High Point, NC, United States
High Point, NC, United States

High Point University is a private liberal arts university in High Point, North Carolina, U.S., affiliated with the United Methodist Church. Founded as High Point College in 1924, it became High Point University in October 1991. Wikipedia.


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News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

HIGH POINT, NC--(Marketwired - February 21, 2017) - Apple Co-founder and High Point University's Innovator in Residence Steve Wozniak returned to campus today for a series of micro sessions with students, faculty and members of the community that focused on a variety of topics. He began his visit with HPU pharmacy students. Teams of students took turns discussing ideas, including software and applications that streamline patient care. Pharmacy students also received advice from Wozniak on the journey from concept to implementation. "One thing I would say when you're going forward with a new idea, a startup idea, is you need different talents," said Wozniak. "You want people who want to be in business, who want to be there for a reason. Just make sure your personalities are alike. "It doesn't matter if your values are the same, or if you have the same political leanings, if your personalities are different and you approach things in different ways. So you've got to find a good team. When starting something up, you have to ask yourself, 'How happy are you with what you're doing?' and it almost always boils down to how much you like the people you're with." Wozniak also met with exercise science students in a similar session. His main message: "Do not limit your thinking to one narrow field." "You might come up with some very good ideas. Don't say that the answers are in a book. A lot of people take a test and come up with the same answer that's correct. And that's intelligent. But it's the same answer that everyone else has," said Wozniak. "My approach is to write your own book. Do something that has never been done before. Devote yourself to it." In the afternoon, Wozniak held a Growth Mindset Forum moderated by Dr. Jim Trammell, assistant professor of communication, and met with computer science students who he began mentoring last spring in their efforts to build an autonomous, self-driving vehicle. Together, the team and Wozniak focused on technical items such as vision sensors, hydraulics and GPS. Wozniak also encouraged them to reach out to successful organizations for collaboration and to stay focused on their mission. "Always keep your end goal in mind," Wozniak said. "When Steve Jobs and I started Apple, we had a goal to make people's lives easier. Ask yourself what is HPU about and what will help HPU be more of that? Your end goal is the most important thing; what will this mean to the people on your campus?" "Once again, the Woz never ceases to inspire us," said HPU student Kira Foglesong. "Today he brought insightful and creative ideas to the table to not only help us with the specific tasks we are currently working on but to also better manage the bigger picture and scope of our project. He encouraged us to always keep our end goal and purpose in mind and never fear being different. We should never be afraid to go out there and ask questions. We shouldn't be afraid to talk to professionals, companies or other leaders in the industries relevant to our project, because we will never know who might be willing to help unless we dare to try." At High Point University, every student receives an extraordinary education in an inspiring environment with caring people.® HPU, located in the Piedmont Triad region of North Carolina, is a liberal arts institution with more than 4,800 undergraduate and graduate students. It is ranked No. 1 by U.S. News and World Report for Best Regional Colleges in the South and No. 1 for Most Innovative Regional Colleges in the South. HPU was named the No. 4 private school in N.C. for the best return on investment, and it is a 2016-2017 College of Distinction. The university offers 48 undergraduate majors, 51 undergraduate minors and 13 graduate degree programs. It is a member of the NCAA, Division I and the Big South Conference. Visit High Point University on the Web at highpoint.edu. Image Available: http://www.marketwire.com/library/MwGo/2017/2/21/11G130863/Images/Woz_1-7c4724db582d952dbddb66cea1f426f1.jpg Image Available: http://www.marketwire.com/library/MwGo/2017/2/21/11G130863/Images/Woz_2-9465262b5e55a4bdaa979ca98a4025b3.jpg Image Available: http://www.marketwire.com/library/MwGo/2017/2/21/11G130863/Images/Woz_3-8e5c9e8fb35a942e9cf1e5a055e51e17.jpg Image Available: http://www.marketwire.com/library/MwGo/2017/2/21/11G130863/Images/Woz_4-eb34893d7356b4a5bdea24525896c5a6.jpg Image Available: http://www.marketwire.com/library/MwGo/2017/2/21/11G130863/Images/Woz_5-1b75785ec56caba9b2144f54c1008d94.jpg Image Available: http://www.marketwire.com/library/MwGo/2017/2/21/11G130863/Images/Woz_6-337bfb1d92a68d62aa626181b705b788.jpg


