Hennepin County Medical Center

Minneapolis, MN, United States

Hennepin County Medical Center

Minneapolis, MN, United States
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News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

Digi Smart Solutions help organizations comply with public health requirements and food safety regulations set by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). "With the wealth of our assets and expertise we have best-in-class products for local businesses as well as international enterprises. Our solutions span the entire chain of custody to help companies achieve operational efficiencies, complete visibility and verification of compliance," said Kevin C. Riley, Digi's chief operating officer who oversees the Smart Solutions group. "Additionally, as markets' needs continue to unfold, we'll be able to update our products to address those changes." A Tailored Solution for Each Industry Digi Smart Solutions address the day-to-day issues of maintaining product quality and safety while lowering costs and achieving overarching goals of higher customer satisfaction and brand reputation. They also address the needs of customers with unique challenges that span operational and safety regulatory requirements. Digi has established itself as a clear leader with more than 10,000 locations under management, a combined 25 years of temperature management experience and more than 1 billion temperature sensor readings. A sample of current customers includes Tim Hortons, Love's Travel Stops, Hennepin County Medical Center, Rite Aid Corporation, and the University of Notre Dame. The Digi Smart Solutions group has three primary areas: Foodservice: Products are designed to address the wide variety of environments in the foodservice industry including Quick Service Restaurants (QSR), full service restaurants, corporate dining, grocery stores, convenience stores and food service operations within other locations (i.e. movie theaters, rest stops, etc.). The system helps customers meet stringent task management, food safety and sanitation needs to securely capture, document, and report equipment and food temperatures to meet and exceed the U.S. FDA's Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) and Model Food Code. The solutions streamline manual operational checklists and provide insight to managers on how well their teams are adhering to quality and food safety guidelines. In educational settings (K-12, higher education), Digi Smart Solutions allow local and state agencies to document and streamline processes for schools participating in Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) Child Nutrition Programs. These programs require a food safety program based on Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) principles that conform to guidance issued by the USDA. The guidelines address all aspects of foodservice (receiving, storing, preparing, cooking, cooling, reheating, holding, assembling, packaging, transporting and serving). Transportation and Logistics: Products provide real-time and location-based temperature monitoring. Recent innovations in GPS and low power wireless sensing technology give customers complete visibility throughout the transport chain. As part of the FSMA, the FDA issued new food safety rules to prevent food contamination during transportation. Specific areas of FSMA compliance include transport asset sanitation and pre-cooling, temperature control and tracking, temperature certification and data exchange, and data retention. Digi Smart Solutions transportation products follow HACCP and National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) standards to provide a traceable independent audit of both reefer units and product temperatures. For more information, see "Digi International Introduces Digi SafeTemps for Transportation and Logistics." Healthcare and Pharmacy: Digi Smart Solutions for healthcare provides task management and real-time temperature monitoring solutions of critical items in pharmacy, hospital, blood bank and laboratory settings, including vaccines, medications, and other critical items. For pharmaceuticals, Digi Smart Solutions helps support the CDC Guidelines for Vaccine Storage (2016), along with the various Board of Pharmacy standards and Department of Health Vaccine For Children requirements. Digi Smart Solutions are comprised of easy-to-install hand-held probes, wireless sensors, gateways and easy-to-use software that allow temperature data and tasks to be monitored, logged, and retrieved. Additionally, the solutions offer an open API for integration into back-office systems. Digi Smart Solutions are available in a variety of subscription-based models for HACCP and NIST environments, and requires no capital expense. Hardware and software are included as part of the subscription with information hosted on servers managed by Digi. About Digi International  Digi International (NASDAQ: DGII) is a leading global provider of business and mission-critical machine-to-machine (M2M) and Internet of Things (IoT) connectivity products and services. We help our customers create next-generation connected products and deploy and manage critical communications infrastructures in demanding environments with high levels of security, relentless reliability and bulletproof performance. Founded in 1985, we've helped our customers connect over 100 million things, and growing. For more information, visit Digi's website at www.digi.com, or call 877-912-3444 (U.S.) or 952-912-3444 (International). To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/digi-international-cold-chain-solutions-relaunches-as-digi-smart-solutions-group-300451197.html


