Berlin, Germany
Berlin, Germany

The Hertie School of Governance is a German private university in Berlin's area of Quartier 110 of Friedrichstraße. Half of the students in the Hertie School come from abroad, and the working language is English.Predominantly, Hertie's students have backgrounds in law, economics, political science and international relations. The school offers to its students the opportunity to complete a "professional year" at a multinational corporation, government ministry or an international organization. In addition to this possibility, research collaboration with faculty is encouraged.Hertie students who are also admitted at a partner university, such as the London School of Economics, Columbia University, Institut d’études politiques de Paris, University of Tokyo and Bocconi University can spend their second year in these institutions and earn an additional masters degree in International Relations or Public Policy. Wikipedia.


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Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SSH.2012.3.2-3 | Award Amount: 3.17M | Year: 2013

The LIPSE project (Learning from Innovation in Public Sector Environments) identifies drivers and barriers to successful social innovation in the public sector. Through studying social innovation and co-creation practices and processes in 11 European countries and 7 policy sectors, LIPSE will create and disseminate essential knowledge about public innovation. The LIPSE consortium consists of leading institutions in 11 European countries. Seven empirical cross-national work packages will collect new insights on five building blocks of social innovation in the public sector: 1. Innovation environments 2. Innovation inputs 3. Innovation tools and processes 4. Innovation outcomes, diffusion and upscaling 5. Feedback loops in innovative systems The project will firstly map institutional environments to study the role of social capital, innovation champions and leadership, using survey research and social network analysis. The project will then look at citizens inputs into public innovation processes through participation, complaints and co-creation. This will be achieved by a) analysing secondary administrative datasets from ombudsmen and national audit offices b) case studies in social and welfare services and urban and rural regeneration and c) large scale survey research. It will then examine the use of risk management in innovation processes. A work package on innovation diffusion and adoption will assess what factors contribute to the successful upscaling of ICT-driven social innovations, with a focus on teleworking (as a new way of working) and e-procurement. Finally, the project will develop a comprehensive set of public sector social innovation indicators and explore future trends in social innovation through scenario-mapping with academic and practitioner experts. The dissemination of knowledge will be widespread, using websites, articles, books, road shows and conferences across Europe.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SSH-2009-5.1.1. | Award Amount: 3.31M | Year: 2010

Free and independent media are vital for the workings of democratic systems. Media structures which are free of interference from government, business or other social groups, and in which access of diverse views and opinions is effectively guaranteed, support democratic debate and sustain citizens active involvement in political and civic life. Given the strong interconnection between politics, business and the media, the creation and safeguarding of an environment supportive of media freedom and independence remain everywhere in Europe a continuous and open-ended process. In view of the important role the media play in providing information about the economy and political affairs, political and economic actors, but also socio-cultural elites regularly seek to exert an influence on domestic media policy-making. MEDIADEM seeks to understand and explain the factors that promote (or conversely hinder) the development of policies for free and independent media. The project will combine a country-based study in Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Germany, Greece, Italy, Romania, Slovakia, Spain, Turkey and the UK with a comparative analysis across media sectors and types of media services, and will investigate the complex array of policy approaches and regulatory and self-regulatory practices established to safeguard media freedom and independence. In order to verify whether regulatory measures actually advance a more democratic political order through the diversification of media outlets, sources and content, the project will place them in their proper socio-political, economic and cultural context, and will examine how state and non-state perceptions about the role the media should play in contemporary society influence the implementation of the norms enacted. External pressures stemming from the action of regional organisations, such as the Council of Europe and the EU, will also be investigated in detail. The central assumption of MEDIADEM is that economic, socio-political and cultural domestic peculiarities greatly affect how legal norms are interpreted and implemented, how they are perceived and received, and whether they are truly respected. Simultaneously, given the substantial changes brought by new technologies regarding the way citizens obtain information, the project will examine the opportunities and challenges posed by new media services for media freedom and independence. The project will make a significant contribution to media policy development by advancing knowledge on how media freedom and independence can be safeguarded in Europe. It will thus be of particular interest to state and European policy makers, civil society and the public at large.


