Garfield Heights, OH, United States
Garfield Heights, OH, United States

Hiram College is a private liberal arts college located in Hiram, Ohio. It was founded in 1850 as the Western Reserve Eclectic Institute by Amos Sutton Hayden and other members of the Disciples of Christ Church. The college is nonsectarian and coeducational. It is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. Hiram's most famous alumnus is James A. Garfield, who also served as a college instructor and principal, and was subsequently elected the 20th President of the United States. Wikipedia.


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News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Community for Accredited Online Schools, a leading resource provider for higher education information, has ranked the best two- and four-year colleges with online programs in the state of Ohio for 2017. Among four-year schools a total of 41 made the list, with University of Akron, University of Toledo, University of Cincinnati, Ohio University and Ashland University coming in as the top five schools. The state’s top 18 two-year schools were also honored, with Sinclair College, Cincinnati State Technical and Community College, Belmont College, Edison State Community College and Columbus State Community College taking the top five spots. Schools were ranked based on over a dozen different data points. “Student enrollment in schools within the University System of Ohio has grown 8 percent over the past decade,” said Doug Jones, CEO and founder of AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org. “As more students pursue post-secondary degrees, the schools on our list are providing more flexible, high-quality learning opportunities outside the traditional classroom.” To be included on the Best Online Schools list, colleges must meet specific base requirements, including being institutionally accredited and public or private not-for-profit institutions. Each college is scored based on additional criteria that includes its employment and counseling resources, student/teacher ratios, graduation rates and financial aid availability. For more details on where each school falls in the rankings and the data and methodology used to determine the lists, visit: Ohio’s Best Online Four-Year Schools for 2017 include the following: Ashland University Baldwin Wallace University Bowling Green State University-Main Campus Case Western Reserve University Cedarville University Cleveland State University Defiance College Franciscan University of Steubenville Franklin University God’s Bible School and College Hiram College Kent State University at Kent Kent State University at Salem Kettering College Malone University Miami University-Oxford Mount Carmel College of Nursing Mount Saint Joseph University Mount Vernon Nazarene University Muskingum University Notre Dame College Ohio Christian University Ohio University-Main Campus Otterbein University Shawnee State University The University of Findlay Tiffin University Union Institute & University University of Akron Main Campus University of Cincinnati-Main Campus University of Dayton University of Mount Union University of Northwestern Ohio University of Rio Grande University of Toledo Urbana University Ursuline College Walsh University Wright State University-Lake Campus Wright State University-Main Campus Youngstown State University Ohio’s Best Online Two-Year Schools for 2017 include the following: Belmont College Bowling Green State University-Firelands Central Ohio Technical College Cincinnati State Technical and Community College Clark State Community College Columbus State Community College Cuyahoga Community College Edison State Community College Hocking College Lakeland Community College Lorain County Community College Marion Technical College North Central State College Northwest State Community College Rhodes State College Sinclair College Stark State College University of Akron Wayne College ### About Us: AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable, quality education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success.


