Himalayan Forest Research Institute

Shimla, India

Himalayan Forest Research Institute

Shimla, India
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Tewari V.P.,Himalayan Forest Research Institute | Singh B.,Arid forest Research Institute
Southern Forests | Year: 2017

Tectona grandis (teak) is one of the most important tropical timber species occurring naturally in India. In India, teak is the single most important commercial timber species. Scientifically sound growth models, based on advanced modelling techniques, are often not available, although they are necessary for the successful management of teak stands in the country. Long-term forest planning requires mathematical models. In this paper, an attempt is made to develop a dynamic growth model based on the limited data, consisting of three annual measurements, collected from 15 teak sample plots in Gujarat state of India. A biologically consistent whole-stand growth model is presented, which uses the state-space approach for modelling rates of change of dominant height, stand density and stand basal area. A simple model containing few free parameters performed well and is particularly well suited to situations where available data are scarce. © 2017 NISC (Pty) Ltd


Thakur S.D.,Sher-e-Kashmir University of Agricultural Sciences and Technology | Kapoor K.S.,Himalayan Forest Research Institute | Samant S.S.,Gb Pant Institute Of Himalayan Environment And Development
Ecology, Environment and Conservation | Year: 2017

An ethnobotanical analysis was conducted in order to document the traditionally used fodder plants in the study area. The present investigation is based on the extensive survey and collection of plants from Tirthan Wildlife Sanctuary, District Kullu, Himachal State in India, from March, 2009 to February 2011. The diversity of fodder plants is a proportion of the enormous biodiversity occurring in this part of the North Western Himalaya. A panorama of the biodiversity emerged in this study, which is of both tangible and intangible value for the livestock-and mountain communities living in the region. The findings suggest a very high scope of the utilization of this natural and uncultivated biodiversity for supporting livestock-based livelihoods in the region. Copyright © EM International.


Sharma B.,Himalayan Forest Research Institute | Sharma S.,Himalayan Forest Research Institute | Bhardwaj S.K.,Himachal Pradesh University
Nature Environment and Pollution Technology | Year: 2017

Industrialization has provided humanity with materials and social benefits. It has also brought in its wake up many unwanted substances and social problems. One of these problems is the degradation of the environment. The environment, upon which our life is most dependent, has fallen victim of pollution brought by the man himself through unplanned and unscientific development and mineral exploitation. Air pollution is an inevitable harmful by-product of rapid industrialization and urbanization that is responsible for a variety of deleterious effects on both human and plant communities. It has been a major environmental concern since the beginning of industrialization, resulting in a release of gaseous and particulate pollutants into the atmosphere. A relationship between traffic density and photosynthetic activity, stomatal conductance, total chlorophyll content and leaf senescence has been reported. Exposure of evergreen plants to air pollutants create many changes in physiological and biochemical parameters. Each plant species has a different ability to absorb and adsorb pollutants by their foliar surfaces, which is influenced by several biochemical, physiological and morphological characteristics. Rampant and uncontrolled use of fossil fuels in industries and transport sector has led to an increase in concentrations of the gaseous pollutants. Indian cities are facing serious problems of airborne particulate matter. Atmospheric particulate matter, which is a mixture of diverse elements, is of most concern in context of public health. Particulates may also cause a reduction in yield, change in photosynthesis and transpiration along with foliar injuries. The plant species which accumulate more dust onto their surfaces can act as buffer around industries and along roadsides. The present study deals with the plant-pollutant interactions and how the physical and chemical characteristics of plants vary with air pollution. It also throws light on how dust affects various plant species and what is the role of plants in dust accumulation. © 2017, Technoscience Publications. All rights reserved.


Rashmi,Forest Research Institute | Pant J.,AUM Agrotech Ltd. | Rajasekaran A.,Himalayan Forest Research Institute
Pharmacognosy Journal | Year: 2011

A sensitive and reliable densitometric High Performance Thin Layer Chromatography method has been developed for the quantification of berberine, an alkaloid present in roots of Berberis aristata. Chromatographic analysis was performed using methanol extract of roots of Berberis aristata on silica gel 60F 254 GLP (E.Merck) plates using the solvent system, n-propanol: formic acid: water (9:01:0.9). Detection and quantification of berberine was done by densitometric scanning at 364 nm. The results of linearity range and correlation coefficient show that there was a good correlation between peak area and corresponding concentration of berberine. The proposed HPTLC method provided a good resolution of berberine from other constituents present in methanol extract of roots of B. aristata and can be used for the quantification of berberine.


