Histocompatibility Laboratory

Berre-les-Alpes, France

Histocompatibility Laboratory

Berre-les-Alpes, France
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PubMed | Chungnam National University, Konkuk University and Histocompatibility Laboratory
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Tissue antigens | Year: 2015

The genetic diversity of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules of pigs has not been well characterized. Therefore, the influence of MHC genetic diversity on the immune-related traits of pigs, including disease resistance and other MHC-dependent traits, is not well understood. Here, we attempted to develop an efficient method for systemic analysis of the polymorphisms in the epitope-binding region of swine leukocyte antigens (SLA) class I genes. We performed a comparative analysis of the last 92 bp of the 5 untranslated region (UTR) to the beginning of exon 4 of six SLA classical class I-related genes, SLA-1, -2, -3, -4, -5, and -9, from 36 different sequences. Based on this information, we developed a genomic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct sequencing-based comprehensive typing method for SLA-2. We successfully typed SLA-2 from 400 pigs and 8 cell lines, consisting of 9 different pig breeds, and identified 49 SLA-2 alleles, including 31 previously reported alleles and 18 new alleles. We observed differences in the composition of SLA-2 alleles among different breeds. Our method can be used to study other SLA class I loci and to deepen our knowledge of MHC class I genes in pigs.


PubMed | Hopital Laennec, Paris Translational Research Center for Organ Transplantation, Hopital La Pitie, Histocompatibility Laboratory and Cardiothoracic Transplantation Unit
Type: Journal Article | Journal: American journal of transplantation : official journal of the American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons | Year: 2016

In heart transplantation, there is a lack of robust evidence of the specific causes of late allograft failure. We hypothesized that a substantial fraction of failing heart allografts may be associated with antibody-mediated injury and immune-mediated coronary arteriosclerosis. We included all patients undergoing a retransplantation for late terminal heart allograft failure in three referral centers. We performed an integrative strategy of heart allograft phenotyping by assessing the heart vascular tree including histopathology and immunohistochemistry together with circulating donor-specific antibodies. The main analysis included 40 explanted heart allografts patients and 402 endomyocardial biopsies performed before allograft loss. Overall, antibody-mediated rejection was observed in 19 (47.5%) failing heart allografts including 16 patients (40%) in whom unrecognized previous episodes of subclinical antibody-mediated rejection occurred 4.53.5 years before allograft loss. Explanted allografts with evidence of antibody-mediated rejection demonstrated higher endothelitis and microvascular inflammation scores (0.890.26 and 2.250.28, respectively) compared with explanted allografts without antibody-mediated rejection (0.420.11 and 0.360.09, p=0.046 and p<0.0001, respectively). Antibody-mediated injury was observed in 62.1% of failing allografts with pure coronary arteriosclerosis and mixed (arteriosclerosis and atherosclerosis) pattern, while it was not observed in patients with pure coronary atherosclerosis (p=0.0076). We demonstrate that antibody-mediated rejection is operating in a substantial fraction of failing heart allografts and is associated with severe coronary arteriosclerosis. Unrecognized subclinical antibody-mediated rejection episodes may be observed years before allograft failure.


Evans N.D.,University of Warwick | Moyse H.A.J.,University of Warwick | Lowe D.,University of Warwick | Lowe D.,Histocompatibility Laboratory | And 6 more authors.
Automatica | Year: 2013

Binding affinities are useful measures of target interaction and have an important role in understanding biochemical reactions that involve binding mechanisms. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) provides convenient real-time measurement of the reaction that enables subsequent estimation of the reaction constants necessary to determine binding affinity. Three models are considered for application to SPR experiments - the well-mixed Langmuir model and two models that represent the binding reaction in the presence of transport effects. One of these models, the effective rate constant approximation, can be derived from the other by applying a quasi-steady state assumption. Uniqueness of the reaction constants with respect to SPR measurements is considered via a structural identifiability analysis. It is shown that the models are structurally unidentifiable unless the sample concentration is known. The models are also considered for analytes with heterogeneity in the binding kinetics. This heterogeneity further confounds the identifiability of key parameters necessary for reliable estimation of the binding affinity. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


