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Garfield Heights, OH, United States

Hiram College is a private liberal arts college located in Hiram, Ohio. It was founded in 1850 as the Western Reserve Eclectic Institute by Amos Sutton Hayden and other members of the Disciples of Christ Church. The college is nonsectarian and coeducational. It is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. Hiram's most famous alumnus is James A. Garfield, who also served as a college instructor and principal, and was subsequently elected the 20th President of the United States. Wikipedia.


To fulfill a variety of goals in building the library's music collection and connecting it with both the campus community and the region, the Hiram College Library began a project in 2005 to create a collection of Northeast Ohio music. Focusing on sound recordings, the library has amassed a collection of more than 800 CDs in 8 years through purchase, publicity, and donations. Analysis of the results of this project and attempts to gather interest through social networking reveals the challenges and opportunities in this endeavor. As a long-term project, much work remains to be done, and possible future directions are outlined. © Taylor & Francis. Source


Newkome G.R.,University of Akron | Shreiner C.,Hiram College
Chemical Reviews | Year: 2010

A study was conducted to demonstrate the derivation of dendrimers from 1→3 branching motifs. A three-atom distance was needed between the branch point and the reactive chemical center to circumvent retardation of these chemical transformations. Triol was treated with the chloroacetic acid, esterified (MeOH,H+ to produce polyester reduced (LAH) and transformed (TsCl) to the corresponding tris(tosylate). The simplest 1→3 branched monomer TRIS had been used for simple amidation where it readily transformed esters to the corresponding amide by a facile two-step procedure, transesterification followed by rearrangement. This ester triol transformation was also demonstrated in the conversion of numerous initially nondendritic hydrophobic materials into more hydrophilic compounds, such as neutral, cyclophanedodecaalcohol. Source


Shura R.,Hiram College | Siders R.A.,Case Western Reserve University | Dannefer D.,Case Western Reserve University
Gerontologist | Year: 2011

Purpose: This study's purpose was to advance the process of culture change within long-term care (LTC) and assisted living settings by using participatory action research (PAR) to promote residents' competence and nourish the culture change process with the active engagement and leadership of residents. Design and Methods: Seven unit-specific PAR groups, each consisting of 4-7 residents, 1-2 family members, and 1-3 staff, met 1 hour per week for 4 months in their nursing home or assisted living units to identify areas in need of improvement and to generate ideas for community change. PAR groups included residents with varied levels of physical and cognitive challenges. Residents were defined as visionaries with expertise based on their 24/7 experience in the facility and prior life experiences. Results: All PAR groups generated novel ideas for creative improvements and reforms in their communities and showed initiative to implement their ideas. Challenges to the process included staff participation and sustainability. Implications: PAR is a viable method to stimulate creative resident-led reform ideas and initiatives in LTC. Residents' expertise has been overlooked within prominent culture change efforts that have developed and facilitated changes from outside-in and top-down. PAR may be incorporated productively within myriad reform efforts to engage residents' competence. PAR has indirect positive quality of life benefits as a forum of meaningful social engagement and age integration that may transform routinized and often ageist modes of relationships within LTC. © The Author 2010. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. Source


Schueller S.M.,University of Pennsylvania | Schueller S.M.,San Francisco General Hospital | Parks A.C.,University of Pennsylvania | Parks A.C.,Hiram College
Journal of Medical Internet Research | Year: 2012

Background: The recent growth of positive psychology has led to a proliferation in exercises to increase positive thoughts, behaviors, and emotions. Preliminary evidence suggests that these exercises hold promise as an approach for reducing depressive symptoms. These exercises are typically researched in isolation as single exercises. The current study examined the acceptability of several multi-exercise packages using online dissemination. Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate methods of dissemination that could increase the acceptability and effectiveness of positive psychology exercises. To achieve this goal, we compared the use of positive psychology exercises when delivered in packages of 2, 4, or 6 exercises. Methods: Self-help-seeking participants enrolled in this study by visiting an online research portal. Consenting participants were randomly assigned to receive 2, 4, or 6 positive psychology exercises (or assessments only) over a 6-week period. These exercises drew from the content of group positive psychotherapy. Participants visited an automated website that distributed exercise instructions, provided email reminders, and contained the baseline and follow-up assessments. Following each exercise, participants rated their enjoyment of the exercise, answered how often they had used each technique, and completed outcome measures. Results: In total, 1364 individuals consented to participate. Attrition rates across the 2-, 4-, and 6-exercise conditions were similar at 55.5% (181/326), 55.8% (203/364), and 52.7% (168/319) respectively but were significantly greater than the attrition rate of 42.5% (151/355) for the control condition (χ 2 3 = 16.40, P <.001). Participants in the 6-exercise condition were significant more likely than participants in the 4-exercise condition to use both the third (F 1,312 = 5.61, P =.02) and fourth (F 1,313 = 6.03, P =.02) exercises. For 5 of the 6 exercises, enjoyment was related to continued use of the exercise at 6-week follow-up (r's =.12 to. 39). All conditions produced significant reductions in depressive symptoms (F 1,656 = 94.71, P <.001); however, a significant condition by time interaction (F 3,656 = 4.77, P =.003) indicated that this reduction was larger in the groups that received 2 or 4 exercises compared with the 6-exercise or control condition. Conclusion: Increasing the number of exercises presented to participants increased the use of the techniques and did not increase dropout. Participants may be more likely to use these skills when presented with a variety of options. Increasing the number of exercises delivered to participants produced a curvilinear relationship with those in the 2- and 4-exercise conditions reporting larger decreases in depressive symptoms than participants in the 6-exercise or control conditions. Although research generally offers a single exercise to test isolate effects, this study supports that studying variability in dissemination can produce important findings. © Stephen M. Schueller, Acacia C. Parks. Source