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

HIGH POINT, NC--(Marketwired - February 15, 2017) - Steve Wozniak, Apple co-founder and High Point University's Innovator in Residence, will return to campus on Feb. 20 to work with students in exercise science, pharmacy, computer science, education and other majors. The Silicon Valley icon joined HPU as Innovator in Residence in 2016. He also gave the university's Commencement address in 2013, and he has been interviewed by Dr. Nido Qubein, HPU president, in the university's "Access to Innovators" series. Wozniak's schedule is packed full of micro sessions with students and a Growth Mindset Forum, to be moderated by Dr. Jim Trammell, assistant professor of communication. "This event will give Steve Wozniak a chance to share his experience as both a student and as a teacher," says Trammell. "Wozniak's life exemplifies Growth Mindset. He never rested on the fact that he was naturally good at something and consistently pushed himself to get better. And, his focus is not merely on creating 'cool' things, but on making things that will make life better for others. There is a deep human-focus in his work, and that message can help motivate faculty to consider how to infuse the virtues of character and citizenship in our classes." Pharmacy students will discuss with Wozniak the creative journey from concept to implementation as it relates to innovation in drug therapy. Computer science students will update Wozniak on "The Woz Project" they began with him a year ago -- building a mobile, driverless kiosk to make deliveries across campus. "The energy Woz brings to the table is infectious," says Kira Foglesong. "When we get bogged down by the thought that we're just students and we might be in over our heads, only a few words from our mentor instantly recharge our efforts and inspire us to face our challenge with innovation, creativity, and most importantly, fun. "His excitement and passion ignite our own and push us to accomplish even greater things than we originally thought possible. We believe in ourselves more because we know he believes in us. We don't want to let him down, and because we have him as our mentor, we won't." "They say to put 10,000 hours in to get good at something. That'll never fail you," Wozniak said during a campus visit in 2016. "Just work on your own favorite things for a long time, and you'll get better and better at it than anyone else. Don't let anything stop you or hold you down. Don't give up what you love." Students will also have a chance to meet Wozniak for photos and autographs during an open session at the conclusion of his visit. At High Point University, every student receives an extraordinary education in an inspiring environment with caring people.® HPU, located in the Piedmont Triad region of North Carolina, is a liberal arts institution with more than 4,800 undergraduate and graduate students. It is ranked No. 1 by U.S. News and World Report for Best Regional Colleges in the South and No. 1 for Most Innovative Regional Colleges in the South. HPU was named the No. 4 private school in N.C. for the best return on investment, and it is a 2016-2017 College of Distinction. The university offers 48 undergraduate majors, 51 undergraduate minors and 13 graduate degree programs. It is a member of the NCAA, Division I and the Big South Conference. Visit High Point University on the Web at highpoint.edu. Image Available: http://www.marketwire.com/library/MwGo/2017/2/14/11G130278/Images/Woz_1-180aea33f259a7758037230becad674a.jpg Image Available: http://www.marketwire.com/library/MwGo/2017/2/14/11G130278/Images/Woz_2-b4a0c059a377a04fa599d3d4489f29ab.jpg Image Available: http://www.marketwire.com/library/MwGo/2017/2/14/11G130278/Images/Woz_3-6d0e89b027f9b25683f03544945379ea.jpg Image Available: http://www.marketwire.com/library/MwGo/2017/2/14/11G130278/Images/Woz_4-7ee54f80434180bfa71a3c3bc0d4de8e.jpg


ATLANTA--A person's sex and running ability play a role in the decline of their performance in marathons as they get older, according to a Georgia State University study. "We found that marathon performance decline begins at about 35 years old," said Dr. Gerald Zavorsky, lead author of the study and associate professor in the Department of Respiratory Therapy at Georgia State. "For top runners, we determined the slowdown is about two minutes per year beginning at age 35 for men, and for women, it's actually a little bit statistically faster of a slowdown, around two minutes and 30 seconds per year beginning at the age of 35." "If you're an average runner finishing in the middle of your age group, statistically the slowdown starts at age 50. It's similar if you're a man or woman. The decline with aging in average runners is around two minutes and 45 seconds per year beginning at age 50." The study also found that runners between 25 to 34 years old had the fastest times, with overall champion males at 28.3 years old and overall champion females at 30.8 years old. The rate of decline from 35 to 74 years old is roughly linear with female age group winners demonstrating a 27-second per year greater decline compared to male age group winners. The results are published in the journal PLOS ONE. The researchers examined data from 2001 to 2016 for three of the largest marathons in the United States - Boston, New York City and Chicago - to look at differences in the age of slowdown for men and women. They also determined if there are age-related differences in decline between elite runners (those who finish at the top of their age group) versus average runners (those who finish in the middle of their age group). The runners were between 16 and 74 years old. Marathon running is one of the most popular sporting events in North America. At least 500,000 runners compete in marathons each year. This is the first study to examine more than a decade of age-group winners and median finishers from multiple marathons. Zavorsky believes the 15-year difference in age-related slowdown for elite runners versus average runners occurs because some people don't realize their running potential and don't start running until later in life. "Elite athletes realize their potential when they're young, and they're able to maximize that potential when they're young," Zavorsky said. "But average runners might not realize their potential until they're a lot older and by that time physiological aging comes in. They try to reach their maximum potential, but they're trying to reach it at a much older age and their ceiling for improvement is not as high." He also thinks the world champion males are a little younger than the world champion females because of circumstance, not necessarily physiological differences. Women might take time off from running to deliver a child and then start back up again, Zavorsky said. The study's findings aren't intended to discourage older runners, he said. "If you're an older person and you want to pick up marathon running, yes you can still improve because you've just now begun running," Zavorsky said. "There's always room for improvement, but physiologically, you were probably at your prime somewhere between 25 and 34 years old. But people who are older can still train to achieve personal goals and get the health benefits of exercise, such as lower blood pressure, lower blood cholesterol and enhanced psychological well-being." While complete 2001-2016 data weren't available from the three marathons, the researchers are confident that examining three marathons over several years provides enough data to give a careful analysis. Co-authors of the study include Kelly Tomko, a former Georgia State student now at the University of Bridgeport in Connecticut, and Dr. James Smoliga of High Point University in North Carolina.