News Article | August 26, 2016
Site: cleantechnica.com

What if it was easy to find out how much energy a home uses and how much that energy costs? It could unlock a whole new market that doesn’t exist today worth hundreds of billions. According to an Elevate Energy study, Chicago homes that disclosed energy costs sold almost ⅓ faster (43 vs. 63 days) and had higher deal closing rates (63% vs. 53%). Barry Haaser and Jeremy Roberts at the Green Button Alliance noted studies in Illinois and Washington DC that said simply disclosing energy costs raised average sale prices by $4000, regardless of energy use. Transparency is the likely reason for this – there is less uncertainty and friction in the transaction. Putting a metric on energy use that is easily comparable between homes could begin to value efficient homes more in addition to this effect. The question becomes what metric(s) is best for doing this? Rather than a laundry list, we need to focus on one or two that could fit in a 50×75 pixel box on MLS. If Zillow/Trulia added it to their listings, that could be the essential first step. I propose Energy Use Intensity, or EUI as kBTU/square foot/year. The rest of this article will show my reasoning. Focusing down to one or two metrics forces us to think of them in multiple levels. The metric we should be looking for is top level, similar to combined city and highway mileage for a new car. That helps narrow the field of what vehicles to consider, once we narrow down, then we dig deeper into more metrics like what city and highway mileage are, horsepower, safety features, etc. In the home buying process, this metric will be used at the stage right after prequalifying. For example a buyer qualifies for a $200,000 loan. What that really means is their income allows them to spend $950/mo at 4% for 30 years. Enter an energy metric. The real cost to own this example home includes taxes ($200/mo), insurance ($100/mo), and utilities ($200/mo). So what you’re really looking for is about $1450/month including all costs. This ignores maintenance costs for now. What if one of the homes being compared is Net Zero after solar panels and a Home Performance upgrade? Now utilities are only $35/mo for meter fees. That frees up $165/mo out of the $1450. $165/mo at 4% is $22,000 over 15 years or $34,000 over 30. That means a house with those energy bills vs. a comparable home is likely to be worth $20,000-$35,000 more than its comps. Possibly more because a home like that is likely to have fewer maintenance issues since efficient homes usually have lower air leakage rates and lower air leakage typically leads to fewer moisture problems. That’s for the market to decide. Right now the market can’t see energy costs, so it doesn’t value them. If we knew how much operating costs were for 5 comparable homes, and one home had double the operating cost, that would be an easy way to potentially cross one home off the list. That’s what this metric needs to do. The trouble with cost alone is that it’s very squishy. It’s not a useful metric over long periods. Costs go up and down. The same house may cost $200/mo with lower energy costs, but 10 years ago when costs were higher it could have been $300/mo for the same usage. Different fuels experience different pricing ups and downs. Fuel costs aren’t directly comparable either, an oil heat home generally costs a good deal more to heat than a comparable natural gas heated one. In my opinion, the top level metric needs to be usage based, cost is a secondary metric, although a close second. If those are the benefits, there are a number of things this top level metric needs to do well. EUI (site) has all of these except the raw part. I feel it’s worth the sacrifice for that one item, particularly because with only three numbers behind it – electric usage, heating fuel usage, and square footage, it’s easy to figure out if any funny business was going on. Plus it has a unique benefit: In kBTU/square foot/year the scale for EUI generally falls in a range between zero and one hundred. This is very similar to a HERS score, and like a HERS score, zero is net zero. A 0 EUI means either no energy usage or completely offset energy usage. EUI 100 is a bit piggish, but not awful. Explaining what 6.4 million BTUs per year means to a homeowner sounds like work. Explaining 0-100 sounds very simple. Here is a chart of Energy Smart Home Performance’s projects using EUI using the ResiSpeak tool: The highlighted home with a 24.9 EUI is an all electric Deep Energy Retrofit for Hiram College called the TREE House. Is it possible that home might be worth more than the home at 100? (Ironically, that is my house.) Passive Houses aim at 4.75 kBTU/sf/yr for heating and cooling. 475 Supply is named after it. The Department of Energy has the Building Performance Database which uses EUI and has data on thousands of homes across the US. It’s not something new we have to come up with. In fact, here are my projects overlaid on the Building Performance Database homes in Ohio: EUI only needs fuel usage and square footage. Fuel usage usually comes from utility bills, so those are tough to game. We’re down to gaming square footage. I propose we use county record square footages. County records have these attributes: My argument is for two primary energy metrics: Energy Use Intensity (EUI in kBTU/square foot/year) and total annual energy cost. These are only ‘top level’ metrics. The raw data needs to be available so that deeper analysis can be made when narrowing to a few home choices. These metrics can create total transparency around ownership costs of homes and influence home values, opening up a new market for Home Performance upgrades and lowering risks for lenders. Lower risks mean lower interest rates, which mean more projects make economic sense: a virtuous cycle. This virtuous cycle can lead to numerous societal benefits: jobs that can’t be exported, reduced pollution, reduced health consequences from that pollution, and an easier transition off of fossil fuels because more homes will be capable of going all electric. (We have four pre-1920 all electric homes under our belts now – one is getting solar panels this month.) There are many more benefits that could be argued for as well. All because we started publishing a few numbers. Is this rosy? Of course, but it’s probably not that far off. Chant with me: EUI! EUI! It’s not that hard to make it a reality, if Zillow and Trulia add it, or the National Association of Realtors pushes for it, it could happen very quickly. The Green Button program can be used with monthly data, making data access for easier. This isn’t that hard of a lift. If you have any interest in helping, reach out! This 1900 Cleveland home had a substantial energy retrofit. A 53% air leakage reduction, complete insulation package, and new forced air HVAC system including ductwork and fresh air was installed. It doesn’t look any different than it used to, but it’s much healthier and