PubMed | University of Manitoba, Histocompatibility Laboratory, Bordeaux University Hospital Center, Bordeaux University and University of Lyon
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : JASN | Year: 2016

C1q-binding ability may indicate the clinical relevance of de novo donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies (DSA). This study investigated the incidence and risk factors for the appearance of C1q-binding de novo DSA and their long-term impact. Using Luminex Single Antigen Flow Bead assays, 346 pretransplant nonsensitized kidney recipients were screened at 2 and 5 years after transplantation for de novo DSA, which was followed when positive by a C1q Luminex assay. At 2 and 5 years, 12 (3.5%) and eight (2.5%) patients, respectively, had C1q-binding de novo DSA. De novo DSA mean fluorescence intensity >6237 and >10,000 at 2 and 5 years, respectively, predicted C1q binding. HLA mismatches and cyclosporine A were independently associated with increased risk of C1q-binding de novo DSA. When de novo DSA were analyzed at 2 years, the 5-year death-censored graft survival was similar between patients with C1q-nonbinding de novo DSA and those without de novo DSA, but was lower for patients with C1q-binding de novo DSA (P=0.003). When de novo DSA were analyzed at 2 and 5 years, the 10-year death-censored graft survival was lower for patients with C1q-nonbinding de novo DSA detected at both 2 and 5 years (P<0.001) and for patients with C1q-binding de novo DSA (P=0.002) than for patients without de novo DSA. These results were partially confirmed in two validation cohorts. In conclusion, C1q-binding de novo DSA are associated with graft loss occurring quickly after their appearance. However, the long-term persistence of C1q-nonbinding de novo DSA could lead to lower graft survival.


PubMed | Center Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Institute dHemato Oncologie Pediatrique, Tissue and Cells Bank, Histocompatibility Laboratory and Registre France Greffe de Moelle
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Human immunology | Year: 2016

In the absence of an HLA matched familial donor, a search for an unrelated donor or cord blood unit is initiated through worldwide registries. Although a first look-up on available HLA information of donors in the book at BMDW (Bone Marrow Donor Worldwide) can provide a good estimation of the number of compatible donors, the variety of resolution typing levels requires confirmatory typing (CT) which are expensive and time consuming. In order to help recipient centers in their work. The French donor registry (France Greffe de Moelle/Agence de la Biomedecine) has recently developed a software program called EasyMatch that uses haplotype frequencies to compute the likelihood of phenotypic match in donors according to various typing resolution levels. The goal of our study is to report a single monocentric user-experience with EasyMatch, demonstrating that its routine use reduced the cost and the delay of the donor search in our center, allowing the definition of a new strategy to search compatible unrelated donors. The strategy was first established on a retrospective cohort of 217 recipients (185 adults and 32 children=before score) and then validated on a prospective cohort of 171 recipients (160 adults and 11 children=after score). For all patients, we calculated the delay between the registration day and the donor identification day, and the number of CT requested to the donor centre. Considering both groups, we could observe a significant decrease of the number of CT from 8 to 2 (p<0,001), and a significant decrease of the median delay to identify a suitable donor from 43 to 31days (p<0.0001). EasyMatch estimates the number of potentially identical donors, but doesnt foresee availability of the donors. It provides us an easy tracking of mismatches, an estimation of the number of potential donors, the selection of population following ethnic origin of patients and a high prediction when probability is high or low. It affords a new approach of donor search in our daily work and improves the efficiency in the great challenge of the compatible donor identification.


