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Alexandria, Egypt

Elansary H.O.,University of Guelph | Elansary H.O.,Alexandria University | Mahmoud E.A.,University of Guelph | Mahmoud E.A.,High Institute of Tourism
Natural Product Research | Year: 2015

The total phenolic, flavonoid and tannin contents in leaves extracts of Ocimum basilicum (OB) (Lamiaceae) international cultivars, as well as their overall antioxidant activities using DPPH and linoleic acid assays, were investigated. Furthermore, the antiproliferative and cytotoxic activities against line HeLa, MCF-7, Jurkat, HT-29, T24, MIAPaCa-2 cancer cells and one normal human cell line HEK-293 were examined. DPPH and linoleic acid assays ranged from 75.8% to 93.3% and from 74.5% to 97.1%; respectively. O. b. 'purple ruffle', O. b. 'dark opale', O. b. 'genovese', O. b. 'anise', O. b. 'bush green' and O. b. L. (OBL) varied in their antiproliferative and cytotoxic activities, influenced cell cycle progression and stimulated apoptosis in most cancer cells. OBL exhibited the highest antioxidant and antiproliferative activities. OB extracts not only improve taste but also have certain anticancer activity against diverse cancer cells due to the presence of compounds such as rosmarinic acid, chicoric acid and caftaric acid. Thus, OB represents a potent source of anticancer materials. © 2015 Taylor & Francis. Source


Elansary H.O.,University of Guelph | Elansary H.O.,Alexandria University | Mahmoud E.A.,University of Guelph | Mahmoud E.A.,High Institute of Tourism
Natural Product Research | Year: 2014

The antioxidant, antiproliferative and cytotoxic activities against different human cancer cells were investigated in local and recently introduced plants of Mentha sp., Rosmarinus officinalis L. (ROL) and Origanum majorana L. (OML). ROL exhibited the highest antioxidant activities (IC50 8.4 ± 0.2 μg/mL) followed by OML and mint species such as Mentha suaveolens 'apple mint' and Mentha longifolia L. exhibiting moderate antioxidant activities. HPLC analysis of leaf extract revealed that rosmarinic acid is the main component followed by caffeic acid. Herbal leaf extracts varied in their proliferation inhibition and cytotoxicity against HeLa, MCF-7 and Jurkat cancer cells in a dose-dependent matter. The highest antiproliferative inhibition and cytotoxic activity were detected in ROL and OML followed by mint. Local herbs might have a potential role as anticancer natural medicines in addition to their high antioxidant activities due to the presence of different phenolics in their aqueous tea extracts. © 2014 © 2014 Taylor & Francis. Source


Salem M.Z.M.,Alexandria University | Zidan Y.E.,Cairo University | El Hadidi N.M.N.,Cairo University | Mansour M.M.A.,Cairo University | Abo Elgat W.A.A.,High Institute of Tourism
International Biodeterioration and Biodegradation | Year: 2016

