La Plata, Argentina
La Plata, Argentina

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Adrover R.,Hepatology Center | Adrover R.,Hospital San Roque Of Gonnet | Cocozzella D.,Hepatology Center | Cocozzella D.,Hospital San Roque Of Gonnet | And 3 more authors.
Digestive Diseases and Sciences | Year: 2012

Background: Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a serious neuropsychiatric complication in both acute and chronic liver disease. Aims: To establish the utility of a portable noninvasive method to measure ammonia in the breath of healthy subjects and patients with HE. Methods: The study included 106 subjects: 44 women and 62 men, 51 healthy and 55 cirrhotic. The breath ammonia was measured with an electrochemical sensor and expressed in parts/billion (ppb). Results: The breath ammonia in healthy subjects had an average value of 151.4 ppb (95% confidence interval [CI]: 149.4-153.4) and the average value in cirrhotic patients was 169.9 ppb (95% CI: 163.5-176.2) (P < 0.0001). In cirrhotic patients with and without HE, the corresponding values were 184.1 ppb (95% CI: 167.7-200.6) and 162.9 ppb (95% CI: 158.8-167.0), respectively (P = 0.0011). Ammonia levels ≥165 ppb permitted a differentiation between healthy and cirrhotic subjects; the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for the ammonia-level values in cirrhotic versus control patients was 0.86 (95% CI: 0.79-0.93). In cirrhotic patients, ammonia levels ≥175 ppb permitted the distinction between patients with and without HE; the area under the ROC curve in cirrhotic patients with versus without HE was 0.83 (95% CI: 0.73-0.94). Conclusion: A portable sensor for measuring breath ammonia can be developed. If the results of the present study are confirmed, breath-ammonia determinations could produce a significant impact on the care of patients with cirrhosis and could even include the possibility of self-monitoring. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.


Ridruejo E.,Hospital Universitario Austral | Marciano S.,Hospital Italiano Of Buenos Aires | Galdame O.,Hospital Italiano Of Buenos Aires | Adrover R.,Hepatology Center | And 3 more authors.
Annals of Hepatology | Year: 2011

Background and aims. Genetic variations in the interleukin 28B (IL28B) gene have been associated with viral response to PEG-interferon-α/ribavirin (PR) therapy in hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 infected patients from North America, Europe and Asia. The importance of these IL28B variants for Argentine patients remains unknown. Material and methods. IL28B host genotypes (rs8099917 and rs12979860) were determined in a population of Argentine patients with European ancestry. Results were analyzed looking for their association with sustained virologic response (SVR) to PR therapy and compared with other baseline hosts' biochemical, histological and virological predictors of response. Results. We studied 102 patients, 60% were men, and 40% of them were rs8099917 TT and 18% rs12979860 CC. Mean baseline serum HCV RNA was 1.673.092 IU/mL and mean F score was: 2.10 ± 1.18 (21% cirrhotic). SVR rate was higher in rs8099917 TT genotypes (55%) when compared to GT/GG (25%) (p = 0.002) and in rs1512979860 CC (64%) than in CT/TT (30%) (p = 0.004). The univariate analysis showed that rs8099917 TT (OR 3.7; 95%CI 1.5-8.7; p = 0.002), rs12979860 CC (OR 4.6; 95%CI 1.5-13.7; p = 0.006), low viral load (OR 4.6; 95% CI 1.7-12.6; p = 0.002) and F0-2 (OR 8.5; 95% CI 2.3-30.6; p = 0.001) were significantly associated with SVR. In the multivariate analysis, rs12979860 CC, rs8099917 TT, viral load < 400.000 IU/mL and F0-2 were associated with SVR rates (p = 0.029, p = 0.012, p = 0.013 and p = 0.004, respectively). Conclusion. IL28B host genotypes should be added to baseline predictors of response to PR therapy in Latin American patients with European ancestry.


PubMed | Hepatology Center
Type: Evaluation Studies | Journal: Digestive diseases and sciences | Year: 2012

Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a serious neuropsychiatric complication in both acute and chronic liver disease.To establish the utility of a portable noninvasive method to measure ammonia in the breath of healthy subjects and patients with HE.The study included 106 subjects: 44 women and 62 men, 51 healthy and 55 cirrhotic. The breath ammonia was measured with an electrochemical sensor and expressed in parts/billion (ppb).The breath ammonia in healthy subjects had an average value of 151.4 ppb (95% confidence interval [CI]: 149.4-153.4) and the average value in cirrhotic patients was 169.9 ppb (95% CI: 163.5-176.2) (P < 0.0001). In cirrhotic patients with and without HE, the corresponding values were 184.1 ppb (95% CI: 167.7-200.6) and 162.9 ppb (95% CI: 158.8-167.0), respectively (P = 0.0011). Ammonia levels 165 ppb permitted a differentiation between healthy and cirrhotic subjects; the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for the ammonia-level values in cirrhotic versus control patients was 0.86 (95% CI: 0.79-0.93). In cirrhotic patients, ammonia levels 175 ppb permitted the distinction between patients with and without HE; the area under the ROC curve in cirrhotic patients with versus without HE was 0.83 (95% CI: 0.73-0.94).A portable sensor for measuring breath ammonia can be developed. If the results of the present study are confirmed, breath-ammonia determinations could produce a significant impact on the care of patients with cirrhosis and could even include the possibility of self-monitoring.

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