Objective: To examine the effect of 109 days of caprylic triglyceride (CT) in a 70-year-old male with mild Alzheimer's disease (AD). Background: Cerebral metabolism is limited to glucose under most conditions, and diminished cerebral glucose metabolism is a characteristic feature of AD. Another substrate available for cerebral metabolism is ketone bodies. Ketone bodies (KB) are normally derived from fat stores under conditions of low glucose availability as an alternative energy substrate to glucose. KB can also be produced by oral administration of CT. Prior studies suggest that the alternative energy source of CT may improve cognitive function due to mild to moderate AD, by circumventing the diminished glucose metabolism. Method: The effect of CT was analyzed in a single-case of mild AD with cognitive alterations in an open label study. Study outcomes included the Montreal cognitive assessment (MoCA), mini mental state exam (MMSE), and 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F) positron emission tomography (FDG PET) scans. Results: After 109 days of CT, MoCA scores changed from a baseline value of 24-28, and MMSE scores changed from 23 to 28. No changes were observed on FDG PET scans. Conclusion: The results suggest that, in a case of mild AD, CT may have affected cognitive function, assessed by means of MMSE and MoCA, although glucose uptake and metabolism remained unchanged.


To update our previously published systematic review and meta-analysis by subjecting the literature on shoulder physical examination (ShPE) to careful analysis in order to determine each tests clinical utility. This review is an update of previous work, therefore the terms in the Medline and CINAHL search strategies remained the same with the exception that the search was confined to the dates November, 2006 through to February, 2012. The previous study dates were 1966 - October, 2006. Further, the original search was expanded, without date restrictions, to include two new databases: EMBASE and the Cochrane Library. The Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies, version 2 (QUADAS 2) tool was used to critique the quality of each new paper. Where appropriate, data from the prior review and this review were combined to perform meta-analysis using the updated hierarchical summary receiver operating characteristic and bivariate models. Since the publication of the 2008 review, 32 additional studies were identified and critiqued. For subacromial impingement, the meta-analysis revealed that the pooled sensitivity and specificity for the Neer test was 72% and 60%, respectively, for the Hawkins-Kennedy test was 79% and 59%, respectively, and for the painful arc was 53% and 76%, respectively. Also from the meta-analysis, regarding superior labral anterior to posterior (SLAP) tears, the test with the best sensitivity (52%) was the relocation test; the test with the best specificity (95%) was Yergason's test; and the test with the best positive likelihood ratio (2.81) was the compression-rotation test. Regarding new (to this series of reviews) ShPE tests, where meta-analysis was not possible because of lack of sufficient studies or heterogeneity between studies, there are some individual tests that warrant further investigation. A highly specific test (specificity >80%, LR+ ≥ 5.0) from a low bias study is the passive distraction test for a SLAP lesion. This test may rule in a SLAP lesion when positive. A sensitive test (sensitivity >80%, LR- ≤ 0.20) of note is the shoulder shrug sign, for stiffness-related disorders (osteoarthritis and adhesive capsulitis) as well as rotator cuff tendinopathy. There are six additional tests with higher sensitivities, specificities, or both but caution is urged since all of these tests have been studied only once and more than one ShPE test (ie, active compression, biceps load II) has been introduced with great diagnostic statistics only to have further research fail to replicate the results of the original authors. The belly-off and modified belly press tests for subscapularis tendinopathy, bony apprehension test for bony instability, olecranon-manubrium percussion test for bony abnormality, passive compression for a SLAP lesion, and the lateral Jobe test for rotator cuff tear give reason for optimism since they demonstrated both high sensitivities and specificities reported in low bias studies. Finally, one additional test was studied in two separate papers. The dynamic labral shear may be sensitive for SLAP lesions but, when modified, be diagnostic of labral tears generally. Based on data from the original 2008 review and this update, the use of any single ShPE test to make a pathognomonic diagnosis cannot be unequivocally recommended. There exist some promising tests but their properties must be confirmed in more than one study. Combinations of ShPE tests provide better accuracy, but marginally so. These findings seem to provide support for stressing a comprehensive clinical examination including history and physical examination. However, there is a great need for large, prospective, well-designed studies that examine the diagnostic accuracy of the many aspects of the clinical examination and what combinations of these aspects are useful in differentially diagnosing pathologies of the shoulder.