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

According to Molly Moilanen, co-chair of Minnesotans for a Smoke-Free Generation, a coalition of more than 50 health organizations, "Almost 95 percent of adult smokers started by 21. That means to prevent addiction, we must keep people from starting before then. Raising the tobacco age will help do that." A national consensus is growing to prevent addictions and future health problems by raising the sales age for tobacco products to 21. Two states and more than 220 cities and counties throughout the United States have raised the tobacco age. Edina was the first city in Minnesota to raise the smoking age earlier this week. Minnesotans for a Smoke-Free Generation is a coalition of Minnesota organizations that share a common goal of saving Minnesota youth from a lifetime of addiction to tobacco. Each year in Minnesota tobacco use is responsible for more than 6,300 deaths and more than $3 billion in preventable health care costs. 95 percent of adult smokers started before the age of 21. The coalition supports policies that prevent initiation and reduce youth smoking, including keeping tobacco prices high, raising the tobacco sale age to 21, limiting access to candy-, fruit- and menthol-flavored tobacco and funding future tobacco prevention programs. Partners include: A Healthier Southwest, African American Leadership Forum, Allina Health, American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network, American Heart Association, American Lung Association in Minnesota, Apple Tree Dental, Association for Nonsmokers – Minnesota, Becker County Energize, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota, CentraCare Health, Children's Defense Fund – Minnesota, Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, ClearWay MinnesotaSM, Comunidades Latinos Unidas En Servicio – CLUES, Essentia Health, Four Corners Partnership, Gillette Children's Specialty Healthcare, HealthEast, HealthPartners, Hennepin County Medical Center, Hope Dental Clinic, Indigenous Peoples Task Force, ISAIAH, LAAMPP Institute, Lake Region Healthcare, Lincoln Park Children and Families Collaborative, Local Public Health Association of Minnesota, March of Dimes, Mayo Clinic, Medica, Minnesota Academy of Family Physicians, Minnesota Association of Community Health Centers, Minnesota Cancer Alliance, Minnesota Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics, Minnesota Council of Health Plans, Minnesota Hospital Association, Minnesota Medical Association, Minnesota Oral Health Coalition, Minnesota Public Health Association, Model Cities of St. Paul, Inc., NAMI Minnesota, North Memorial Health Care, NorthPoint Health and Wellness Center, PartnerSHIP 4 Health, Perham Health, Rainbow Health Initiative, SEIU Healthcare Minnesota, St. Paul Chamber of Commerce, Tobacco Free Alliance, Twin Cities Medical Society, UCare and WellShare International. Find out more at: smokefreegenmn.org. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/legislation-would-raise-minnesotas-smoking-age-to-21-300451619.html


It's no easy job, but - knock on wood - there have been no reported successful cyberattacks or malicious outsiders hacking Mayo's systems. Still, the WannaCry worm has infected at least some medical devices in the U.S., and well-funded hospitals like the Mayo Clinic may not be the first medical centers where successful hacking would crop up. Rather, the public ought to think about the more than 600 financially struggling hospitals in smaller communities that are on the verge of closure. "Those are the people that we need to keep in mind for medical devices, not Mayo," said Kevin McDonald, Mayo's director of clinical information security. "It costs a ton of money to be able to do this," he said. "Medical devices have now become the weakest link in your enterprise security defenses." McDonald spoke Thursday morning in Silver Spring, Md., on the first day of the Food and Drug Administration's latest public forum on cybersecurity and medical devices. The two-day event is called "Cybersecurity of Medical Devices: A Regulatory Science Gap Analysis," and is intended to produce a document that will identify potential "gaps" in regulation, product design and basic research in med-tech cybersecurity. Unlike the previous meetings on med-tech cyber precautions, this week's workshop takes place against the backdrop of a worldwide cyberattack that has affected hundreds of thousands of computers and put government agencies on high alert for another wave. The so-called WannaCry worm is based on a security vulnerability in older versions of Microsoft Windows, which is still run on many medical devices today. The Windows flaw was discovered by the National Security Agency years ago, and publicized recently after hackers got ahold of the NSA files. The worm is a form of "ransomware" that infects computers and computer networks, locking down critical files until the victim agrees to pay a ransom. "A few years ago the biggest problem was the breach," which would allow a hacker to steal patient data and sell it on the black market for a profit. "What's really scary is now they've figured out how to monetize the attacks directly," said workshop speaker Todd Carpenter, chief engineer at Minneapolis' Adventium Labs. No U.S. hospital has yet publicly acknowledged being affected by the WannaCry worm. Nonprofit health care information-security organization Hitrust Alliance said it had seen evidence that devices made by Siemens and Bayer's MedRad subsidiary, along with other unnamed device makers, have been affected by the worm since the news broke last Friday morning that WannaCry had crippled dozens of hospitals in the United Kingdom. Thursday's FDA meeting was part of the long-running effort in the U.S. to not just raise the profile of med-tech cybersecurity as an issue, but to break through the logjams that have stood in the way of progress. One key question is how to pay for it all. "Health care institutions do not have the time, money or resources to independently fix the problems," said one of McDonald's slides, under the title "Assumptions We Need to Make." "The costs and effort for securing devices should not, and cannot, be the full responsibility of hospitals." The Star Tribune reported earlier this week that Hennepin County Medical Center will need to spend $200,000 to address vulnerabilities raised by WannaCry in a single machine. But the problem of cybersecurity vulnerabilities in medical devices is much deeper than figuring out who's going to write these large checks. Ken Hoyme, director of security for product and engineering systems at Boston Scientific, said hospitals sometimes buy expensive equipment whose service life doesn't take into account how long the underlying operating system will be current. "There is this willingness to accept a device with an expiring operating system, when the buyer knows for certain that they are going to use it for 20 years," Hoyme said at the workshop. "There are certainly research needs for something that would fill that niche (for a durable OS) in a way that is cost-effective and long-term supportable." Explore further: What we currently know about the global cyberattack