comfortable than it used to be. The EUI last winter was shockingly low: 10.9. That was unoccupied during a mild winter with a low set point, I look forward to seeing what it is this winter. Shouldn’t this home be worth more because of these upgrades? You can read more about the project and it’s “womb-like comfort” here. Building Science Corporation – Kohta Ueno – Review of building energy use metrics. A great overview of energy metrics. Ironically he argues against EUI, but Ueno’s aim is understanding the deeper implications of energy use, not a top level metric for driving market value. Well worth a read. For more insights on pricing home energy efficiency, here’s an article CleanTechnica‘s Kyle Field published on the topic earlier this year: Buying a house is an exciting part of life, the start of a new chapter, and frankly…freakin’ scary! Typically that’s not because of any spooky creatures but because of the massive mortgage that people usually take on to afford one, the number of things that can go wrong, and unforeseen financial burdens that these ‘money pits’ can become. Many of the financial pitfalls can be identified early on in the buying process as part of a quality home inspection, but there’s one big dirty secret that many homes have that is a bit harder to wrap your head around when buying a new place – energy. I’m not talking about the qi (or ch’i) of the house or anything like that, but literally about the energy used by the house on an annual basis in all forms – electricity, natural gas, propane, heating oil, solar, wind, solar thermal, geothermal, etc Let’s back up a bit. Pretend you’re buying a new car. Do you check the window sticker to see what options it comes with? How about the fuel efficiency? Estimated cost to operate for a year? Me too! …and it’s the same for a house. We want to know which energy options it comes with. Does it use natural gas for heating? Have a high tech heat pump in the basement that is dirt cheap to own and operate? Fuel efficiency similarly translates into energy intensity. You thought I was going to say energy efficiency there, right? The actual metric for putting data behind this is the amount of energy used per square foot of the house. Roll that up over the size of the house and the months of the year and you get the mega-metric – the total cost of energy to operate for a year. Before cars kept track of fuel efficiency, knowing what miles-per-gallon your car got was irrelevant to the market – you don’t care what your car gets and the market doesn’t value it…and it’s the same thing with a home. You can invest $15k in solar panels, $10k in energy efficiency improvements, and $3k in a new heat pump, but you’re not going to see much of that money rolling back into the valuation of the house because people don’t speak that language yet. We need to retrain our brains, and the market, to accurately value not just the cost of the house but the cost to run the house month to month. For example, let’s dig in to the numbers on two houses: Obviously the second house is worth more, and is a better value for the same purchase price. But just how MUCH more does an energy bill that’s $400 lower (every month!) make the house worth? Backing up a bit, how do we even quantify the monthly cost of energy for a house? Putting a price tag on the cost of energy is the first step in getting a handle on the value of residential renewables – such as solar – into the valuation of the house. That allows homeowners to see the month-to-month cost and quickly extrapolate the cost of energy over the life of the house (the long term cost of energy). This could be accomplished by reapplying the concept of the Energy Star label on appliances: Beyond just the base concept of putting a dollar value on, and an increased visibility of, the cost of energy, less efficient homes are actually more risky to banks. Think about it. In the example above, house A carries an energy bill of $450/month vs house B with just a $50/month bill. That’s an extra $400 of monthly debt on house A that will never go away for the homeowner. That effectively takes the monthly payment for the house from $1000 to $1450 whereas House B is only going to cost $1050/month – a huge difference. One of my favorite sayings that I’ve heard about solar is that it takes a monthly liability (the monthly bill) and turns it into an asset (increased value of the house). Homes with higher energy bills are riskier investments for banks, as the monthly energy cost is not taken into account when the home is financed. It’s essentially a highly variable chunk of debt (particularly in this era of increasing efficiency and solar) that the bank not only doesn’t know about, but doesn’t seem to care about. In markets where the energy bill is a large percentage of the mortgage, this can play a large factor in whether a homeowner can actually afford the full cost of the home or not. Further, the variations in energy price can, and likely often do today, single-handedly sink the homeowner’s monthly budget and kick the loan into default. Finally, these energy costs can be rolled up over the life of the loan as part of the purchasing process. House B might only cost $18k in energy costs over 30 years whereas house A would tip the scales at $162k!! Granted, not many people are interested in stepping back and looking at the total cost of energy over 30 years, but lifetime costs often paint a picture compelling enough to trigger small changes. If we looked at energy costs this way more often, solar and energy efficiency would be much more likely to have increased value when the house hits the market. Markets value what is measured. We need to measure energy use and turn consumption into an easy to understand comparable metric – like MPG is for fuel efficiency. Doing that will trigger banks and financial institutions to dig a bit deeper into the value of energy efficiency and residential power generation as a part of the lending process and overall risk assessment. If Energy Use Intensity is being looked at by financial institutions, services like Zillow will start reporting EUI, which completes the cycle back to the consumers. Homeowners would have more incentive to invest in technologies that are better over the long run and often for the planet, such as making that $5k investment in more insulation, spending $300 on LED light bulbs, or $15k on solar. Homeowners can have the confidence that they are making an investment in the house and in a reduction in monthly operating costs over the life of the home, or at least of the product being installed. For LEDs, that’s just 22.6 years…what a ripoff 🙂   Drive an electric car? Complete one of our short surveys for our next electric car report.   Keep up to date with all the hottest cleantech news by subscribing to our (free) cleantech newsletter, or keep an eye on sector-specific news by getting our (also free) solar energy newsletter, electric vehicle newsletter, or wind energy newsletter.  


