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— "Global Smart Grid Storage Technology Market " provides, wherever applicable and relevant, technical data of products, and sheds useful light on expected commercial production dates and current R&D status. This report will help the viewer in Better Decision Making. The major players in global market include : Altairnano, Beacon Power, Ice Energy, ABB Ltd, Amber Kinetics, GE Energy Storage, Highview Power Storage, Samsung SDI Energy, Sumitomo. Geographically, this report split global into several key Regions, with, revenue (million USD), market share and growth rate of Smart Grid Storage Technology for these regions, from 2012 to 2022 (forecast):  United States  EU  Japan  China  India  Southeast Asia If you have any special requirements, please let us know and we will offer you the report as you want. Request a sample for this report @ http://www.orbisresearch.com/contacts/request-sample/277523 . And if u want to BUY this report @ http://www.orbisresearch.com/contact/purchase/277523 . Chapter One: Industry Overview Chapter Two: Global Smart Grid Storage Technology Competition Analysis by Players Chapter Three: Company (Top Players) Profiles and Key Data Chapter Four: Global Smart Grid Storage Technology Market Size Application (2012-2017) Chapter Five: United States Smart Grid Storage Technology Development Status and Outlook Chapter Six: EU Smart Grid Storage Technology Development Status and Outlook Chapter Seven: Japan Smart Grid Storage Technology Development Status and Outlook Chapter Eight: China Smart Grid Storage Technology Development Status and Outlook Chapter Nine: India Smart Grid Storage Technology Development Status and Outlook Chapter Ten: Southeast Asia Smart Grid Storage Technology Development Status and Outlook Chapter Eleven: Market Forecast by Regions and Application (2017-2022) Chapter Twelve: Smart Grid Storage Technology Market Dynamics Chapter Thirteen: Market Effect Factors Analysis Chapter Fourteen: Research Finding /Conclusion Figure Global Smart Grid Storage Technology Market Size (Million USD) Status and Outlook (2012-2022) Table Global Market Smart Grid Storage Technology Revenue (Million USD) Comparison by Regions 2012-2022 Figure Global Smart Grid Storage Technology Market Share by Regions (2012-2017) Figure United States Smart Grid Storage Technology Market Size (Million USD) and Growth Rate (2012-2017) Figure EU Smart Grid Storage Technology Market Size (Million USD) and Growth Rate (2012-2017) Figure Japan Smart Grid Storage Technology Market Size (Million USD) and Growth Rate (2012-2017) Figure China Smart Grid Storage Technology Market Size (Million USD) and Growth Rate (2012-2017) Figure India Smart Grid Storage Technology Market Size (Million USD) and Growth Rate (2012-2017) Figure Southeast Asia Smart Grid Storage Technology Market Size (Million USD) and Growth Rate (2012-2017) Table Global Smart Grid Storage Technology Market Size (Million USD) Comparison by Applications (2012-2022) Figure Global Smart Grid Storage Technology Market Share by Application in 2016 Table Global Smart Grid Storage Technology Revenue (Million USD) by Players (2012-2017) Table Global Smart Grid Storage Technology Revenue Market Share (%) by Players (2012-2017) Figure Global Smart Grid Storage Technology Market Size Share by Players in 2015 Figure Global Smart Grid Storage Technology Market Size Share by Players in 2016 Table Altairnano Basic Information List Table Smart Grid Storage Technology Business Revenue of Altairnano (2012-2017) Figure Altairnano Smart Grid Storage Technology Business Revenue Growth Rate Figure Altairnano Smart Grid Storage Technology Business Revenue Market Share (%) (2012-2017) Table Beacon Power Basic Information List …Continued Global Smart Grid Data Analytics Market Size, Status and Forecast 2022 : This report studies the global Smart Grid Data Analytics market, analyzes and researches the Smart Grid Data Analytics development status and forecast in United States, EU, Japan, China, India and Southeast Asia. Global Smart Grid Technology Market Size, Status and Forecast 2022 : This report studies the global Smart Grid Technology market, analyzes and researches the Smart Grid Technology development status and forecast in United States, EU, Japan, China, India and Southeast Asia. About Us: Orbis Research (orbisresearch.com) is a single point aid for all your market research requirements. We have vast database of reports from the leading publishers and authors across the globe. We specialize in delivering customized reports as per the requirements of our clients. We have complete information about our publishers and hence are sure about the accuracy of the industries and verticals of their specialization. This helps our clients to map their needs and we produce the perfect required market research study for our clients. For more information, please visit http://www.orbisresearch.com