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: CONDENSED MATTER & MAT THEORY | Award Amount: 124.37K | Year: 2016

NONTECHNICAL SUMMARY
This award made on a Research at an Undergraduate Institute (RUI)proposal supports computational and theoretical research and education to study transformations in the size and shape assumed by long chain-like molecules, polymers, as they respond to changes in their environment, such as changes in temperature and pressure. The PI will use advanced computer simulation techniques and models to advance understanding of this important problem. Changes in the size and shape of the polymers in biological cells are often necessary to carry out functions at the biomolecular level to sustain life. A better understanding of this process contributes to developing design principles for smart materials that change their properties in response to changes in their environment in a way that is reversible. Smart materials have many applications, including actuators, sensors, and a wide range of medical devices.

This research program has been designed to allow for maximum student participation by dovetailing into the physics curriculum at Hiram College. Computation and simulation methods taught in the core courses establish a direct link between classroom learning and this research program and provide students with the tools needed to make meaningful contributions to this work. The undergraduate students who participate in this research will benefit by learning state of the art computer simulation techniques and will have opportunities to present at scientific meetings. Many students who have worked with the PI at Hiram, have, or will be, pursuing advanced study in physics, materials science, engineering, or medicine. The PI aims to continue to provide successful educational experiences for students, and to help recruit more under-represented students into the sciences.


TECHNICAL SUMMARY
This award made on an Research at an Undergraduate Institution (RUI) proposal supports computational and theoretical research and education that addresses conformational phase transitions of single polymer molecules in response to variations in environmental variables such as temperature, pressure, or solution pH. This topic is of broad importance since both the bulk properties of polymer containing materials and the functionality of biopolymers and many polymer-based smart materials are directly linked to the underlying microscopic conformation of individual polymer molecules. Many smart or biologically active materials utilize polymer chains tethered to surfaces while biopolymers typically operate in very crowded macromolecular environments. In this geometrically constrained environment polymers can behave differently and a focus of this research is on the basic physics of polymer confinement with specific applications to materials design. This research continues and extends recent work by the PI with significant contributions from undergraduate collaborators in the areas of solvent effects on polymer conformation and phase transitions of isolated homopolymer chains.

The research objectives of this project are to:

(i) elucidate the effects of local environment on the conformational phase transitions of a single polymer chain as relevant, for example, to the design and function of polymer-based environmentally responsive smart materials;

(ii) study single-polymer phase transitions, in particular, polymer all-or-none folding, which can provide an on/off switch in smart materials applications, in crowded or geometrically confined environments; and

(iii) develop rigorous analysis tools such as partition function zeros and free energy landscapes to study phase transitions and transition pathways in polymer systems.

This work will make use of both a solvation potential approach, recently developed by the PI to reduce computational complexity in modeling polymer-solvent systems, and advanced simulation techniques that allow for direct computation of the density of states of classical many-body systems. The latter methods provide complete thermodynamic information and can be used to carry out subsequent multi-canonical simulations to determine structural information.

This research contributes to the understanding of single-macromolecule behavior through the development of rigorous solvation potentials, density of states simulation methods, and new analysis techniques. It will contribute to efforts to develop rational design principles for functional polymer-based and biomimetic materials. This research program has been designed to allow for maximum undergraduate student participation by dovetailing into the physics curriculum at Hiram College. Computation and simulation methods taught in the core physics courses establish a direct link between classroom learning and this research program, and provide students with the tools needed to make meaningful contributions to this work. The undergraduate students who participate in this research will benefit by learning state of the art computer simulation techniques and will have opportunities to present at scientific meetings. Many students who have worked with the PI at Hiram, have, or will be, pursuing advanced study in physics, materials science, engineering, or medicine. The PI aims to continue to provide successful educational experiences for students, and to help recruit more under-represented students into the sciences.

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