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Pascagoula, MS, United States

Huang T.D.,HII Ingalls Shipbuilding | Harbison M.,HII Ingalls Shipbuilding | Kvidahl L.,HII Ingalls Shipbuilding | Niolet D.,HII Ingalls Shipbuilding | And 14 more authors.
Journal of Ship Production and Design | Year: 2014

As high-strength thin-steel use in ship design increases, dimensional management becomes critical to control construction costs and schedule in ship production. In the U.S. shipbuilding industry, improvements to shipbuilding facili ties and processing technology have not kept pace with the rate of change in ship design. Additionally, new designs using thinner steels are subject to legacy weld-sizing criteria, which may inappropriately size welds on lightweight materials. These two factors result in widespread over welding, causing severe plate buckling in naval vessels during construction. The problem of over welding has two distinct sources: 1) the weld-sizing methods developed in the 1980s are still used in most shipbuilding specifications regardless of ship class. This prevents the incentive of application of latest technologies that can make strong, precision fillet welds for modern lightweight thin steel naval surface combatants; and 2) shipyard welders tend to make welds even larger than design requirements to satisfy naval production specifications, which do not allow for any undersized welds. On average, production welds are 3 mm larger than design, which can more than double the heat input and distortion caused by welding. The approach to the solution of this over welding problem will be described in detail in this article: 1) develop appropriate weld-sizing criteria for thin plate structure s; this an be facilitated by numerical modeling to ensure adequate static shear, tensile, bending, fatigue, and dynamic impact capacity of structural welds; and 2) perform a robust designed experiment to establish confidence that small weld sizes can provide necessary performance and strength to meet the design service life of the vessel and provide data to NAVSEA technical warrant holders to support the implementation of an under weld tolerance for ship production to prevent over welding. Source


Huang T.D.,HII Ingalls Shipbuilding | Harbison M.,HII Ingalls Shipbuilding | Kvidahl L.,HII Ingalls Shipbuilding | Niolet D.,HII Ingalls Shipbuilding | And 16 more authors.
Journal of Ship Production and Design | Year: 2016

As high-strength thinner-steel implementation in ship designs increase, dimensional management becomes critical to control construction costs and schedule in ship production. In the U.S. shipbuilding industry, improvements to shipbuilding facilities and processing technology have not kept pace with the rate of change in ship design. Additionally, new designs using thinner steels are subject to legacy weld sizing criteria possibly leading to inappropriately sized welds on lightweight materials. These two factors result in widespread overwelding, causing severe plate deformation in naval vessels during construction and nonvalue added labor to correct as needed for fit-up tolerances. Historically, shear and fatigue strength data has been focused on the larger welds and thicker steel plates typical of the state of the practice when these legacy weld sizing criteria were developed. In order to optimize weld design and production in modern, lightweight naval surface vessels, there is a need to develop more accurate data about the performance of precision fillet welds for thin steels. Source

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