Special W.P.,High Point University | Li-Barber K.T.,High Point University
Computers in Human Behavior | Year: 2012

The purpose of the current study was to extend existing research examining the specific motives for creating and maintaining Facebook, and to connect these motives to users' levels of self-disclosure and satisfaction with Facebook. Undergraduate students identified their reasons for using Facebook, privacy and self-disclosure settings, and satisfaction with Facebook's ability to meet these motivational needs. Results indicated that the most common motives for using Facebook were relationship maintenance, passing time, and entertainment, although gender differences in motives for creating a Facebook page were observed. Males and females also differed in the overall level of self-disclosure as well as the type of information presented on their Facebook pages. Levels of self-disclosure, but not privacy levels, were associated with greater levels of satisfaction with Facebook to meet certain motivational goals. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: POLITICAL SCIENCE | Award Amount: 52.44K | Year: 2016

General Summary

Electoral campaigns are a defining feature of democratic polities. Yet studying electoral campaigns and their effects has been difficult. With the support of prior National Science Foundation grants, the investigators have developed a theory of campaign communication and tested expectations using data from congressional campaign and members official websites. The investigators extend their data collection to include the 2016 campaign and the 2015 and 2017 legislative sessions. A key component of the project is that it brings together campaign and legislative data. The PIs construct a publicly available dataset that includes coding of approximately 3,000 House and Senate campaign websites and roughly 300 official congressional websites, over sixteen points in time. These data include extensive information on candidates backgrounds, districts, and campaigns, as well as data on television advertisements and media coverage. Extending the data is critical for further understanding how the publics growing technological sophistication affects what candidates and representatives present online. This project also provides opportunities to study campaigns and their effects on legislation and representation.

Technical Summary

Electoral campaigns are a defining feature of democratic polities. Yet studying electoral campaigns and their effects has been difficult. In recent work, the investigators have developed a theory of campaign communication and tested expectations using data from congressional campaign websites and members official websites. The investigators have amassed a data set consisting of more than 2,500 website codings, from 2002 through 2014. These data have been used in scholarly projects by the PIs and many other political science investigators. The PIs will extend their data collection to include the 2016 campaign and the 2015 and 2017 legislative sessions. They will code sites over the course of the campaign, archive sites, implement surveys of campaign and official website designers, and code official member websites approximately one year after the campaigns. A major broader impact of the project is that the team of coders include only undergraduate students. These students gain valuable experience with empirical social science research. In the end, the investigators will construct a publicly available data set that includes coding of more than 3,000 web sites over multiple years. This project provides opportunities to study campaigns and their effects on legislation and representation.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: Integrative Ecologi Physiology | Award Amount: 207.84K | Year: 2011

Potential changes in cloud patterns due to global warming are of critical importance because of their strong influence on sunlight, temperature, and precipitation experienced by plant communities. Plants are especially sensitive to changes in cloud cover because sunlight, temperature, and water availability are important factors driving photosynthetic carbon gain, growth, reproduction, and spatial distribution patterns. The most dramatic response to changes in cloud patterns are projected for plant communities currently characterized by frequent cloud cover (e.g. mountain cloud forests, temperate and tropical rainforests). The purpose of this project is to use field measurements of photosynthesis, water stress, leaf temperature, and growth of native tree species in the Southern Appalachians Mountains (eastern US) and the Rocky Mountains (western US) under a range of naturally-occurring cloud regimes. From these data, a model will be developed that predicts long term effects of changing cloud-cover patterns on future growth and survival. These forest ecosystems represent two common types of mountain cloud regimes found across the globe?morning cloud-immersion and afternoon broken clouds, respectively. These forest tree species are physiologically adapted to their current climactic conditions, and it is anticipated that predicted changes in cloud cover may result in increased water, sunlight, and leaf temperature stress, leading ultimately to geographic and altitudinal migration, and/or extinction. Loss or decline of these high-mountain forests would have major impacts on such important features as timber production, snow accumulation, and corresponding water supply for agricultural and municipal use. This project will involve a collaborative effort between a university with a strong graduate program (Wake Forest University) and a local liberal arts college lacking the facilities and equipment to facilitate undergraduate research (High Point University). Three undergraduates from HPU (from underrepresented groups in science) have committed to the project and are highly motivated to become graduate students.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY | Award Amount: 89.57K | Year: 2016