Pedersen L.E.,Technical University of Denmark | Jungersen G.,Technical University of Denmark | Sorensen M.R.,Technical University of Denmark | Ho C.-S.,Histocompatibility Laboratory | Vadekaer D.F.,Technical University of Denmark
Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology | Year: 2014

The swine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genomic region (SLA) is extremely polymorphic comprising high numbers of different alleles, many encoding a distinct MHC class I molecule, which binds and presents endogenous peptides to circulating T cells of the immune system. Upon recognition of such peptide-MHC complexes (pMHC) naïve T cells can become activated and respond to a given pathogen leading to its elimination and the generation of memory cells. Hence SLA plays a crucial role in maintaining overall adaptive immunologic resistance to pathogens.Knowing which SLA alleles that are commonly occurring can be of great importance in regard to future vaccine development and the establishment of immune protection in swine through broad coverage, highly specific, subunit based vaccination against viruses such as swine influenza, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, foot-and-mouth-disease virus and others.Here we present the use of low- and high-resolution PCR-based typing methods to identify individual and commonly occurring SLA class I alleles in Danish swine. A total of 101 animals from seven different herds were tested, and by low resolution typing the top four most frequent SLA class I alleles were those of the allele groups SLA-3*04XX, SLA-1*08XX, SLA-2*02XX, and SLA-1*07XX, respectively. Customised high resolution primers were used to identify specific alleles within the above mentioned allele groups as well as within the SLA-2*05XX allele group. Our studies also suggest the most common haplotype in Danish pigs to be Lr-4.0 expressing the SLA-1*04XX, SLA-2*04XX, and SLA-3*04XX allele combination. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.


PubMed | Histocompatibility Laboratory and Technical University of Denmark
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Veterinary immunology and immunopathology | Year: 2014

The swine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genomic region (SLA) is extremely polymorphic comprising high numbers of different alleles, many encoding a distinct MHC class I molecule, which binds and presents endogenous peptides to circulating T cells of the immune system. Upon recognition of such peptide-MHC complexes (pMHC) nave T cells can become activated and respond to a given pathogen leading to its elimination and the generation of memory cells. Hence SLA plays a crucial role in maintaining overall adaptive immunologic resistance to pathogens. Knowing which SLA alleles that are commonly occurring can be of great importance in regard to future vaccine development and the establishment of immune protection in swine through broad coverage, highly specific, subunit based vaccination against viruses such as swine influenza, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, foot-and-mouth-disease virus and others. Here we present the use of low- and high-resolution PCR-based typing methods to identify individual and commonly occurring SLA class I alleles in Danish swine. A total of 101 animals from seven different herds were tested, and by low resolution typing the top four most frequent SLA class I alleles were those of the allele groups SLA-3*04XX, SLA-1*08XX, SLA-2*02XX, and SLA-1*07XX, respectively. Customised high resolution primers were used to identify specific alleles within the above mentioned allele groups as well as within the SLA-2*05XX allele group. Our studies also suggest the most common haplotype in Danish pigs to be Lr-4.0 expressing the SLA-1*04XX, SLA-2*04XX, and SLA-3*04XX allele combination.


Essler S.E.,University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna | Ertl W.,University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna | Deutsch J.,University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna | Ruetgen B.C.,University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna | And 6 more authors.
Animal Genetics | Year: 2013

The porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) harbors the highly polymorphic swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) class I and II gene clusters encoding glycoproteins that present antigenic peptides to T cells in the adaptive immune response. In Austria, the majority of commercial pigs are F 2 descendants of F 1 Large White/Landrace hybrids paired with Pietrain boars. Therefore, the repertoire of SLA alleles and haplotypes present in Pietrain pigs has an important influence on that of their descendants. In this study, we characterized the SLA class I (SLA-1, SLA-2, SLA-3) and class II (SLA-DRB1, SLA-DQB1, SLA-DQA) genes of 27 purebred Pietrain pigs using a combination of the high-resolution sequence-based typing (SBT) method and a low-resolution (Lr) PCR-based method using allele-group, sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP). A total of 15 class I and 13 class II haplotypes were identified in the studied cohort. The most common SLA class I haplotype Lr-43.0 (SLA-1 *11XX- SLA-3 *04XX- SLA-2 *04XX) was identified in 11 animals with a frequency of 20%. For SLA class II, the most prevalent haplotype, Lr-0.14 [ SLA-DRB1 *0901- SLA-DQB1 *0801- SLA-DQA *03XX], was found in 14 animals with a frequency of 26%. Two class II haplotypes, tentatively designated as Lr-Pie-0.1 [ SLA-DRB1 *01XX/be01/ha04- SLA-DQB1 *05XX- SLA - DQA*blank] and Lr-Pie-0.2 [ SLA-DRB1 *06XX- SLA-DQB1 *03XX- SLA-DQA *03XX], appeared to be novel and have never been reported so far in other pig populations. We showed that SLA genotyping using PCR-SSP-based assays represents a rapid and cost-effective way to study SLA diversity in outbred commercial pigs and may facilitate the development of more effective vaccines or identification of disease-resistant pigs in the context of SLA antigens to improve overall swine health. © 2012 The Authors.


Lerret N.M.,Rush University Medical Center | Rogozinska M.,Rush University Medical Center | Jaramillo A.,Rush University Medical Center | Jaramillo A.,Histocompatibility Laboratory | Marzo A.L.,Rush University Medical Center
PLoS ONE | Year: 2012

Adoptive T cell therapy has proven to be beneficial in a number of tumor systems by targeting the relevant tumor antigen. The tumor antigen targeted in our model is Mammaglobin-A, expressed by approximately 80% of human breast tumors. Here we evaluated the use of adoptively transferred Mammaglobin-A specific CD8 T cells in combination with low dose irradiation to induce breast tumor rejection and prevent relapse. We show Mammaglobin-A specific CD8 T cells generated by DNA vaccination with all epitopes (Mammaglobin-A2.1, A2.2, A2.4 and A2.6) and full-length DNA in vivo resulted in heterogeneous T cell populations consisting of both effector and central memory CD8 T cell subsets. Adoptive transfer of spleen cells from all Mammaglobin-A2 immunized mice into tumor-bearing SCID/beige mice induced tumor regression but this anti-tumor response was not sustained long-term. Additionally, we demonstrate that only the adoptive transfer of Mammaglobin-A2 specific CD8 T cells in combination with a single low dose of irradiation prevents tumors from recurring. More importantly we show that this single dose of irradiation results in the down regulation of the macrophage scavenger receptor 1 on dendritic cells within the tumor and reduces lipid uptake by tumor resident dendritic cells potentially enabling the dendritic cells to present tumor antigen more efficiently and aid in tumor clearance. These data reveal the potential for adoptive transfer combined with a single low dose of total body irradiation as a suitable therapy for the treatment of established breast tumors and the prevention of tumor recurrence. © 2012 Lerret et al.


PubMed | Histocompatibility Laboratory
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Immunology today | Year: 2014

Strictly defined, tissue-specific antigens are antigens characteristic of one particular tissue or cell. They are usually associated with autoimmunity and are remarkably homologous between species. In contrast, histocompatibility (H) antigens reflect polymorphism within species - they are alloantigens - and class-I major H complex (MHC) antigens - at least mouse H-2D and H-2 K and human HLA-A and -B, the commonest targets of acute allograft rejection - are widely distributed in the body; class-II MHC antigens - mouse Ia and human DR - have a much more limited distribution, being expressed primarily on B lymphocytes and on macrophages and other cells involved in antigen presentation and immune activation. This review is devoted to H antigens other than class-IIMHC antigens with limited if not highly specific, tissue distribution. Some of these antigens are classic tissue-specific antigens, others are alloantigens with limited tissue expression. Much of the evidence that they evoke immune responses that damage or destroy transplanted tissue is incomplete or circumstantial, but some is convincing and includes the immunogenetic characterization of new antigen systems that may have to be reckoned with clinically, especially when dealing with HLA-matched transplants.

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