News Article | February 19, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

If a country were to put on display a popular desire for public integrity, it might look like this: Since early February, tens of thousands of people in Romania have held almost daily protests against corruption in many cities. On weekends, the rallies are even larger. At night, masses of people held up their illuminated mobile phones, a signal of hope that has led the protests to be dubbed the “revolution of light.” This persistent and peaceful outcry on Romania’s streets for honest governance began after the ruling party tried to roll back anti-corruption efforts that have already led to thousands of officials being put on trial since 2013. People were shocked at how easily their progress in suppressing corruption could be eroded by politicians. The protests did eventually force lawmakers to back down. But now demonstrators want the ruling party to resign. It is difficult to see how Romania’s drama will play out. Yet for now it offers an important lesson: For many countries, it is not enough to merely constrain corruption, say, through aggressive prosecution, strict laws and ethics codes, or long jail time for officials who take bribes. Citizens must also be active in building up public integrity. This requires them to insist on essential qualities in governance: independence for judges, transparency in budget spending, freedom of the press, openness in trade, and simplicity in government regulations. These standards are in fact part of a newly designed method of measuring corruption known as the Index of Public Integrity, an effort funded by the European Union. Other attempts to measure corruption, such as those by the World Bank and the watchdog group Transparency International, have relied mainly on surveys of perceptions about such wrong-doing. Corrupt practices are often so secretive that they are difficult to detect. Thus researchers have relied on the estimates and experiences of those doing business in a country or on experts. In 2012, the EU set up a research group called ANTICORRP to reconceptualize the struggle against corruption. The group aimed to uncover the fact-based resources and structures that give a country the capacity to “empower” public integrity. The project ended in February, offering insights on the top priorities for government reform as well as a new way to rank countries. The top countries on the Index of Public Integrity are the Scandinavian countries as well as New Zealand, the UK, Ireland, Luxembourg, and the United States. The head of the effort, who happens to be a Romanian scholar, is Alina Mungiu-Pippidi of the Hertie School of Governance in Berlin. In a recent article in the academic journal Nature, she wrote about this new anticorruption strategy, citing the success of Estonia after the liberation of that Baltic state from the Soviet Union: “A smart strategy reduces opportunities and enables constraints, so that the monitoring of government by its own citizens takes effect. This is not just prospective theorizing: the world’s fastest evolving country on good governance, Estonia, did just that in the 1990s. Estonia opened up to honest competition, sold banks and newspapers to ‘clean’ countries..., introduced e-government as a single digital card to pay taxes, parking meters and vote, cut red tape, removed all judges with communist regime ties and created a steady income (from EU funds), independent from the government, for its civil society to grow.” Examples abound of countries minimizing corruption. Yet there may not be one template for reform. Each country must work within its own culture, history, and politics. In Romania, for example, the list of reforms demanded by protesters includes the election of an ombudsman and a ban on holding public office for anyone convicted of corruption. The common thread, however, is a widespread desire for public integrity. Reformers should not be discouraged by a persistence corruption in their country. “It would be wrong to believe that a country is entirely doomed by poor history,” states Dr.. Mungiu-Pippidi. Sometimes it takes tens of thousands of people in the streets over many days to make that point. Become a part of the Monitor community


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: SSH.2011.5.1-1 | Award Amount: 10.40M | Year: 2012

The central objective of ANTICORRP is to investigate and explain the factors that promote or hinder the development of effective anticorruption policies and impartial government institutions. ANTICORRP directly addresses the objective in the Work Program by examining what the causes of corruption are, how corruption can be conceptualized, measured and analysed, what the impact of corruption on societies is and how policy responses can be tailored as to deal effectively with this phenomenon. The starting point for this project is the following: The knowledge about the very negative impact that corruption has on a great number of factors that are important for human well-being (economic prosperity, population health, life satisfaction, gender equality, social trust, political legitimacy, etc.) is now well established. At the same time, knowledge about how corruption can be successfully fought by political means is much less developed. While this project concentrates on corruption in Europe, ANTICORRP also has a global scope. The project will identify general global trends concerning corruption and select over-performing and under-performing countries in terms of their progress towards less corrupt governance regimes and conduct more detailed qualitative analyses of these cases. The project includes participants from anthropology, criminology, economics, gender studies, history, legal studies, political science, public policy and administration and sociology at twenty-one units in sixteen European countries. Research will be conduced using a various set of methods including historical case-studies, large-scale surveys and ethnographical approaches. The project will strive to ensure that the research findings are spread to policy makers and the general public by using high profile multimedia and data visualisation tools as well as research-to-policy workshops at different levels and for different target audiences.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SSH-2010-1.3-1 | Award Amount: 3.39M | Year: 2011