News Article | December 14, 2016
Site: www.PR.com

Buckley King welcomes Adrienne N. Cvetkovic to its Commercial Litigation Practice in Cleveland. Cleveland, OH, December 14, 2016 --( Adrienne earned her JD cum laude from Case Western Reserve University School of Law and her BA magna cum laude from Hiram College. About Buckley King: Buckley King is a solutions-driven law firm. Brent M. Buckley, the Firm's Managing Partner states, "our attorneys and professionals work hard every day, on every engagement, to provide outstanding client experiences based upon value, quality, efficiency and thought-leadership. We provide counsel that is objective, practical, on time/on budget, and with an independence of 'straight answers.'" Rethink your outside counsel.(R) Cleveland, OH, December 14, 2016 --( PR.com )-- The law firm of Buckley King is pleased to announce that Adrienne N. Cvetkovic has joined the Firm as an associate in its Commercial Litigation Practice in Cleveland, Ohio. Adrienne advises clients in resolving commercial and business disputes including representing them in state and federal courts. She has considerable experience in assessing and mitigating damages in construction claims and managing construction risks.Adrienne earned her JD cum laude from Case Western Reserve University School of Law and her BA magna cum laude from Hiram College.About Buckley King:Buckley King is a solutions-driven law firm. Brent M. Buckley, the Firm's Managing Partner states, "our attorneys and professionals work hard every day, on every engagement, to provide outstanding client experiences based upon value, quality, efficiency and thought-leadership. We provide counsel that is objective, practical, on time/on budget, and with an independence of 'straight answers.'" Rethink your outside counsel.(R)


To fulfill a variety of goals in building the library's music collection and connecting it with both the campus community and the region, the Hiram College Library began a project in 2005 to create a collection of Northeast Ohio music. Focusing on sound recordings, the library has amassed a collection of more than 800 CDs in 8 years through purchase, publicity, and donations. Analysis of the results of this project and attempts to gather interest through social networking reveals the challenges and opportunities in this endeavor. As a long-term project, much work remains to be done, and possible future directions are outlined. © Taylor & Francis.