News Article | July 11, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

HANOVER, Md.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Minneapolis-based Hennepin County Medical Center (HCMC) recently built a private network leveraging Ciena's (NYSE: CIEN) converged packet-optical solutions to support its robust research practice and Level 1 trauma center. HCMC can now connect its data centers and key locations to efficiently turn-up capacity for always-on access to share Electronic Health Records (EHRs), provide reliable connectivity to treat patients and support remote employees. Hennepin County Medical Center (HCMC) is a 484-bed comprehensive academic medical center and public teaching hospital located in downtown Minneapolis. It was one of the first hospitals in the country to be verified as a Level I Trauma Center and continues to be a leader in providing trauma care – assessing more than 22,000 trauma patients each year. As Minnesota's first Level I Adult and Pediatric Trauma Center, HCMC admits and treats more traumatic brain injuries than any other hospital in Minnesota. For more information, please visit www.hcmc.org Ciena (NYSE: CIEN) is a network strategy and technology company. We translate best-in-class technology into value through a high-touch, consultative business model – with a relentless drive to create exceptional experiences measured by outcomes. For updates on Ciena, follow us on Twitter @Ciena, LinkedIn, the Ciena Insights blog, or visit www.ciena.com. You are encouraged to review the Investors section of our website, where we routinely post press releases, SEC filings, recent news, financial results, and other announcements. From time to time we exclusively post material information to this website along with other disclosure channels that we use. This press release contains certain forward-looking statements that are based on our current expectations, forecasts, information and assumptions. These statements involve inherent risks and uncertainties. Actual results or outcomes may differ materially from those stated or implied, because of risks and uncertainties, including those detailed in our most recent annual or quarterly report filed with the SEC. Forward-looking statements include statements regarding our expectations, beliefs, intentions or strategies and can be identified by words such as "anticipate," "believe," "could," "estimate," "expect," "intend," "may," "should," "will," and "would" or similar words. Ciena assumes no obligation to update the information included in this press release, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.


