted after commencing treatment. Conclusion: Adequate evaluation of patients with testicular mass by means of abdominal and scrotal ultrasound coupled with fine needle aspiration cytology is critical to diagnostic accuracy, optimal treatment and possibility of avoiding surgery in those with testicular tuberculosis. Source


Mitra S.,University of Cambridge | Dove J.,Histopathology Unit | Somisetty S.K.,Neonatal Unit
European Journal of Pediatrics | Year: 2011

Subcutaneous fat necrosis (SCFN) of the newborn is an uncommon, self-limiting panniculitis mostly occurring within the first few weeks after birth. SCFN has been described mostly in term or post-term newborn infants in literature. We report a preterm infant developing extensive subcutaneous fat necrosis within the first week of life after significant perinatal hypoxic injury. The infant was conservatively managed for subcutaneous fat necrosis but developed hypercalcaemia and required prolonged medical treatment. Hypercalcaemia is a rare but serious complication of subcutaneous fat necrosis and needs prolonged follow-up. The etiopathogenesis of both subcutaneous fat necrosis in newborn and the resultant hypercalcaemia are poorly understood. Conclusion: Significant subcutaneous fat necrosis can develop in both preterm and term infants, and preterm infants also develop significant complications including hypercalcaemia. © Springer-Verlag 2011. Source


AbdullGaffar B.,Pathology Section | Raman L.,Histopathology Unit | Khamas A.,Surgery Unit | AlBadri F.,Surgery Unit
Obesity Surgery | Year: 2016

Background: Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is a relatively new bariatric surgical procedure to reduce weight in morbidly obese patients, with an overall low rate of complications and thus gaining a worldwide popularity. It provides an opportunity to study the pathology of the stomach in obese patients. Most studies, however, focused on clinical aspects, surgical techniques, and postoperative complications. Few authors studied the histopathologic findings. Whether routine histopathologic examination is warranted in patients with grossly unremarkable LSG specimens and nonsignificant clinical history was not previously studied. Methods: We conducted a prospective study over 8 years to compare the prevalence, the morphologic spectrum and importance of histopathologic findings, and the frequency of incidental neoplasms in LSG specimens with other studies. We also proposed a protocol for the gross handling and sectioning of LSG specimens. Results: We found 546 LSG specimens. Five patients developed iatrogenic postoperative complications, two of which pursued a medicolegal case. There was no association between the histopathologic findings and the complications. Less than 1 % of incidental benign lesions were found. No malignancies were identified. All of the patients without postoperative complications had uneventful outcome after 5 months to 6 years follow-up. Conclusions: Routine microscopic examination of all LSG specimens is not necessary. Selective microscopic examination guided by relevant clinical history and macroscopic examination is a better option. This protocol will save money, time, and workload without compromising patient’s safety and future management. However, a careful gross description is still necessary in certain cases for potential future medicolegal implications. © 2015, Springer Science+Business Media New York. Source

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