The COCOPS project (Coordinating for Cohesion in the Public Sector of the Future) seeks to comparatively and quantitatively assess the impact of New Public Management-style (NPM) reforms in European countries, drawing on a team of leading European public administration scholars. This evidence-based project focuses on the national level and the important policy domains of health and employment services, and the utilities of water, energy and transport. It will analyse the impact of reforms in public management and public services that address citizens service needs and social cohesion in Europe. Evaluating the extent and consequences of NPMs alleged fragmenting tendencies and the resulting need for coordination is a key part of assessing these impacts. Subsequently, COCOPS will map and analyse innovative mechanisms in the public sector to improve policy coordination and its associated effects on economic competition, public sector performance, social cohesion and societal outcomes. The proposed research will contribute to our understanding of the impact of NPM by integrating sectoral and national analyses and to the development of future public sector reform strategies by drawing lessons from past experience, exploring trends and studying emerging public sector coordination practices. Drawing on existing large-scale datasets and innovative data collection in ten countries, the project intends to provide a comprehensive picture of the challenges facing the European public sector of the future. The empirical investigation will result in a transfer of innovative best practices across European member states and a futures study outlining key scenarios for the public sector of the future. It will contribute to maximal policy learning through the involvement of expert practitioner groups and other key stakeholders.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SSH.2013.2.1-2 | Award Amount: 3.19M | Year: 2014

The sefors research project seeks to understand the potential of social enterprise in the EU and beyond to improve social inclusiveness of society through greater stakeholder engagement, promotion of civic capitalism and changes to social service provision through a) investigation of key processes within social enterprises for delivering inclusion and innovation, including organisation and governance, financing, innovation and behavioural change and b) investigation of formal and informal institutional context, including political, cultural and economic environments and institutions directly and indirectly support social enterprises. The methodology will be to start from policy and social enterprise practitioner issues to develop a theoretical framework for inclusion and innovation processes in context, followed by novel experimentation with social enterprises and in depth case study analysis to expand and enrich. Longitudinal survey data will be used to test and validate conclusions. Representative policy makers and social enterprises will be engaged throughout the process to ensure relevancy and transmission of results and findings.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: INSO-1-2014 | Award Amount: 3.03M | Year: 2015

Increasing both transparency and efficiency of public spending in the age of austerity presents formidable challenges for European societies. Innovative, open data tools hold the key to simultaneously meet both. The key objective of the proposed project is to combine the provision of data on public spending in the area of public procurement with actionable governance indicators and a monitoring procedure facilitating whistleblowing and thus strengthening accountability and transparency of public administrations. Since public procurement is prone to corruption and budget deficit risks, high quality open data and innovative assessment tools in this area are especially relevant for the efficient and transparent use of public resources. The project, in particular, aims to systematically collect, analyse, and broadly disseminate tender-level information on public procurement in 35 jurisdictions across Europe. This data will be linked to company and public organisation information on finances and ownership and to information on mechanisms that increase accountability of public officials in order to systematically investigate the patterns and mechanisms of allocation of public resources in Europe. The proposed project addresses directly the objectives of the call by using innovative ICT-based measures and services which will provide wide access to information about governments spending and additionally involve private and public agents to actively collaborate in improving the quality and volume of the relevant data. Partners represent an effective combination of large, well-renowned institutions and small and highly-innovative ones, including scientists and researchers from computer and political sciences, sociology, criminology, and economics at 6 institutions from 4 European countries, both old and new members states. The project builds extensively on the partners prior innovative work in this area as well as their rich experience with EU funded projects.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: ERC-STG | Phase: ERC-2016-STG | Award Amount: 1.18M | Year: 2017