News Article | May 26, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

The final Health and Human Services Finance bill didn't include a state-run tobacco quitline. Previous versions of the bill had included a provision, introduced by Representative Dario Anselmo (R-Edina), that would have done so. Refusing to fund a quitline could mean those who need help quitting smoking in the future won't get it, especially after existing services for smokers end in 2020. The state budget does continue to fully fund the Statewide Health Improvement Partnership (SHIP). SHIP funds initiatives to expand opportunities for active living, healthy eating and tobacco-free living. "We are glad that the final budget funds SHIP, but it's irresponsible not to invest in a quitline as well," said Janelle Waldock, Vice President of Community Health and Health Equity at Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota and Co-Chair of Minnesotans for a Smoke-Free Generation. "Minnesota collected $815 million in tobacco taxes and tobacco settlement payments in 2016 – more than enough to support prevention and cessation. Governor Dayton and legislators should make quitline funding a priority next year." Minnesotans for a Smoke-Free Generation also expressed dismay earlier this week when the House and Senate passed a tax bill containing nearly $50 million in tax benefits for the tobacco industry. Additionally, this year Senator Carla Nelson (R-Rochester) introduced legislation increasing the tobacco sale age to 21. With Edina recently becoming the first city in Minnesota to raise the age, momentum is building for this issue to be considered at the Capitol in 2018. "Almost 95 percent of adult smokers started by 21," said Moilanen. "Increasing the tobacco age will prevent young people from starting and help create a smoke-free generation in Minnesota." Minnesotans for a Smoke-Free Generation is a coalition of Minnesota organizations that share a common goal of saving Minnesota youth from a lifetime of addiction to tobacco. Each year in Minnesota tobacco use is responsible for more than 6,300 deaths and more than $3 billion in preventable health care costs. 95 percent of adult smokers started before the age of 21. The coalition supports policies that prevent initiation and reduce youth smoking, including keeping tobacco prices high, raising the tobacco sale age to 21, limiting access to candy-, fruit- and menthol-flavored tobacco and funding future tobacco prevention programs. Partners include: A Healthier Southwest, African American Leadership Forum, Allina Health, American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network, American Heart Association, American Lung Association in Minnesota, Apple Tree Dental, Association for Nonsmokers – Minnesota, Becker County Energize, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota, CentraCare Health, Children's Defense Fund – Minnesota, Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, ClearWay MinnesotaSM, Comunidades Latinos Unidas En Servicio – CLUES, Essentia Health, Four Corners Partnership, Gillette Children's Specialty Healthcare, HealthEast, HealthPartners, Hennepin County Medical Center, Hope Dental Clinic, Indigenous Peoples Task Force, ISAIAH, LAAMPP Institute, Lake Region Healthcare, Lincoln Park Children and Families Collaborative, Local Public Health Association of Minnesota, March of Dimes, Mayo Clinic, Medica, Minnesota Academy of Family Physicians, Minnesota Association of Community Health Centers, Minnesota Cancer Alliance, Minnesota Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics, Minnesota Council of Health Plans, Minnesota Hospital Association, Minnesota Medical Association, Minnesota Oral Health Coalition, Minnesota Public Health Association, Model Cities of St. Paul, Inc., NAMI Minnesota, North Memorial Health Care, NorthPoint Health and Wellness Center, PartnerSHIP 4 Health, Perham Health, Rainbow Health Initiative, SEIU Healthcare Minnesota, St. Paul Area Chamber of Commerce, Tobacco Free Alliance, Twin Cities Medical Society,UCare and WellShare International. Find out more at: smokefreegenmn.org. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/end-of-session-signals-missed-opportunity-to-help-smokers-and-protect-kids-300464510.html


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

Specifically, the tax bill passed by the Legislature: The bill contained one positive provision, increasing the tax rate on large containers of moist snuff tobacco. In total, these tax breaks will cost the state nearly $50 million over the next four years. These are dollars that could be dedicated to helping smokers quit and preventing youth from starting. Minnesotans for a Smoke-Free Generation is a coalition of Minnesota organizations that share a common goal of saving Minnesota youth from a lifetime of addiction to tobacco. Each year in Minnesota tobacco use is responsible for more than 6,300 deaths and more than $3 billion in preventable health care costs. Nearly 95 percent of adult smokers started before the age of 21. The coalition supports policies that prevent initiation and reduce youth smoking, including keeping tobacco prices high, raising the tobacco sale age to 21, limiting access to candy-, fruit- and menthol-flavored tobacco and funding future tobacco prevention programs. Partners include: A Healthier Southwest, African American Leadership Forum, Allina Health, American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network, American Heart Association, American Lung Association in Minnesota, Apple Tree Dental, Association for Nonsmokers – Minnesota, Becker County Energize, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota, CentraCare Health, Children's Defense Fund – Minnesota, Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, ClearWay MinnesotaSM, Comunidades Latinos Unidas En Servicio – CLUES, Essentia Health, Four Corners Partnership, Gillette Children's Specialty Healthcare, HealthEast, HealthPartners, Hennepin County Medical Center, Hope Dental Clinic, Indigenous Peoples Task Force, ISAIAH, LAAMPP Institute, Lake Region Healthcare, Lincoln Park Children and Families Collaborative, Local Public Health Association of Minnesota, March of Dimes, Mayo Clinic, Medica, Minnesota Academy of Family Physicians, Minnesota Association of Community Health Centers, Minnesota Cancer Alliance, Minnesota Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics, Minnesota Council of Health Plans, Minnesota Hospital Association, Minnesota Medical Association, Minnesota Oral Health Coalition, Minnesota Public Health Association, Model Cities of St. Paul, Inc., NAMI Minnesota, North Memorial Health Care, NorthPoint Health and Wellness Center, PartnerSHIP 4 Health, Perham Health, Rainbow Health Initiative, SEIU Healthcare Minnesota, St. Paul Area Chamber of Commerce, Tobacco Free Alliance, Twin Cities Medical Society, UCare and WellShare International. Find out more at: smokefreegenmn.org. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/tax-bill-tobacco-industry-wins-kids-lose-300463523.html

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