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Pasko P.,Jagiellonian University | Barton H.,Jagiellonian University | Zagrodzki P.,Jagiellonian University | Zagrodzki P.,Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physic | And 4 more authors.
Food Chemistry | Year: 2011

The aim of this study was to assess the influence of amaranth seeds in different doses, under conditions of oxidative stress induced by dietary fructose, on antioxidant status of selected rat tissues, erythrocytes and plasma. Fructose administration caused oxidative stress that was manifested by the increase in plasma malondialdehyde and by the decrease in the enzymatic antioxidant activity. Co-administration of amaranth seeds influenced the oxidative stress, as was evidenced by decreasing malondialdehyde in plasma and changing the activities of antioxidant enzymes (erythrocyte superoxide dismutase, catalase, and plasma glutathione peroxidase). Our findings demonstrate that amaranth seeds can act as a moderate protective agent against fructose-induced changes. Our results suggest that the antioxidative system of plasma, heart and lungs is more efficient when amaranth seeds are present in the diet. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source


Chlopicka J.,Jagiellonian University | Pasko P.,Jagiellonian University | Gorinstein S.,Hebrew University of Jerusalem | Jedryas A.,Jagiellonian University | And 2 more authors.
LWT - Food Science and Technology | Year: 2012

The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of adding (in two different doses 15% and 30%) pseudocereal (buckwheat, amaranth and quinoa) flour on the antioxidant properties and sensory value of breads. Buckwheat flour had the highest phenolic content (7.25±0.23mg/gdw). The content of total flavonoids in flours was about 2-4 fold higher when compared to breads. The addition of buckwheat flour to wheat bread, particularly in higher dose, was more effective in enhancing antioxidant activity, as evaluated by means of FRAP and DPPH, which increased by 2.36 fold, and 3.64 fold respectively, in comparison with other pseudocereal flours (amaranth, quinoa), which caused, in higher doses, the changes of above parameters within the ranges 1.20-1.79 fold, and 0.60-1.71 fold. Analysis of sensory results of breads showed that addition of buckwheat flour to the dough might improve subjective properties of bread and increase acceptable quality attributes such as taste, colour or odour. All these observations suggest that addition of buckwheat flour into bread can improve antioxidant as well as sensory properties of bread. Bread fortified with pseudocereal flours, and especially with buckwheat flour, may be placed on the market as a functional food. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Pasko P.,Jagiellonian University | Zagrodzki P.,Jagiellonian University | Zagrodzki P.,Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physic | Barton H.,Jagiellonian University | And 2 more authors.
Plant Foods for Human Nutrition | Year: 2010

The effect of Chenopodium quinoa seeds on lipid profile, glucose level, protein metabolism and selected essential elements (Na, K, Ca, Mg) level was determined in high-fructose fed male Wistar rats. Fructose decreased significantly LDL [42%, p<0.01] and activity of alkaline phosphatase [20%, p<0.05], and increased triglycerides level [86%, p<0.01]. The analysis of blood of rats fed quinoa indicated, that these seeds effectively reduced serum total cholesterol [26%, p<0.05], LDL [57%, p<0.008] and triglycerides [11%, p<0.05] when compared to the control group. Quinoa seeds also significantly reduced the level of glucose [10%, p<0.01] and plasma total protein level [16%, p<0.001]. Fructose significantly decreased HDL [15%, p<0.05] level in control group but when the quinoa seeds were added into the diet the decrease of HDL level was inhibited. Quinoa seeds did not prevent any adverse effect of increasing triglyceride level caused by fructose. It was shown in this study that quinoa seeds can reduce most of the adverse effects exerted by fructose on lipid profile and glucose level. © 2010 The Author(s). Source


Chlopicka J.,Jagiellonian University | Dobrowolska-Iwanek J.,Jagiellonian University | Wozniakiewicz M.,Jagiellonian University | Zagrodzki P.,Jagiellonian University | Zagrodzki P.,Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physic
Food Analytical Methods | Year: 2014

In recent years, there has been growing interest in the influence of sprouts on health. Fruit and vegetables are the main sources of organic acids for humans; however, little is yet known about organic acids in sprouts. In this study, the selection of the optimal parameters for extraction of organic acids from fresh, edible sprouts is reported. Two extraction techniques: microwave-assisted (MAE) and ultrasound-assisted were compared. The experimental conditions were optimized in terms of extraction time, temperature, and composition of extraction solution. To determine the influence of time and temperature of extraction or sample cooling, solvents used for extraction, on the analytical signal in isotachophoretic separation, the methods of experimental planning fractional factorial design: 3k-1 were used (three factor, three-level design). The optimal conditions for extraction of organic acids from radish sprouts were MAE, 90 °C; 18 min; and 0.01 M NaOH as a solvent. © 2013 The Author(s). Source


Pasko P.,Jagiellonian University | Barton H.,Jagiellonian University | Zagrodzki P.,Jagiellonian University | Zagrodzki P.,Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physic | And 4 more authors.
Plant Foods for Human Nutrition | Year: 2010

Oxidative stress plays an important role as a mediator of damage produced by fructose metabolism. This work was designed to investigate the effect of diet supplemented with quinoa seeds on oxidative stress in plasma, heart, kidney, liver, spleen, lung, testis and pancreas of fructose administered rats. Fructose administration (310 g/kg fodder for 5 weeks) caused oxidative stress that was manifested by the increase in plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) (p<0.05), and by the non-significant changes in the enzymatic antioxidant potential in plasma and most of tissues. Co-administration of quinoa seeds (310 g/kg fodder) maintained normal activities of some enzymes. It also influenced the oxidative stress as was evidenced by decreasing MDA in plasma, and decreasing the activities of antioxidant enzymes (erythrocyte superoxide dismutase - eSOD, catalase -CAT, plasma glutathione peroxidase - pGPX). These findings demonstrate that quinoa seeds can act as a moderate protective agent against potential of fructose-induced changes in rats by reducing lipid peroxidation and by enhancing the antioxidant capacity of blood (plasma) and heart, kidney, testis, lung and pancreas. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. Source

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