The Euro Crisis has had a transformative effect on the functional ambitions of the EU. It has, also, however, transformed the ways in which citizens can hold the EU institutions accountable. In the area of economic governance in particular, the post-crisis EU has created a significant new body of fiscal rules, managed largely by executive institutions. The nature of these rules, and the institutions entrusted to manage them, challenges our existing scientific understanding of accountability, creating considerable confusion among citizens as how economic decision-making in an EU context can be properly scrutinized. This project is devoted to addressing EU economic governances post-crisis accountability challenge. It will provide the first comprehensive and multi-disciplinary attempt to consider how EU decisions in the economic field can be challenged, either by political institutions or by individuals seeking judicial review. In doing so, it will seek to move beyond the disciplinary segmentation and conceptual limitations of current academic debates about accountability, combining legal analysis of decisions of national and EU Courts in economic governance with qualitative research on the political and functional constraints within which institutions reviewing economic decisions operate. The project will also carry a crucial normative dimension, using case studies in important fields of economic policy - from banking regulation to the coordination of national budgets - to map emerging accountability relationships and build recommendations on how to approach post-crisis accountability. Given the reach of EU economic governance into almost all domains of national policy, as well as the declining levels of public trust in EU action, identifying how a more accountable structure for EU policy-making could be built is a crucial scientific and societal task.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-CIG | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2012-CIG | Award Amount: 100.00K | Year: 2012

While the focus of public discussion in Europe in recent years has been financial stability, recent attention has shifted to economic growth and competitiveness as a key way out of the crisis. These goals are a central part of the EUs overarching Lisbon Strategy; a policy blue-print to be achieved by 2020. Little attention, however, has been paid to the role of law and Courts in achieving the strategys goals. This project will address this deficit examining the role of the EU Courts in relation to the Lisbon strategy in 3 key policy fields: health, education and employment. The project will conduct case studies in each field, interviewing judicial and non judicial actors in order to examine both the existing role of EU law in implementing the strategy and the potential interaction between law and the Lisbon Strategy in the future. It will create recommendations on how the interaction between Courts and policy-makers should be structured, drawing on the results of a stakeholder workshop and disseminated through a final report. The reports recommendations and output will be designed to feed into the the Lisbon Strategys mid-term review in 2015. The applicant will use good existing links to policy-makers and researchers through the host organization - the Hertie School of Governance - to disseminate the research results. Finally, the project can make a lasting impact on the researchers career integration. As a non-tenured Professor, the research opportunities provided by the grant can give the applicant the opportunity to become better established in an academic system not normally open to international researchers. The project and researcher will furthermore benefit from the inter-disciplinary environment provided by the host, the Hertie School of Governance.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-IEF | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2013-IEF | Award Amount: 223.78K | Year: 2014

The proposed research project is concerned with the interaction between the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) and Turkey, and seeks to contribute to the understanding of the Turkish case by looking through the ECtHR lens and of the European human rights system through the Turkish lens. The project will be based on an empirical analysis of the impact of the ECtHRs case law on democracy in Turkey based on the following typology of issues: 1) rights associated with ethno-linguistic group membership; and 2) rights associated with religious group membership. Each of these issues will be elaborated on the basis of: a) freedom of association and electoral rights (and freedoms of expression and assembly where relevant); and b) freedom of religion. The project will have a retrospective and a forward looking approach by examining the evolution of the case law over time, paying attention to critical junctures in: 1) the evolution of democracy in Turkey; and 2) the evolution of the European human rights regime. The methodology will be based on an examination of the case law (at the European and national level), interviews (in Turkey, Strasbourg and Brussels), secondary literature, review of official documents and media analysis. The project outputs will be: 1) a monograph published by an academic press, 2) peer-reviewed articles published in academic journals with open access, 3) a policy paper, and 4) an international conference in Turkey. Based on an interdisciplinary approach inspired from law, political science and sociology, the project aims to fill a gap in the literatures on Europeanization, transnational constitutional pluralism, legal mobilization and supranational human rights regimes, and to contribute to democracy and new governance studies.

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