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Yamamoto M.,Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Survivors Hospital | Yamamoto M.,National Kyushu Cancer Center | Yoshinaga K.,Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Survivors Hospital | Matsuyama A.,Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Survivors Hospital | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology | Year: 2014

Purpose: Increased levels of tumor marker in intra-operative peritoneal lavage are associated with an earlier detection of recurrent peritoneal dissemination. Method: Intra-operative peritoneal lavage samples from 193 patients with gastric cancer were obtained to determine the levels of the tumor markers, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and cancer-related antigen 72-4 (CA72-4) using a chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay. Results: The peritoneal lavage CEA (CY-CEA), CA72-4 (CY-CA72-4) and serosal invasion were independent factors predicting the peritoneal dissemination including CY(+). The patients were divided into four groups on the basis of peritoneal lavage tumor marker status; group A: CY-CEA (-), CY-CA72-4 (-) group (CEA < 0.5 ng/ml, CA72-4 < 1.3 U/ml); group B: CY-CEA (-), CY-CA72-4 (+) group (CEA < 0.5 ng/ml, CA72-4 ≥ 1.3 U/ml); group C: CY-CEA (+), CY-CA72-4 (-) group (CEA ≥ 0.5 ng/ml, CA72-4 < 1.3 U/ml); and group D: CY-CEA (+), CY-CA72-4 (+) group (CEA ≥ 0.5 ng/ml, CA72-4 ≥ 1.3 U/ml). The 5-year survival among the patients in groups A, B, C and D was 87, 68, 38 and 20 %, respectively (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: Combined analysis of these markers is therefore considered to be helpful for accurately determining sites of recurrence and the prognosis in advanced gastric cancer patients. © 2014 Springer-Verlag. Source


Yamamoto M.,Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Survivors Hospital | Yamamoto M.,National Kyushu Cancer Center | Taguchi K.,National Kyushu Cancer Center | Yamanaka T.,Research Center for Innovation Oncology | And 4 more authors.
Annals of Surgical Oncology | Year: 2013

Background: In the decade after the 1945 atomic bombing of Hiroshima, a high incidence of leukemia was observed among atomic bomb survivors. However, the incidence of other cancers gradually increased, while that of leukemia decreased after this period. We evaluated the clinical outcome of early gastric cancer and microsatellite stability over a long-term period in atomic bomb survivors. Methods: The results of surgical treatment for early gastric cancer were reviewed for 117 atomic bomb survivors and 394 control patients between 1995 and 2006. In addition, immunohistochemical staining for hMSH2 and hMLH1 expression was performed to evaluate the status of microsatellite stability in 57 atomic bomb survivors and 82 control patients. Results: The long-term survival rate for early gastric cancer in atomic bomb survivors was significantly lower than that in control patients (p < 0.01). Multivariable analysis revealed that age and sex were significant and independent prognostic factors for early gastric cancer. Defective hMSH2 and/or hMLH1 expression was also significantly higher in survivors than in control patients (p < 0.001). Logistic regression analysis revealed that atomic bomb survivorship was related to defective hMSH2 and/or hMLH1 expression. Conclusions: The prognosis of early gastric cancer in atomic bomb survivors was poor and was related to age and sex, rather than to being an atomic bomb survivor. Furthermore, a higher rate of defective hMSH2 and/or hMLH1 expression was observed in the survivors. © 2012 Society of Surgical Oncology. Source

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