Himachal Institute of Life science

Pāonta Sāhib, India

Himachal Institute of Life science

Pāonta Sāhib, India
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Chauhan P.K.,Himachal Institute of Life science | Singh V.,Himachal Institute of Life science | Abhishek B.,HIP
Journal of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Research | Year: 2011

The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of conventional (inorganic) and organic agricultural systems on the physico chemical and microbial properties of soil. Microbial population counts were analyzed from soil samples collected from the surface (0-10 cm) and sub surface (10-20 cm) soil depths of the treated plots by soil plate and dilution plate methods for bacteria. Results of the physico chemical analysis showed that the inorganically treated plots had significantly higher pH, nitrogen, potassium, phosphorus contents than the organically treated plots. On the other hand organically treated plots have the maximum microbial population counts and microbial biomass carbon which is followed by the inorganically treated plots and control. Organic plots exhibited a significant variation in bacterial population in both the soil depths with the inorganically treated plots and control. The application of organic fertilizers increased the organic carbon content of the soil and thereby increasing the microbial counts and microbial biomass carbon. The use of inorganic fertilizers resulted in low organic carbon content, microbial counts and microbial biomass carbon of the soil, although it increased the soil's nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium level which could be explained by the rates of fertilizers being applied. From the present study it has been concluded that the soil under organic agricultural system presents higher microbial activity and microbial biomass carbon than the conventional or inorganic agricultural system.


Rakesh M.R.,Himachal Institute of Pharmacy | Ashok K.,Himachal Institute of Life science | Kumar S.A.,Central University of Costa Rica | Amitabh T.,Himachal Institute of Life science
International Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences Review and Research | Year: 2010

All shampoos are basically water and detergent mixtures. The main objective of this study was to eliminate harmful materials from shampoo formulation and substitute them with a safe natural product. Formulators must play an active role in educating the consumers about the potential harmful effects of synthetic detergents and other chemical additives present in shampoos. We had taken three plants extract to formulate the herbal shampoo. The taken extracts of plant were Asparagus racemosus, Acacia concin, Sapindus mukorossi. Defatted air-dried plants powders were extracted with methanol in soxhlet apparatus set at 60°C for 24 hours. The solvent was evaporated at 50° C using rotary vacuum. The phytochemical screening was done to identify the natural phytochemical in these three plant extracts. The identification of all phytochemicals was finished through TLC. To formulate a clear shampoo base, definite amounts of saponin and salt were added to an aqueous solution containing extracts and juices along with glycerin (1%), methyl paraben (0.05%) and EDTA (0.15%) etc. Formulation was prepared by slightly heating and adding the weighed quantity of herbal ingredients extracts and juices. The pH of the Shampoo was adjusted to 5.5, to retain the acidic mantle of scalp. Synthetic preservatives have sometimes been the cause of adverse effects among consumers. We had used the physico-chemical approach toward preservation and by formulating a self preserving shampoo and it avoided this risk posed by chemical preservatives.


Kumar A.,Himachal Institute of Life science | Mali R.R.,Himachal Institute of Pharmacy
International Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences Review and Research | Year: 2010

Shampooing is the most common form of hair treatment. Shampoos are primarily been products aimed at cleansing the hair and scalp. In the present scenario, it seems improbable that herbal shampoo, although better in performance and safer than the synthetic ones, will be popular with the consumers. A more radical approach in popularizing herbal shampoo would be to change the consumer expectations from a shampoo, with emphasis on safety and efficacy. We have evaluated and compared the herbal shampoo, which was formulated in previous study, with two marketed shampoos. The findings of this investigation reveal that synthetic preservatives have sometimes been the cause of adverse effects among consumers. We have used the physico-chemical approach to preservation and by formulating a self preserving shampoo, have avoided this risk posed by chemical preservatives. However, the aesthetic attributes, such as lather and clarity, of the laboratory shampoo are not comparable with the marketed shampoos. The foam volume was on a par. Although the retail products were not fare so well in the tests conducted by us, they enjoy market popularity, especially if they foam well. This is mainly due to the false notion among consumers that 'a shampoo that foams well, works well', and no real effort on the part of manufacturers to counter this fallacy.


