Himalayan Ecological and Conservation Research Foundation

Rājpura, India

Himalayan Ecological and Conservation Research Foundation

Rājpura, India

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Zuber S.M.,Himalayan Ecological and Conservation Research Foundation | Winkle,Himalayan Ecological and Conservation Research Foundation | Rana S.,Himalayan Ecological and Conservation Research Foundation
Journal of Advanced Zoology | Year: 2010

Lake Mansar with its charismatic beauty is a cherished tourist spot with about 5 lac tourists visiting it per annum. But this tourist influx and ill planned development around the lake has always been a source of discomfort for the stakeholders living in its catchment area. Consequently the lake is under tremendous stress from various anthropogenic influences like faecal matter, runoff from cremation ground, detergents, third pollution, animal excreta, fertilizers, manure etc. which in one or the other way has adversely affected the water quality of the lake. To further deteriorate the condition of this aquatic ecosystem, conforms which owe their origin to the faecal matter contamination, are growing in numbers. The same fact gained reinforcement from the fact that about 13,509 cases of water borne diseases have been reported by the Block Medical Officer, Majalta. The present communication deals in detail the seasonal variability of the coliforms in the lake water.


Dutt H.C.,Himalayan Ecological and Conservation Research Foundation | Zubair S.M.,Himalayan Ecological and Conservation Research Foundation | Thakur W.,Himalayan Ecological and Conservation Research Foundation | Rana S.,Himalayan Ecological and Conservation Research Foundation
Research Journal of Environmental Toxicology | Year: 2011

Fluoride, an important aspect of the aquatic ecology influences not only the biological productivity but also the quality of water. Furthermore, quantum of anthropogenic influences and global volcanic activity also exerts an overwhelming effect on the concentration of fluoride in natural waters. Besides, ground water also contains higher concentrations of fluoride owing to leaching from rocks. Surinsar-Mansar ramsar site in NW rlimalayas includes two lakes where Lake Mansar is the biggest one and is an only one source of fresh water to support the livelihood and biodiversity of its vicinity. Thus, the contamination in the water or imbalance in the chemistry of the lake has been always proved as the main source of epidemics in the area. Besides drinking facility, the lake provides a heavy flush of water for the agriculture practice and livestock of the area. Since Lake Mansar is a closed lacustrine system receiving water from sub-terranean springs and rains due to western disturbances in sub-continent India, hence the present study was initiated to see the fluctuation in the fluoride concentration in the lake. © 2011 Academic Journals Inc.


Dutt H.C.,Jammu University | Dutt H.C.,Himalayan Ecological and Conservation Research Foundation | Bhagat N.,Jammu University | Pandita S.,Jammu University
Journal of Ethnopharmacology | Year: 2015

Ethnopharmacological relevance: The Gaddi community has been known for its shepherd profession from time immemorial. At least one family member or 4-5 people from a village adopt a nomadic lifestyle with their sheep flocks in between the hills of north western Himalaya. In Jammu and Kashmir, India, law enforcement has banned the collection of the medicinal plants from the wild except for the Gaddi, Gujjar and Bakerwal tribes who are permitted to collect the species for their personal use only. As a consequence, knowledge of medicinal plants lies with these tribes only. This study has been undertaken to assess the status of Oral Traditional Knowledge (OTK) on medicinal plant usage in one of these tribes, known as the Gaddi. The study has focused specifically on the Gaddi Shepherds as their nomadic lifestyle means that they are closely associated with nature and dependent on natural resources for their livelihood including treatment of various ailments. Material and methods: Data on indigenous knowledge has been collected through direct interviews of 53 shepherds of the Gaddi tribe and analyzed for quantitative parameters such as use-value and factor informant consensus. Results: A total of 190 plant species belonging to 70 families, growing along the migratory route of the Gaddi Shepherds are used to treat more than 80 different ailments and disorders. Leaves are the most common plant parts used by the Gaddi Shepherds. The older shepherds are much more aware about the traditional knowledge on medicinal plant usage than the younger ones. 56 plant species are used to treat a range of gastrointestinal and liver disorders, however, diabetic conditions and stings/bites by snakes/scorpions are treated using only two plant species each. Mentha longifolia with UV=0.26 is the species most commonly used by the informants for medicinal purposes. The low UV (below 1) and low Fic (near 0) is a common observation in the present study. Conclusions: The UV and Fic, analysis reveals that OTK on the medicinal plants is dwindling among the Gaddi Shepherds in Jammu and Kashmir, India. © 2015, Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.


Dutt H.C.,Jammu University | Dutt H.C.,Himalayan Ecological and Conservation Research Foundation | Bedi Y.S.,Indian Institute of Integrative Medicine
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences India Section B - Biological Sciences | Year: 2014

Estimation of spatial plant distribution of a large area is very tedious and time consuming assignment. In this regard, herbaria of the world are supposed to be the excellent repositories of the plant collections for reference purpose. But many repositories of the world do not have the associated information of the collections and thus it becomes a muddle for future studies. The aim of this study is to know the extent of this mess. Therefore, spatial distribution of Berberidaceae members in NW Himalaya was studied through available herbarium data in three herbaria at Department of Botany, University of Jammu, Janaki Ammal Herbarium, Indian Institute of Integrative Medicine and Herbarium, Department of Botany, Punjabi University. It is observed that the collected specimens in aforesaid herbaria are correctly identified; but simultaneously, proper collection sites and collection dates are not mentioned for some specimens. Therefore, it is difficult to recollect the species. This is also revealed that India harbours 04 genera (Berberis, Epimedium, Mahonia and Nandina) and 22 species of the Berberidaceae, out of which 02 (Berberis and Mahonia) are reported from the NW Himalaya. © 2013 The National Academy of Sciences, India.


Zuber S.M.,Himalayan Ecological and Conservation Research Foundation | Rana W.S.,Himalayan Ecological and Conservation Research Foundation | Dutt H.C.,Himalayan Ecological and Conservation Research Foundation
Journal of Advanced Zoology | Year: 2010

Cadmium is an important constituent of aquatic ecology which influences the quality of water. Furthermore, the quantum of anthropogenic intervention influences the concentration of Cadmium in natural waters. Since Lake Mansar is a closed lacustrine system receiving water from sub-terranean springs and monsoon rains, hence the present study was initiated and consequently it was observed that the lake waters have Cadmium content although within the permissible limits as recorded for any water body in the world.

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