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Dhyani A.,High Altitude Plant Physiology Research Center | Nautiyal B.P.,Mizoram University | Nautiyal M.C.,High Altitude Plant Physiology Research Center
International Journal of Biodiversity Science, Ecosystems Services and Management | Year: 2010

This study documents the medicinal uses of Astavarga, a group of eight medicinal herbs, used in traditional medical knowledge (TMK) of the Himalaya region and in the traditional medical system (TMS) in India. Field surveys were conducted during 2006-2008 to collect data on the availability and uses of Astavarga across 21 diverse localities. During the surveys, information was collected on types of ailments treated and plant parts used in different therapies in TMK using semi-structured questionnaires. Overall, information was gathered from 92 informants in the study area. These herbs are mostly used to treat sexual problems, physical disability, respiratory problems, different types of pain, fever and urinary problems, as well as anti-ageing agents. Information on medicinal properties of these plants was also collected from secondary sources, i.e. the traditional medical system (Ayurveda) and through a literature survey. This revealed that Astavarga in TMS is mostly used to treat sexual disorders, physical weakness, to strengthen the immune system, body pain and as a tonic. Analysis of TMK in the Himalaya reveals some new medicinal properties of Astavarga while the literature survey indicates that some of the plants, viz. Habenaria and Malaxis species, are not explored so far for their chemical constituents and biological activity. New medicinal uses, as recorded by this study, will provide insights for further investigation of pharmacology and phytochemical constituents of these species. © 2010 Taylor & Francis.


Dhyani A.,High Altitude Plant Physiology Research Center | Nautiyal B.P.,Mizoram University | Nautiyal M.C.,High Altitude Plant Physiology Research Center | Rivera M.C.,University of Buenos Aires | And 2 more authors.
Phyton | Year: 2012

Lilium polyphyllum is a critically endangered herb in the wilds of Uttarakhand, India. Gray mold appeared as a new disease on this species from July to August (2008-2009) causing death of inflorescences and shoots. Botrytis cinerea was consistently isolated on PDA, from infected inflorescences. Pathogenicity was established by inoculation of potted plants of L. polyphyllum in a glasshouse. Botrytis cinerea was recorded as a gray mold pathogen on L. polyphyllum for the first time in India, causing flower and shoot blight. This disease may seriously affect reproductive stages of this endangered host. To our knowledge, B. cinerea had not been reported previously on L. polyphyllum.


Dhyani A.,High Altitude Plant Physiology Research Center | Dhyani A.,Mekelle University | Sharma G.,High Altitude Plant Physiology Research Center | Nautiyal B.P.,Mizoram University | Nautiyal M.C.,High Altitude Plant Physiology Research Center
Journal of Applied Research on Medicinal and Aromatic Plants | Year: 2014

In the present study conventional and in vitro propagation protocols have been developed for Lilium polyphyllum D. Don ex Royle. Sodium hypochlorite (4%) treatment improves seed germination (82. ±. 7.64%). For vegetative propagation, IBA 100. ppm treatment produced 3. ±. 1.07 bulblets/scale. We achieved multi-bulblet formation through in vitro seed germination and callus culture using bulb scales on MS medium. The study reports 91% in vitro germination using chipped seed, treated with IBA 100. ppm within 14-18 days of inoculation. This is the first report of germination >90% within <20 days in the genus Lilium having hypogeal germination. After 18 days of germination, the in vitro seedlings showed multi-bulblet structures. Bulb scales maximum callusing (69. ±. 6.94%) and bulblet formation (1.7. ±. 0.18 bulblets/scale) were observed in MS medium supplemented with IBA 25. μM. Bulblet formation was observed after four weeks following two sub-cultures on the same medium. Later individual bulblets were hardened with >40% survival after a year. The study can serve as a tool of mass multiplication for in situ and ex situ conservation of the species. © 2014 Elsevier GmbH.


Dhyani A.,High Altitude Plant Physiology Research Center | Nautiyal M.C.,High Altitude Plant Physiology Research Center | Nautiyal B.P.,Mizoram University
Acta Horticulturae | Year: 2010

Phenological progression in Lilium polyphyllum was observed under two climatically different natural habitats i.e. temperate and high altitude. In nature, radicle emergence was observed after 75 days of sowing at 17-19°C soil and air temperatures. A bulblet was developed after 25 days of germination in July, but emergence of first true leaf was delayed until the next year, 277 days after germination. This juvenile phase continued with development of aerial parts as well as bulb and remained for more than 4 years. The juvenile phase was followed by virginal phase during which an aboveground shoot without flower was produced annually for 3-4 years, after which the reproductive phase began. The flowering period lasts for 15-20 days and was at peak when air and soil temperatures ranged from 11-19°C and 15-17°C, respectively in both regions. Initiation of flowering was earlier in the temperate than in the high altitude site. Seed setting was initiated during August and continued for 2 months to mature. There onwards, seed dispersal was occurred until mid-November. Underground bulb also showed marked variation in size, number of scales and roots during different phenophases. Since phenophases are the best indicators of plant responses to the environment, seasonal timing of events can be critical for survival of life and reproduction.


Dhyani A.,High Altitude Plant Physiology Research Center | Phartyal S.S.,Hemwati Nandan Bahuguna Garhwal University | Nautiyal B.P.,Mizoram University | Nautiyal M.C.,High Altitude Plant Physiology Research Center
Journal of Biosciences | Year: 2013

Dormancy-breaking and seed germination studies in genus Lilium reveal that the majority of Lilium spp. studied have an underdeveloped embryo at maturity, which grows inside the seed before the radicle emerges. Additionally, the embryo, radicle or cotyledon has a physiological component of dormancy; thus, Lilium seeds have morphophysiological dormancy (MPD). A previous study suggested that seeds of Lilium polyphyllum have MPD but the study did not investigate the development of the embryo, which is one of the main criteria to determine MPD in seeds. To test this hypothesis, we investigated embryo growth and emergence of radicles and epicotyls in seeds over a range of temperatures. At maturity, seeds had underdeveloped embryos which developed fully at warm temperature within 6 weeks. Immediately after embryo growth, radicles also emerged at warm temperatures. However, epicotyls failed to emerge soon after radicle emergence. Epicotyls emerged from >90% seeds with an emerged radicle only after they were subjected to 2 weeks of cold moist stratification. The overall temperature requirements for dormancy-breaking and seed germination indicate a non-deep simple epicotyl MPD in L. polyphyllum. © 2012 Indian Academy of Sciences.


Dhyani A.,High Altitude Plant Physiology Research Center | Nautiyal B.P.,Mizoram University | Nautiyal M.C.,High Altitude Plant Physiology Research Center
Nordic Journal of Botany | Year: 2012

This study aims to determine the age of individual plants of the perennial herb Lilium polyphyllum in its natural habitats. Plant age was successfully estimated as the number of years a seed takes to produce the first stem plus the number of remnants of old shoots visible on the basal plates of the bulbs. Plant age as well as morphological features of shoots and bulbs were recorded at one temperate and one high altitude site. There were significant differences between the sites with respect to plant height, leaf number, bulb diameter and weight. The results show that individuals of similar age differ in morphology between temperate and high altitude sites. At both sites, all flowering plants of L. polyphyllum were 10-12 years old. © 2012 The Authors. Nordic Journal of Botany © 2012 Nordic Society Oikos.

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