News Article | December 10, 2016
Site: www.bbc.co.uk

The world's largest cold energy storage plant is being commissioned at a site near Manchester. The cryogenic energy facility stores power from renewables or off-peak generation by chilling air into liquid form. When the liquid air warms up it expands and can drive a turbine to make electricity. The 5MW plant near Manchester can power up to 5,000 homes for around three hours. The company behind the scheme, Highview Power Storage, believes that the technology has great potential to be scaled up for long-term use with green energy sources. Electricity demand varies, influenced by factors like time of day and season. The National Grid is prepared for surges in demand, with power stations on stand-by ready to crank up the power. However, dealing with these peaks and troughs will become increasingly difficult as coal-fired power stations close down and more intermittent renewable energy like wind and solar comes online. In 2015 renewables provided almost a quarter of UK electricity. The intermittent nature of green sources has seen researchers focus on trying to improve energy storage. Pumped hydropower can provide large amounts of energy for long durations, and lithium-ion batteries can respond to demand in milliseconds making them ideal for portable electronic devices and electric vehicles. But hydropower depends on specific geographies as water has to be pumped uphill, and batteries currently cannot be scaled in a cost effective way to store energy for a town or city. "Our technology is a bit like a locatable version of a pumped hydro system. Anywhere that needs large scale long-duration storage, that might be to help integrate an offshore wind farm, a system like ours can help achieve that," Gareth Brett from Highview Power explained, during a visit to the Manchester cryogenic site. "5MW is a bit small for this technology; anything from 10MW and up is the sort of scale we're talking about. "We've already designed a plant that can do 200MW /1200MWh, that's enough to keep a city going for 6 hours." Cryogenic storage works by using renewable or off-peak electricity to cool air down to -190 degrees C, which turns it into a liquid. It's then stored in an insulated tank, similar to a large thermos flask. To release the stored energy, the liquid air is exposed to ambient conditions causing it to expand back into a gas. The volume increase is huge, about 700 times, which is used to drive a turbine to generate electricity. Highview Power's demonstrator plant is next to Pilsworth landfill gas generation site. The large insulated tanks sit across the road from a collection of gas engines. These engines burn methane gas produced from decomposing rubbish to generate electricity. The waste heat from this process is captured and used to increase the efficiency of the cryogenic process. Dr Sheridan Few, Research Associate at the Grantham Institute, Imperial College London, described a phenomenon unique to this technology. "There's the storage of the energy, and the generating of the energy. You can make use of waste cold and waste heat... because you're putting both electrical and thermal energy in, the amount of electrical energy you get out, can in some cases end up being more than the electrical energy you put in." Alongside the provision of energy storage, this technology can tackle the issues of waste heat which is a by-product of many industrial process. Waste cold, as an example, can be found at liquefied natural gas (LNG) terminals. While cryogenic storage may be one of the solutions to help the future supply of electricity, there are also new approaches to controlling demand. "One of the most current issues is understanding the demand side," Dr Jenifer Baxter, Head of Energy and Environment at the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, told the BBC. "We tend to just produce electricity to meet the demand. Once we understand demand, we will have more confidence in deploying technologies." Demand side response, the concept of adjusting usage in response to the available supply of electricity, could work easily alongside other innovations like cryogenic energy storage.


Morgan R.,University of Brighton | Nelmes S.,Highview Power Storage | Gibson E.,Highview Power Storage | Brett G.,Highview Power Storage
Applied Energy | Year: 2015

Energy storage is an important technology for balancing a low carbon power network. Liquid Air Energy Storage (LAES) is a class of thermo-electric energy storage that utilises a tank of liquid air as the energy storage media. The device is charged using an air liquefier and energy is recovered through a Rankine cycle using the stored liquid air as the working fluid. The cycle efficiency is greatly improved through the storage and recycling of thermal energy released during discharge and used to reduce the work required to liquefy air during charging. Analysis and results from the design and testing of novel LAES concept at pilot scale are presented. Fundamental analysis of the LAES cycle is first described to determine the theoretical cycle performance and in particular the value of cold recycle. The pilot plant is then described together with the results of a series of comprehensive technical and commercial trials. The paper concludes with a discussion on the future potential of LAES in particular the fit with the requirements for bulk energy storage and the transition of the LAES technology from pilot to commercial scale. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.


Morgan R.,University of Brighton | Nelmes S.,Highview Power Storage | Gibson E.,Highview Power Storage | Brett G.,Highview Power Storage
Proceedings of Institution of Civil Engineers: Energy | Year: 2015

Liquid air energy storage (LAES) is a class of thermo-electric energy storage that utilises cryogenic or liquid air as the storage medium. The system is charged using an air liquefier and energy is recovered through a Rankine cycle using the stored liquid air as the working fluid. The recovery, storage and recycling of cold thermal energy released during discharge more than double the overall energy efficiency of the cycle. The demand on a storage plant in a grid support application is expected to be irregular and intermittent in response to fluctuating supply from intermittent renewable generators. This will complicate the storage of thermal energy and will mean the energy flow rates in the thermal store will vary from cycle to cycle and the state of charge of the store will also vary. This paper presents an analysis of the LAES cycle. The material and configuration of the cold thermal store is discussed in particular with reference to scale and measures to mitigate losses due to the irregular and intermittent duty cycle. The paper concludes with capital and levelised cost analysis of a reference 20 MW/80MWh LAES plant and a comparison of the levelised cost with other storage technologies.