Newkome G.R.,University of Akron | Shreiner C.,Hiram College
Chemical Reviews | Year: 2010

A study was conducted to demonstrate the derivation of dendrimers from 1→3 branching motifs. A three-atom distance was needed between the branch point and the reactive chemical center to circumvent retardation of these chemical transformations. Triol was treated with the chloroacetic acid, esterified (MeOH,H+ to produce polyester reduced (LAH) and transformed (TsCl) to the corresponding tris(tosylate). The simplest 1→3 branched monomer TRIS had been used for simple amidation where it readily transformed esters to the corresponding amide by a facile two-step procedure, transesterification followed by rearrangement. This ester triol transformation was also demonstrated in the conversion of numerous initially nondendritic hydrophobic materials into more hydrophilic compounds, such as neutral, cyclophanedodecaalcohol.


Chenoweth A.M.,Hiram College | Fountain S.B.,Kent State University
Neurobiology of Learning and Memory | Year: 2015

Atropine sulfate is a muscarinic cholinergic antagonist which impairs acquisition and retention performance on a variety of cognitive tasks. The present study examined the effects of atropine on acquisition and retention of a highly-structured serial pattern in a serial multiple choice (SMC) task. Rats were given daily intraperitoneal injections of either saline or atropine sulfate (50. mg/kg) and trained in an octagonal operant chamber equipped with a lever on each wall. They learned to press the levers in a particular order (the serial pattern) for brain-stimulation reward in a discrete-trial procedure with correction. The two groups learned a pattern composed of eight 3-element chunks ending with a violation element: 123-234-345-456-567-678-781-818 where the digits represent the clock-wise positions of levers in the chamber, dashes indicate 3-s pauses, and other intertrial intervals were 1. s. Central muscarinic cholinergic blockade by atropine caused profound impairments during acquisition, specifically in the encoding of chunk-boundary elements (the first element of chunks) and the violation element of the pattern, but had a significant but negligible effect on the encoding of within-chunk elements relative to saline-injected rats. These effects persisted when atropine was removed, and similar impairments were also observed in retention performance. The results indicate that intact central muscarinic cholinergic systems are necessary for learning and producing appropriate responses at places in sequences where pattern structure changes. The results also provide further evidence that multiple cognitive systems are recruited to learn and perform within-chunk, chunk-boundary, and violation elements of a serial pattern. © 2015 Elsevier Inc.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 399.00K | Year: 2010

This Major Research Instrumentation award funds the acquisition of a Liquid Chromatography Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometer (LC ESI-MS) at Hiram College. The new LCMS system provides a unique way to elucidate the structure of molecules in complex experiments, and will help faculty at Hiram College to identify fatty acids in biological samples (plasma & insects), detect secondary plant metabolites, analyze large chlorinated compounds, and differentiate metabolic profiles of wild-type and mutant Xenopus. The research projects at Hiram College are at the forefront of their respective fields and will be used as a training ground for undergraduates both in classroom courses and independent research projects. The LCMS will be used as part of a collaborative program at Hiram College, Research in the Classroom, that allows students to experience real world research problems as part of their coursework. Such an approach fosters independent thought within each student in the classroom as they conduct their research in the field or in the lab. Results from the studies conducted with the LCMS will be broadly disseminated through abstracts and peer reviewed publications, as well as by active participation of students and faculty at professional meetings.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: CONDENSED MATTER & MAT THEORY | Award Amount: 124.37K | Year: 2016

NONTECHNICAL SUMMARY
This award made on a Research at an Undergraduate Institute (RUI)proposal supports computational and theoretical research and education to study transformations in the size and shape assumed by long chain-like molecules, polymers, as they respond to changes in their environment, such as changes in temperature and pressure. The PI will use advanced computer simulation techniques and models to advance understanding of this important problem. Changes in the size and shape of the polymers in biological cells are often necessary to carry out functions at the biomolecular level to sustain life. A better understanding of this process contributes to developing design principles for smart materials that change their properties in response to changes in their environment in a way that is reversible. Smart materials have many applications, including actuators, sensors, and a wide range of medical devices.

This research program has been designed to allow for maximum student participation by dovetailing into the physics curriculum at Hiram College. Computation and simulation methods taught in the core courses establish a direct link between classroom learning and this research program and provide students with the tools needed to make meaningful contributions to this work. The undergraduate students who participate in this research will benefit by learning state of the art computer simulation techniques and will have opportunities to present at scientific meetings. Many students who have worked with the PI at Hiram, have, or will be, pursuing advanced study in physics, materials science, engineering, or medicine. The PI aims to continue to provide successful educational experiences for students, and to help recruit more under-represented students into the sciences.