Devi A.,Hemwati Nandan Bahuguna Garhwal University | Singh V.,Himachal Institute of Life science | Bhatt A.B.,Hemwati Nandan Bahuguna Garhwal University
International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences | Year: 2011

Punica granatum is used widely in tropical and subtropical countries as source of antimicrobial agent against a variety of dental bacteria. A major cause of the dental disease is believed to be commensal bacteria which exist in dental plaque. In the present investigation we compared wild pomegranate (daru) and cultivated pomegranate seeds, white membrane and peel extract for their in vitro antibacterial potentiality. The antibacterial activity of methanolic fruit extract was evaluated against isolated bacteria by agar well diffusion method. Maximum antibacterial activity was shown by methanolic extract of the daru peel. The MIC is recorded as the lowest concentration of drug which showed clear fluid without turbidity. MIC of Punica granatum peel ranged from 0.1 to 3.2 mg mL-1. The present findings suggest that the methanolic extract of peel of daru can be used as a promising novel antibacterial agent in near future.


Talwar A.,Himachal Institute of Life science | Saxena S.,P.A. College | Kumar A.,Dehradun Institute of Technology
Journal of Environmental Biology | Year: 2016

Present study was conducted to assess the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among patients at various hospitals in Doon Valley, Uttrakhand. A total of 300 nasal swabs (male patients: 177, female patients: 123) were subjected to bacteriological investigation following established protocol. Isolates were verified by mannitol fermentation, Gram staining, DNAse test and coagulase positivity. S.aureus was isolated in 111 (37%) participants (M: 37%, F: 36.5%). Out of 111 S. aureus isolates, 38 (34.2%) were methicillin resistant (MRSA). Among them, 25 (38%) were male and 13 (29%) were from female. Highest MRSA colonization rate was found among dialysis ward patients (55.5%), followed by burn ward (32.5%) and general medical ward (22.7%) patients. The study also revealed that administration of recent antibiotic was chief predisposing factor for MRSA colonization. High MRSA carriage rate found in this study indicates demand for standard infection control to curb transmission. © Triveni Enterprises, Lucknow (India).


Sharma S.,Himachal Institute of Life science | Mall A.,Himachal Institute of Life science
African Journal of Microbiology Research | Year: 2011

In 1880, Staphylococcus aureus was first discovered by a surgeon named Sir Clifton Smithin pus from surgical abscesses in Aberdeen, Scotland. Methicillin, as the first beta-lactamase resistant penicillin, was used to treat S. aureus infection in 1961. The first methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was identified in the United Kingdom in the same year. It appeared in the United States in 1981 among intravenous drug users. MRSA is an important agent of hospital-acquired infection. Two hundred patients who were admitted in the Doon valley hospitals were screened for nasal colonization of MRSA. Morphological and biochemical identification was also done. Out of 200 nasal samples, 97 S. aureus were recovered. Crome agar was used in order to detect MRSA, only 23 S. aureus were recovered out of total 97 isolates. Antibiotic susceptibility was tested by using the disk diffusion technique on Mueller Hinton agar. A total of 12 antibiotics were used. Our study reveal the presence of MRSA in the Doon valley hospitals this might also be prevalent in other parts of India as antibiotic misuse is equally common there. This will help in treating this problem in referral hospitals. © 2011 Academic Journals.


Chauhan P.K.,Himachal Institute of Life science | Singh V.,Himachal Institute of Life science
Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Biomedicine | Year: 2012

Objective: To evaluate acute and subacute toxicity of the acetone extract of Centella asiatica (Brahmi). Methods: Toxicity of Centella asiatica was evaluated in Swiss mice after ingestion of the extract during one day (acute model) and during 15 days (subacute model). The Biochemical parameters evaluated included creatinine, calcium, inorganic phosphorous, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) were assessed using commercial kits. Results: The results of the present investigation revealed that the LD50 of the extract is higher than 4000mg/kg and subacute treatment did not shows any change in corporal weight and hematological parameters. However, a change in liver weight but not in hepatic enzymes was observed. This suggested that the liver function is not altered by Centella asiatica. Some changes in the creatinine content were observed but could not be relative with the extract dose. Conclusions: The results suggest that the plant seems to be destitute of toxic effects in mice. © 2012 Asian Pacific Tropical Biomedical Magazine.