Thakur S.D.,Sher-e-Kashmir University of Agricultural Sciences and Technology | Kapoor K.S.,Himalayan Forest Research Institute | Samant S.S.,Gb Pant Institute Of Himalayan Environment And Development
Asian Journal of Microbiology, Biotechnology and Environmental Sciences | Year: 2017

Tree diversity in Tirthan Wildlife Sanctuary of Himachal Pradesh was studied during the year March, 2008-September, 2010. Diversity assessment of tree is important for in-situ conservation and deriving diversified uses of valuable flora on a sustainable basis. In the present study, 43 species of trees belonging to 33 genera and 20 families have been reported. Abies pindrow is the most dominated genera in the area, followed by Taxus baccata. Picea smithiana and Quercus semecarpifolia. An assessment of economic potential of the trees has also been made based on the first hand information generated from local inhabitants. The present study deals with several plant species and suggests that certain steps should be taken immediately under a well-planned strategy to conserve the rich tree diversity of study area. The present investigation is of special significance and could help to conserve the loss of tree diversity over long period. © Global Science Publications.


Negi P.S.,Himalayan Forest Research Institute | Subramani S.P.,Institute of Forest Genetics and Tree Breeding
International Journal of Conservation Science | Year: 2015

In view of changing food habits of local communities of Himachal Himalaya, a study to document the genetic resources of wild edible plant and traditional recipes was conducted in Kinnaur district of Himachal Pradesh, India. Rituals and cultural beliefs of the local people of Kinnaur plays significant role in conserving biodiversity. A total of 116 plant species belonging to 42 families were recorded from the study area. Among the four major life forms, herbs contributed the highest proportion of the edible species (57) followed by trees (32), shrubs (26) and climber (1). Fruits (50) are the highly consumed plant parts, followed by leaves (33), seeds (23), bulbs (6), resin/gum (6), roots (5), flowers (4), shoots (4), bark (2) and tubers (2) respectively. Chilgoza nut is the dominant wild edible and also the main source of revenue. This includes 13 threatened species under different Red List categories of IUCN 2000 and 8 species are endemic to Western Himalayas. Allium stracheyi, Angelica glauca, Betula utilis, Bunium persicum, Dioscorea deltoidea, Hippophae spp., Juglans regia, Pinus gerardiana, Prunus armeniaca, Prunus mira and Sinopodophyllum hexandrum are highly exploited species in wild and need to be conserved.


Sharma B.,Himalayan Forest Research Institute
International Journal of Global Environmental Issues | Year: 2016

The study is a comprehensive research on how do the various climatic parameters affect the social and economic status of farmers. The study is based on the stratified random sampling technique. The effects of change of the climatic factors are studied on the fruit crops, vegetable crops and agricultural crops along with the effect on livestock. The aim of this study is to determine whether or not, climate has had a detrimental effect on the choice of crop, usage of pesticides, and various adaptation techniques followed by the farmers. There has been a reduction in the quantity of trees, grasses and crop residue available as fodder. The yield of fruit trees has been hampered in the last 20 years. The agricultural crops have also witnessed the effect of climate change. Copyright © 2016 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.


Kumar P.,Jaypee University of Information Technology | Jaiswal V.,Himachal Pradesh University | Pal T.,Jaypee University of Information Technology | Singh J.,Himalayan Forest Research Institute | Chauhan R.S.,Jaypee University of Information Technology
Protoplasma | Year: 2016