TECHNICAL SUMMARY
This award made on an Research at an Undergraduate Institution (RUI) proposal supports computational and theoretical research and education that addresses conformational phase transitions of single polymer molecules in response to variations in environmental variables such as temperature, pressure, or solution pH. This topic is of broad importance since both the bulk properties of polymer containing materials and the functionality of biopolymers and many polymer-based smart materials are directly linked to the underlying microscopic conformation of individual polymer molecules. Many smart or biologically active materials utilize polymer chains tethered to surfaces while biopolymers typically operate in very crowded macromolecular environments. In this geometrically constrained environment polymers can behave differently and a focus of this research is on the basic physics of polymer confinement with specific applications to materials design. This research continues and extends recent work by the PI with significant contributions from undergraduate collaborators in the areas of solvent effects on polymer conformation and phase transitions of isolated homopolymer chains.

The research objectives of this project are to:

(i) elucidate the effects of local environment on the conformational phase transitions of a single polymer chain as relevant, for example, to the design and function of polymer-based environmentally responsive smart materials;

(ii) study single-polymer phase transitions, in particular, polymer all-or-none folding, which can provide an on/off switch in smart materials applications, in crowded or geometrically confined environments; and

(iii) develop rigorous analysis tools such as partition function zeros and free energy landscapes to study phase transitions and transition pathways in polymer systems.

This work will make use of both a solvation potential approach, recently developed by the PI to reduce computational complexity in modeling polymer-solvent systems, and advanced simulation techniques that allow for direct computation of the density of states of classical many-body systems. The latter methods provide complete thermodynamic information and can be used to carry out subsequent multi-canonical simulations to determine structural information.

This research contributes to the understanding of single-macromolecule behavior through the development of rigorous solvation potentials, density of states simulation methods, and new analysis techniques. It will contribute to efforts to develop rational design principles for functional polymer-based and biomimetic materials. This research program has been designed to allow for maximum undergraduate student participation by dovetailing into the physics curriculum at Hiram College. Computation and simulation methods taught in the core physics courses establish a direct link between classroom learning and this research program, and provide students with the tools needed to make meaningful contributions to this work. The undergraduate students who participate in this research will benefit by learning state of the art computer simulation techniques and will have opportunities to present at scientific meetings. Many students who have worked with the PI at Hiram, have, or will be, pursuing advanced study in physics, materials science, engineering, or medicine. The PI aims to continue to provide successful educational experiences for students, and to help recruit more under-represented students into the sciences.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 116.16K | Year: 2012

TECHNICAL SUMMARY
This award made on an RUI proposal supports computational and theoretical research and education that addresses conformational phase transitions of single polymer molecules in response to variations in environmental variables such as temperature, pressure, or solution pH. This topic is of broad importance since both the bulk properties of polymer containing materials and the functionality of biopolymers and many polymer-based smart materials are directly determined by the underlying microscopic conformation of individual polymer molecules. Many smart or biologically active materials utilize polymer chains tethered to surfaces or nanoparticles. The effects of tethering and, more generally, confinement on single-chain phase transitions will also be investigated. This research continues and extends the recent work by the PI with significant contributions from undergraduate collaborators in the areas of solvent effects on polymer conformation and phase transitions of isolated homopolymer chains.
The research objectives of this project are:
(i) to elucidate the effects of local environment on the conformational phase transitions of a single polymer chain as relevant, for example, to the design and function of polymer based environmentally responsive smart materials;
(ii) to study single-polymer phase transitions, in particular, the recently discovered homopolymer all-or-none folding transition, in simple models in order to establish the underlying physics of the universal aspects of protein folding; and
(iii) to develop conformation and free energy landscapes using a rigorous microcanonical approach to study transition order, pathways, and kinetics of single-chain phase transitions.
This work will make use of both the solvation potential approach, recently developed by the PI to reduce computational complexity in modeling polymer-solvent systems, and advanced simulation techniques that allow for direct computation of the density of states of classical many-body systems. The latter methods provide complete thermodynamic information and can be used to carry out subsequent multi-canonical simulations to determine structural information.
This research contributes to the understanding of single-macromolecule behavior through the development of rigorous solvation potentials, density of states simulation methods, and microcanonical analysis techniques. It will contribute to efforts to develop rational design principles for functional polymer-based and biomimetic. This research program has been designed to allow for maximum student participation by dovetailing into the physics curriculum at Hiram College. Computation and simulation methods taught in the core courses establish a direct link between classroom learning and this research program and provide students with the tools needed to make meaningful contributions to this work. The undergraduate students who participate in this research will benefit by learning state of the art computer simulation techniques and will have opportunities to present at scientific meetings. Of the fourteen students who have worked with the PI at Hiram, twelve are now, or will be pursuing advanced study in physics, materials science, or engineering. This research proposal intends to continue such student successes and the PI hopes that these successes will help recruit more under-represented students into the sciences.

