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Fakhoury H.A.,King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences | Cereb N.,Histogenetics | Jawdat D.,King Abdullah International Medical Research Center | Al Jumah M.,King Abdullah International Medical Research Center | And 3 more authors.
International Journal of Immunogenetics | Year: 2014

Two new HLA- DRB1 alleles were identified by sequence-based typing method (SBT) in 1100 participants in the Saudi Stem Cell Donor Registry. HLA-DRB1*11:150 differs from HLA-DRB1*11:01:01G by a single C to A substitution at nucleotide position 5580 in exon 2, resulting in an amino acid change from alanine to glutamic acid at position 74. HLA-DRB1*14:145 differs from HLA-DRB1*14:04 by a C to G substitution at nucleotide position 5511 in exon 2, resulting in an amino acid change from threonine to arginine at position 51. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Source


Fakhoury H.A.,King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences | Jawdat D.,King Abdullah International Medical Research Center | Alaskar A.S.,King Abdullah International Medical Research Center | Al Jumah M.,King Abdullah International Medical Research Center | And 3 more authors.
International Journal of Immunogenetics | Year: 2014

In this report, we present two novel HLA-A alleles: HLA-A*02:433 and HLA-A*02:434. These alleles were identified by sequence-based typing method (SBT), in two donors for the Saudi Bone Marrow Donor Registry (SBMDR). Allele A*02:433 is identical to A*02:05:01G except for a G to A substitution at nucleotide position 449 in exon 2. This substitution results in glycine to serine substitution at position 83. Whereas, allele A*02:434 is identical to A*02:01:01G except for a C to A substitution at nucleotide position 245 in exon 2, which results in phenylalanine to threonine substitution at position 15. The generation of both alleles appears to be the result of nucleotide point mutation involving 02:01:01 and 02:05:01. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Source


Fakhoury H.A.,King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences | Jawdat D.,King Abdullah International Medical Research Center | Alaskar A.S.,King Abdullah International Medical Research Center | Al Jumah M.,King Abdullah International Medical Research Center | And 3 more authors.
International Journal of Immunogenetics | Year: 2015

Three new HLA-C alleles were identified by sequence-based typing method (SBT) in donors for the Saudi Bone Marrow Donor Registry (SBMDR). HLA-C*14:02:13 differs from HLA-C*14:02:01 by a silent G to A substitution at nucleotide position 400 in exon 2, where lysine at position 66 remains unchanged. HLA-C*15:72 differs from HLA-C*15:22 by a nonsynonymous C to A substitution at nucleotide position 796 in exon 3, resulting in an amino acid change from phenylalanine to leucine at position 116. HLA-C*15:74 differs from HLA-C*15:08 by a nonsynonymous C to T substitution at nucleotide position 914 in exon 3, resulting in an amino acid change from arginine to tryptophan at position 156. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Source


Schmidt A.H.,German Bone Marrow Donor Center | Schmidt A.H.,DKMS Life Science Laboratory | Solloch U.V.,German Bone Marrow Donor Center | Pingel J.,German Bone Marrow Donor Center | And 7 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2013

Regional HLA frequency differences are of potential relevance for the optimization of stem cell donor recruitment. We analyzed a very large sample (n = 123,749) of registered Polish stem cell donors. Donor figures by 1-digit postal code regions ranged from n = 5,243 (region 9) to n = 19,661 (region 8). Simulations based on region-specific haplotype frequencies showed that donor recruitment in regions 0, 2, 3 and 4 (mainly located in the south-eastern part of Poland) resulted in an above-average increase of matching probabilities for Polish patients. Regions 1, 7, 8, 9 (mainly located in the northern part of Poland) showed an opposite behavior. However, HLA frequency differences between regions were generally small. A strong indication for regionally focused donor recruitment efforts can, therefore, not be derived from our analyses. Results of haplotype frequency estimations showed sample size effects even for sizes between n≈5,000 and n≈20,000. This observation deserves further attention as most published haplotype frequency estimations are based on much smaller samples. © 2013 Schmidt et al. Source

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