Brett G.,Highview Power Storage | Barnett M.,Highview Power Storage
EPJ Web of Conferences | Year: 2014

Liquid Air Energy Storage (LAES) provides large scale, long duration energy storage at the point of demand in the 5 MW/20 MWh to 100 MW/1,000 MWh range. LAES combines mature components from the industrial gas and electricity industries assembled in a novel process and is one of the few storage technologies that can be delivered at large scale, with no geographical constraints. The system uses no exotic materials or scarce resources and all major components have a proven lifetime of 25+ years. The system can also integrate low grade waste heat to increase power output. Founded in 2005, Highview Power Storage, is a UK based developer of LAES. The company has taken the concept from academic analysis, through laboratory testing, and in 2011 commissioned the world's first fully integrated system at pilot plant scale (300 kW/2.5 MWh) hosted at SSE's (Scottish & Southern Energy) 80 MW Biomass Plant in Greater London which was partly funded by a Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) grant. Highview is now working with commercial customers to deploy multi MW commercial reference plants in the UK and abroad. © Owned by the authors, published by EDP Sciences, 2014.


News Article | February 5, 2016
Site: www.theguardian.com

The setting is decidedly modest: a utility room in a red-brick house at the end of a cul-de-sac in Wales. But if the hype turns out to be right, this may be the starting point for an energy revolution in the UK. Householder Mark Kerr has become the first British owner of a Tesla Powerwall, a cutting-edge bit of kit that the makers say will provide a “missing link” in solar energy. Like many owners of solar panels, Kerr and his family have a basic problem. They tend to be out at work and school when the sun is shining and the 16 solar panels on the roof of their home in Cardiff are producing power. The excess they miss out on is fed into the grid and they make a return on it but it does not seem right that they do not get to use the power from their panels. However, from now, energy produced but not used during the day will charge the Powerwall and can then be used to provide them with the energy they need when they’re at home and their lights, music centres, computers, televisions and myriad other devices need feeding. A self-confessed tech-head and an electrician by trade, Kerr could hardly contain his excitement when the Powerwall arrived. “This is the future, definitely,” he said. “For me this is the logical next step. We have the solar panels but we need a way to make best use of the power they produce.” “Me and my family are all out in the day, and we are not making use of the enormous amount of clean energy that our solar panels produce. The battery will allow us to store the energy we don’t use in the day to use when we need it in the evenings.” There are other battery systems on the market, but since its launch in California last year by Tesla’s billionaire founder, Elon Musk, the Powerwall has gathered something of a cult following. Kerr is clearly a disciple: “It’s a gorgeous-looking piece of technology, its design is very sleek and minimalistic and something you can hang on the wall like a piece of art, definitely nothing like some of the other clunky looking batteries.” If Kerr’s partner, Lyndsey, finds him missing one evening, it sounds like she may find him gazing at his new gizmo. There is a growing school of thought that 2016 could be the year of energy storage. At one end of the scale are large schemes – such as Highview Power Storage project, due to start generating power next month by turning air to liquid and back again, driving a turbine in the process. At the other end of the scale is Kerr’s utility room. The 7kWh Powerwall is a lithium-ion-battery system invented by the company that has popularised electric sports cars. Not one to underplay his products, Tesla CEO Musk heralded the battery as “a fundamental transformation [in] how energy is delivered across the Earth”. A company called Solar Plants, based in Port Talbot, south Wales, has installed Kerr’s Powerwall. Its managing director, Oliver Farr, said it had e-mailed 3,000 customers about the device. Of the 1,500 who opened the e-mail, 600 said they wanted one. “There is a lifestyle element to it,” said Farr. “It’s like people who have an iPhone wanting an Apple Watch.” Kerr’s is a freebie. Farr said he wanted to check how it worked before he sold it to other customers. He is not putting a price on it yet either. At the launch event, Musk said it cost $3,500. But this does not take into account the cost of the switchgear needed to make it work, and installation costs. Some experts both in the UK and Australia have suggested it could be more than a decade - the length of warranty - before the Powerwall pays for itself. The number-crunchers will not put Kerr off. He believes that his solar panels have already reduced his electricity bills by 20% and thinks the addition of the Powerwall might lead to a total reduction of 80%. “But it’s not just about the money. We’re environmentally minded and this seems the right thing to do.”

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