NON-TECHNICAL SUMMARY
This award made on an RUI proposal supports computational and theoretical research and education to study transformations in the size and shape assumed by long chain-like molecules, polymers, as they respond to changes in their environment, such as changes in temperature and pressure. The PI will use advanced computer simulation techniques and models to advance understanding of this important problem. Changes in the size and shape of the polymers in living systems are often necessary to carry out functions at the biomolecular level to sustain life. A better understanding of this process contributes to developing design principles for smart materials that change their properties in response to changes in their environment in way that is reversible. Smart materials have many applications, including actuators, sensors, and a wide range of medical devices.
This research program has been designed to allow for maximum student participation by dovetailing into the physics curriculum at Hiram College. Computation and simulation methods taught in the core courses establish a direct link between classroom learning and this research program and provide students with the tools needed to make meaningful contributions to this work. The undergraduate students who participate in this research will benefit by learning state of the art computer simulation techniques and will have opportunities to present at scientific meetings. Of the fourteen students who have worked with the PI at Hiram, twelve are now, or will be pursuing advanced study in physics, materials science, or engineering. This research proposal intends to continue such student successes and the PI hopes that these successes will help a recruit more under-represented students into the sciences.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 17.58K | Year: 2013

This collaboration among Seattle Pacific University, Augustana College, the University of Arizona, and Hiram College will formally evaluate the impact of authentic project-based research in core sciences curricula. In a previous CCLI project, the PI team constructed the Genomics Education National Initiative (GENI portal), a web-based project delivery system that provides remote access to authentic research. GENI supports classroom implementation of this research by providing protocols, training materials, expert advice, a networking community, and physical resources. The PI team is using this resource to integrate authentic project-based research into the curricula of five participating institutions (those listed above and the University of Wisconsin Madison). The PI team is also inviting current and future users of the program to participate in this assessment. The project is focusing on the evaluation of student learning, engagement, scientific literacy, problem-solving, and retention in the sciences and will study factors that influence faculty integration of authentic research into courses. In addition, they are evaluating the utility of the GENI portal curricula delivery system.

The Intellectual Merit of the proposed project lies in the systematic implementation and assessment of authentic project-based research in science curricula. These results will add to the limited research base on the effectiveness of integrating authentic research in major and non-major components of core science curricula across multiple disciplines and institutions. Through the use of mixed research methods, including controlled studies and qualitative approaches, data are being collected regarding the impact of authentic project-based research on student learning, attitudes, science career involvement and retention, problem solving, and collaboration. A focus on process and context variables is providing critical information regarding integration of authentic research into core science curricula including benefits and challenges for faculty and students, the role of an electronic delivery and project management system, and their use in multiple settings and across disciplines.

The Broader Impacts of this proposal reside in the comprehensive application of project-based research as the foundation of institutional change in undergraduate education. The combination of the resources provided by the GENI portal and the community it supports, complemented by in-depth assessment across multiple educational levels will facilitate integration of research at institutions that were unable to offer a high-quality research experience to their students and will allow the integration of research across curricula, making it an outstanding tool for reaching underserved populations and non-majors. It also provides a way for instructional faculty to re-integrate with mainstream research communities and for full-time researchers to disseminate their science to students of all levels at any institution or location. The data produced will help faculty and administrators integrate undergraduate research at their institutions.

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