Research in the social sciences has shown that effective urban policy must strike a delicate balance between social, economic, and environmental considerations. In a world where over half of the worlds population now lives in cities, finding this balance is crucial because poor urban planning and management may have costly consequences in economic growth, public health, general well-being, and environmental quality. In recent years, a number of American cities have exhibited the effects of infrastructural failures: flagging economic investment, social unrest, and disease outbreaks. But while the effects are clear, the solutions are not. In the research supported by this award, anthropologists Dr. Joshua B. Fisher (High Point University) and Dr. Alex Nading (University of Edinburgh) will address the problem through innovative research in an urban context whose history of experimentation with policy alternatives and relatively small size, will be particularly revealing of what works, what does not, for whom, and why.

The researchers will travel to Ciudad Sandino, a section of peri-urban Managua, Nicaragua. Recently, in response to increased income inequality, urban environmental degradation, and declining revenues from tourism and foreign investment, the city has undertaken a new, cross-sector, integrated urban development campaign, Live Clean, Live Healthy, Live Beautiful, Live Well. The researchers will examine the complex impacts of this program upon matters of waste management, environmental education, food safety, and public health. They will collect data with a suite of ethnographic research methods including ethnographic interviews, participant observation, photo documentation, and archival analysis. In addition to these more traditional research methods, the researchers will also collect data interactively and dynamically by creating and following a longitudinal ethnographic cohort. Through a series of workshops over three years, a diverse array of citizens including policy-makers, teachers, and informal economy food producers and garbage pickers will be asked to provide feedback to each other and to the researchers on how the programs are affecting them and their worlds. Findings from this research will provide insight into the factors that shape the development of effective urban social policy and successful cities, given their many entangled social, economic, and environmental dimensions.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: POLITICAL SCIENCE | Award Amount: 17.58K | Year: 2012

Electoral campaigns are a defining feature of democratic polities. Yet studying electoral campaigns and their effects has been difficult. In recent work, the investigators have developed a theory of campaign communication and tested expectations using data from campaigns and members official websites.

With the support of two collaborative National Science Foundation grants (SES-0822819, SES-0822782, and SES-1024079, SES-1023291, SES-1022902), the investigators have amassed a data set consisting of more than 1,500 website codings, from 2002 through 2010. These data offer unprecedented opportunities to study campaigns and their effects. The investigators will extend their data collection to include the 2012 campaign and the 2011 and 2013 legislative sessions. They will code sites over the course of the campaign, archive sites, implement a survey of website designers, and code official member websites approximately one year after the campaigns. They also will solicit input on the coding scheme to include features that interest other scholars who can then use the data for their own research.

Extending the data to include the 2012 election (and the 2011 and 2013 legislative sessions) is critical for various reasons: partisanship differs from what it has been in past years of the project; the infusion of new members of Congress in 2012 raises intriguing questions about path dependency and the power of parties in affecting behaviors of those who ran untraditional campaigns; and the increasingly technological expectations of the public may stimulate an increase in what has been rudimentary technical usage on websites. In the end, the investigators will construct a publicly available data set that includes coding of approximately 1,900 campaign websites and roughly 300 official member websites, over twelve points in time.

The project has clear intellectual merit. The data will enable scholars to track the evolution of the Internet over time and test theories of campaigns and representation. Unlike other unmediated sources of campaign communication, such as television advertisements and debates, virtually all candidates launch campaign websites and all representatives have official websites. This allows for analyses on a representative sample of candidates and members, rather than a biased sample. Websites also enable politicians to present a holistic picture of their behaviors rather than short sound bites or selected roll call votes. The project also produces broader impacts. Insights generated from these data could improve campaigns and representation. The project will involve students who will learn how to conduct research and be able to use the data in their own work. In the end, the project uniquely brings together data on three key components of democratic polities: campaigns, voting, and representation.

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