Singh V.,Himachal Institute of Life science | Thakur K.,Himachal Institute of Life science | Chauhan P.K.,Himachal Institute of Life science
Asian Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research | Year: 2012

Pneumonia is an inflammatory condition of the lung, especially of the alveoli (microscopic air sacs in the lungs) associated with fever, chest symptoms, and consolidation on a chest radiograph. While typically caused by an infection there are a number of non-infectious causes. Infectious agents include: bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites. Typical symptoms include cough, chest pain, fever, and difficulty breathing. With increasing use of antibiotics these bacteria have evolved itself into the way that it is becoming more and more antibiotic resistant and case of ESBL producing bacteria has been reported in genus Klebsiella. The aim of this work is based on assessing the prevalence of the bacteria Klebsiella pneumonia in the patients of pneumonia, and to check the activity of medicinal plants and their effect in synergism with allopathic drugs against the organism. Fruit parts and aerial parts of five medicinal plants of Dasmodium Gangeticum, Nelumbo Nucifera, Canabis, Sesame White and Sesame Black have been used in the form of three different extract i.e. Methanolic, Ethanolic and Aqueous and their activity was assessed.


Chauhan S.,Shoolini University of Biotechnology and Management Sciences | Farooq U.,Shoolini University of Biotechnology and Management Sciences | Singh V.,Himachal Institute of Life science | Kumar A.,Indian Institute of Education
International Journal of Pharma and Bio Sciences | Year: 2013

Milk is a key contributor to improving nutrition and food security. The virtues of milk as a food have long been recognized by human beings. Milk is however a good medium for bacterial growth and an efficient vehicle for bacterial infection when consumed without boiling or pasteurization. The aim of the present study was to evaluvate the presence of ESBL producing Klebsiella species present in raw milk of Doon valley in India. The study was carried out from July 2007 to July 2008. A total of 100 samples of raw milk were collected from Doon valley. These samples were cultured and the isolated organisms were identified by standard bacteriological methods. A total of 27 samples were found to be positive for Klebsiella species. Further ESBL phenotypic screening was performed. All 27 isolates found ESBL producing. Isolated Klebsiella spp showed 96.29% susceptibility to imipenem followed by ciprofloxacin (62.96%), piperacillin/tazobactam combination (51.85%) and ciftazidime (18.51%). This study reveals that Klebsiella isolated from raw milk in Doon valley produce ESBL in large proportion. The imipenem antibiotic which was found highly sensitive to ESBL producing klebsiella isolates might be a drug of choice.


Devi A.,Hemwati Nandan Bahuguna Garhwal University | Singh V.,Himachal institute of life science | Bhatt A.B.,Hemwati Nandan Bahuguna Garhwal University
International Journal of Pharma and Bio Sciences | Year: 2011

Streptococcus is the leading cause of dental diseases worldwide and is considered to be the most cariogenic of all of the oral bacteria. The total 150 dental plaque sample were collected from Uttranchal dental college and hospital dehradun and different dental clinics of dehradun. Out of 320 isolates recovered prevalence of Streptococcus sp. was 50%. 10 antibiotics were used against the recovered isolates. 80% of the recovered isolates revealed the sensitive activity against amoxicillin (25 mcg), ampicillin (25 mcg), chloramphenicol (30 mcg), erythromycin (30 mcg), clindamycin (30 mcg), tetracycline (30 mcg), penicillin (100 mcg) and resistant activity against metronidazole (30 mcg), ciprofloxacin (25 mcg), and gentamycin (25 mcg). The antibacterial activity of Punica granatum against the recovered isolates was studied by using agar well diffusion method. Out of four different solvents used in the present study 90 % of the recovered isolates showed the maximum zone of inhibition against the methanolic extract of Punica granatum i.e. 25 mm.

Loading Himachal Institute of Life science collaborators
Loading Himachal Institute of Life science collaborators