Natural extracts have become of high interest in the past ten years for their inhibiting the growth of molds over wood and wood products surfaces in service or during the storage of building materials. In the present study, the antifungal effects of three natural extracts applied to three woods against five common molds were assessed. The growth of fungal hyphae of Alternaria alternata, Fusarium subglutinans, Chaetomium globosum, Aspergillus niger, and Trichoderma viride on the surfaces of Pinus sylvestris, Pinus rigida and Fagus sylvatica woods treated with extracts of Pinus rigida (heartwood), Eucalyptus camaldulensis (leaves) and Costus speciosus (rhizomes) was visually estimated. GC/MS and FTIR analyses were used to identify the chemical constituents and the functional groups of extracts. α-terpineol (24.91%), borneol (10.95%), terpin hydrate (9.60%), D-fenchyl alcohol (5.99%), and limonene glycol (5.05%), which are the main constituents of P. rigida heartwood methanol extract. The main chemical compounds of methanol extract from Eucalyptus camaldulensis leaves were spathulenol (18.89%), cryptone (5.79%), 4,6,6-trimethyl-2-(3-methylbuta-1,3-dienyl)-3-oxatricyclo[5.1.0.0(2,4)]octane (5.79%), (3,3-dimethylcyclohexylidene)-(E)-acetaldehyde (5.57%), and ascaridole (4.32%). The main constituents identified in the distilled water extract from Costus speciosus rhizomes were meso-erythritol (12.21%), methyl-2-methyl-1,3-oxothiolan-2-yl-ketone (11.61%), (all-Z)-5,8,11,14,17-eicosapentaenoic acid-methyl ester (9.74%), diosgenin (5.07%), 2-ethyl-3-hydroxy-4H-pyran-4-one (4.43%), 3',4',7-trimethylquercetin (3.17%), and digitoxin (2.77%). Wood specimens treated at the level of 2% concentration of P. rigida heartwood extract observed good inhibition to the mold growth under laboratory conditions. These findings support the potential use of natural extracts for natural wood protection against mold infestation for surface treatment of wood. The results indicate that wood extracts may be useful for reducing the incidence of mold on wood products, but none of the materials evaluated completely inhibited the test fungi. These extracts may provide a useful value-added application for by-products of lumber production from these species. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Salem M.Z.M.,Alexandria University | Zidan Y.E.,Cairo University | Mansour M.M.A.,Cairo University | El Hadidi N.M.N.,Cairo University | Abo Elgat W.A.A.,High Institute of Tourism
International Biodeterioration and Biodegradation | Year: 2016

In the past ten years natural extracts have been used as important potential applications to prevent mold growth on in-service wood. The growth of fungal hyphae of five common mold fungi (Alternaria alternata, Fusarium subglutinans, Chaetomium globosum, Aspergillus niger, and Trichoderma viride) on wood surface of Pinus sylvestris, Pinus rigida and Fagus sylvatica treated with the essential oil (EO) of P. rigida (wood) and Eucalyptus camaldulensis (leaves) was visually estimated. EOs were applied by vapor method and the mold growth inhibition was measured. The chemical constituents of the EOs was analyzed by GC/MS, which referred to the presence of α-terpineol (34.49%), borneol (17.57%), and fenchyl alcohol (14.20%) as the major components in P. rigida wood oil, and eucalyptol (60.32%), α-pinene (13.65%), and γ-terpinene (8.77%) in E. camaldulensis leaves. Complete inhibition against the growth of A. alternata, F. subglutinans, C. globosum, and A. niger except of T. viride by applying P. rigida wood EO at 5000 ppm and complete growth with all the studied fungi except of C. globosum at 156.25 ppm was found. Good inhibitions against C. globosum at 5000 ppm and 156.25 ppm and no inhibition against A. niger and T. viride and little inhibition against F. subglutinans at high concentration was found by the application of EO from E. camaldulensis leaves. These findings support the potential use of the EOs for wood protection against mold infestation for surface-treatment or fumigation of wood products. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Elansary H.O.,University of Guelph | Elansary H.O.,Alexandria University | Mahmoud E.A.,University of Guelph | Mahmoud E.A.,High Institute of Tourism
Journal of Essential Oil Research | Year: 2015

Ocimum sp. taxonomy and nomenclature are in a state of confusion; thus species and cultivar identification are hampered by the large number of species belonging to this genus. In this study, we examined DNA barcoding and leaf essential oil (EO) composition methods for cultivar identification of local and recently introduced Ocimum sp. Both barcodes of rbcLa and matK were sequenced for each species in parallel with leaf EO composition analyses using gas chromatography and GC-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) of five Ocimum basilicum cultivars. Antioxidant activities for the EO were determined using 2,2′-diphenypicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and β-carotene-linoleic acid assays. The main EO constituents were methyl cinnamate (43.8%) in O. basilicum L., chavicol methyl ether (39.1% and 32.3%) in O. basilicum purple ruffle and anise; respectively, and linalool (30.9% and 30.6%) in O. basilicum Genovese and bush green, respectively. All cultivars were classified into chemotypes easily using their EOs when compared with barcoding using core barcodes, which exhibited no variation among all species in both markers except for Ocimum americanum, varying in a single base pair in matK. We concluded that chemotyping performed better than barcoding in species and cultivar identification, and the search for a better barcodes should continue. © 2014 © 2014 Taylor & Francis. Source

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