Podophyllum species (Podophyllum hexandrum Royle and Podophyllum peltatum) are a major source of deriving anticancer drugs from their major chemical constituent, podophyllotoxin. However, information lacks on regulatory components of podophyllotoxin biosynthesis; therefore, different classes of transcription factors were identified through mining transcriptomes of Podophyllum species and validated through qRT-PCR analysis vis-à-vis podophyllotoxin contents in different tissues/organs of Podophyllum hexandrum. A total of 82, 278, 70, and 90 transcripts were identified in shoots and 89, 273, 72, and 91 transcripts in rhizomes of P. hexandrum transcriptome; 70, 268, 48, and 92 transcripts were in shoots and 58, 245, 41, and 85 transcripts in rhizomes of P. peltatum transcriptome corresponding to bZIP, MYB, WRKY, and bHLH families of transcription factors, which have been shown in regulating biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. Two unique transcripts encoding bHLH and MYB/SANT TFs in shoots of P. peltatum (medp_podpe_41091 and medp_podpe_2547) and bZIP and MYB TFs in rhizomes of P. hexandrum (medp_podhe_163581 and medp_podhe_147614) correlated with podophyllotoxin content. Quantification of podophyllotoxin and comparative expression analysis between high (2.51 %) versus low (0.59) podophyllotoxin content accessions revealed 0.04 to ~16-folds increase in transcripts of transcription factors, thereby further supporting the association of identified transcription factors with podophyllotoxin content. bZIP TF showed the highest transcript abundance (19.60-folds) in P. hexandrum rhizomes (2.51 % podophyllotoxin) compared to shoots (0.01 %). In silico analysis of putative promoter regions of pathway genes in other plant species revealed the presence of sequence elements for MYB and WRKY transcription factors, thereby suggesting their role in controlling the production of podophyllotoxin. A repertoire of additional transcription factors has been provided, which can be functionally validated and used in designing a suitable genetic intervention strategy towards enhanced production of podophyllotoxin. © 2015 Springer-Verlag Wien


Tewari V.P.,Himalayan Forest Research Institute
Forest Science and Technology | Year: 2015

National forest assessments are attracting increasing attention owing to their role in providing information related to manifold forest functions. Large-area information is in high demand, both for the forest in its role as ecosystem and in its role as resource and service provider. Of particular current interest are forest assessment systems at national level by countries that wish to engage in the REDD+ initiative. Large-area forest monitoring has never had a prominent place on the curricula of forestry faculties in India or many other tropical countries. As a consequence, in many tropical countries, there is only very limited technical capacity for large-area forest monitoring. The discipline of “forest inventory” has developed a versatile toolbox of techniques and methods useful for national level assessments, and remote sensing technology has, over the last few decades, added some exciting options to this toolbox. This article analyzes the process of national forest monitoring and identifies key areas where national capacity may be developed. A brief description of forest assessment in India, long-term observational studies, and synergy with the national forestry inventory is also presented. © 2015 Korean Forest Society


PubMed | Jaypee University of Information Technology, Himachal Pradesh University and Himalayan Forest Research Institute
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Protoplasma | Year: 2016

Podophyllum species (Podophyllum hexandrum Royle and Podophyllum peltatum) are a major source of deriving anticancer drugs from their major chemical constituent, podophyllotoxin. However, information lacks on regulatory components of podophyllotoxin biosynthesis; therefore, different classes of transcription factors were identified through mining transcriptomes of Podophyllum species and validated through qRT-PCR analysis vis--vis podophyllotoxin contents in different tissues/organs of Podophyllum hexandrum. A total of 82, 278, 70, and 90 transcripts were identified in shoots and 89, 273, 72, and 91 transcripts in rhizomes of P. hexandrum transcriptome; 70, 268, 48, and 92 transcripts were in shoots and 58, 245, 41, and 85 transcripts in rhizomes of P. peltatum transcriptome corresponding to bZIP, MYB, WRKY, and bHLH families of transcription factors, which have been shown in regulating biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. Two unique transcripts encoding bHLH and MYB/SANT TFs in shoots of P. peltatum (medp_podpe_41091 and medp_podpe_2547) and bZIP and MYB TFs in rhizomes of P. hexandrum (medp_podhe_163581 and medp_podhe_147614) correlated with podophyllotoxin content. Quantification of podophyllotoxin and comparative expression analysis between high (2.51%) versus low (0.59) podophyllotoxin content accessions revealed 0.04 to ~16-folds increase in transcripts of transcription factors, thereby further supporting the association of identified transcription factors with podophyllotoxin content. bZIP TF showed the highest transcript abundance (19.60-folds) in P. hexandrum rhizomes (2.51% podophyllotoxin) compared to shoots (0.01%). In silico analysis of putative promoter regions of pathway genes in other plant species revealed the presence of sequence elements for MYB and WRKY transcription factors, thereby suggesting their role in controlling the production of podophyllotoxin. A repertoire of additional transcription factors has been provided, which can be functionally validated and used in designing a suitable genetic intervention strategy towards enhanced production of podophyllotoxin.

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