Arkadelphia, AR, United States

Henderson State University

www.hsu.edu
Arkadelphia, AR, United States

Henderson State University, founded in 1890 as Arkadelphia Methodist College, is a four-year public liberal arts university located in Arkadelphia, Arkansas, United States. It is Arkansas's only member of the Council of Public Liberal Arts Colleges. Henderson's curricula based on the belief that a liberal arts education is essential for all undergraduates; Henderson utilizes a program based on a core of courses in the arts and science. The school owns and operates radio station KSWH-FM, as well as the local Public-access television cable TV channel, HTV on Suddenlink's channel 9. Wikipedia.


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News Article | May 12, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

FILE - In this July 22, 2013, file photo, an 11-year-old boy looks over a Boy Scout-themed Norman Rockwell exhibition at the Church History Museum in Salt Lake City, Utah. The Mormon church, the largest sponsor of Boy Scouts troops in the United States, announced Thursday, May 11, 2017, it is pulling older teenagers from the organization as the religion takes a step toward developing its own global scouting-like program. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File) SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — The Mormon church, the biggest sponsor of Boy Scout troops in the United States, announced Thursday it is pulling as many as 185,000 older youths from the organization as part of an effort to start its own scouting-like program. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints said the move wasn't triggered by the Boy Scouts' decision in 2015 to allow gay troop leaders, since Mormon-sponsored troops have remained free to exclude such adults on religious grounds. But at least one leading Mormon scholar said that the Boy Scouts and the church have been diverging on values in recent years and that the policy on gays was probably a contributing factor in the split. Saying it wants a new, simplified program of its own that is more closely tailored to Mormon teenagers, the church announced that boys ages 14 to 18 will no longer participate in the Boy Scouts starting next year. The church said the decision will affect 185,000 teens; the Boy Scouts put the number at 130,000. The loss is only a small portion of the 2.3 million youths in the Boy Scouts of America, but the organization has been grappling with declining membership for years and has enjoyed an unusually close bond with the Mormon church for more than a century because of their shared values. Joining the Boy Scouts is practically automatic among Mormon boys. Boy Scouts of America spokeswoman Effie Delimarkos said the organization is saddened by the decision but understands the church's desire to customize a program. About 280,000 Mormon boys ages 8 to 13 will remain in the Scouts while the church develops its program, the Mormons said. The Boy Scouts estimated their number at 330,000. The church did not say when the younger boys will be withdrawn from the Boy Scouts. Bryan Burton, a 26-year-old Mormon in Salt Lake City, said the decision makes sense. He likes the idea that the church is moving toward its own scouting program. "We're trying to be an inclusive church worldwide," Burton said. "If our Boy Scouts is only for boys in America, what are we doing for the rest of the world?" Like other conservative faiths, the Mormon church opposes gay marriage and teaches that being in a homosexual relationship is a sin. The church initially said it was "deeply troubled" by the Boy Scouts' policy change on gays but stayed with the organization after receiving assurances it could appoint troop leaders according to its own religious and moral values. In Thursday's announcement, the church said that it learned recently that the Boy Scouts are considering admitting girls, but that its decision was made independently of that. Matthew Bowman, a Mormon scholar and history professor at Henderson State University, said the schism reflects the two organizations' diverging values, with gays and girls among the issues on which they are moving apart. "The church is wedded very much to traditional gender roles and they see the Boy Scouts of America increasingly move away from that," Bowman said. "That means that they have come to see it as less of a hospitable place." Thursday's announcement represents a first step toward something that has been in the works for years: a Mormon-run scouting-type program that could be used in congregations around the world. The church has 15.8 million members, nearly 6 in 10 of them outside the U.S. and Canada. The programs the church uses with the Boy Scouts of America are only available in the U.S. and Canada. "The long game here is the church looking forward to a time when Americans are even more of a minority in the church than they are now," Bowman said. Mormon teenagers who want to continue working toward the Eagle Scout rank will be able to do that on their own while also participating in the new program, said church spokesman Eric Hawkins. The Boy Scout movement has been entrenched in Mormon culture for as long as anyone can remember. In 2013, the church put on an extravagant theatrical production inside its 21,000-seat auditorium in Salt Lake City to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the faith's alliance with the Boy Scouts. A Boy Scout training complex in West Virginia is named after Mormon church President Thomas S. Monson, a longtime member of the Boy Scouts' executive board and a major supporter. Charles Dahlquist II, a Mormon, holds the top volunteer position with the Boy Scouts. Becoming an Eagle Scout is an especially proud badge of honor within Mormon culture. Many Utah lawmakers list it on their resumes. Social media was buzzing with jokes Thursday about Mormon women adjusting their hopes of finding a husband who was an Eagle Scout. This story has been corrected to show that the Mormon church says 185,000 teenagers will no longer participate in the Boy Scouts, not 180,000.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

LearnHowToBecome.org, a leading resource provider for higher education and career information, has announced its list of the best colleges and universities in Arkansas for 2017. 20 four-year schools made the list, with John Brown University, Hendrix College, Ouachita Baptist University, Harding University and University of Arkansas taking the lead as the top five. Of the 26 two-year schools that were also included, North Arkansas College, Arkansas State University Mountain Home, Black River Technical College, Pulaski Technical College and Arkansas Northeastern College were the top five. A full list of winning schools is included below. “Arkansas is seeing a record low for unemployment in 2017, which is great news for college grads entering the job market,” said Wes Ricketts, senior vice president of LearnHowToBecome.org. “The schools on our list have demonstrated value for not only providing a strong education, but also helping students fulfill career goals after they graduate.” To be included on Arkansas “Best Colleges” list, schools must be regionally accredited, not-for-profit institutions. Each college is also scored on additional data that includes annual alumni earnings 10 years after entering college, career services offered, availability of financial aid and base metrics such as student/teacher ratios and graduation rates. Complete details on each college, their individual scores and the data and methodology used to determine the LearnHowToBecome.org “Best Colleges in Arkansas” list, visit: The Best Four-Year Colleges in Arkansas for 2017 include: Arkansas State University-Main Campus Arkansas Tech University Central Baptist College Harding University Henderson State University Hendrix College John Brown University Lyon College Ouachita Baptist University Philander Smith College Southern Arkansas University Main Campus University of Arkansas University of Arkansas at Little Rock University of Arkansas at Monticello University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences University of Arkansas-Fort Smith University of Central Arkansas University of the Ozarks Williams Baptist College The Best Two-Year Colleges in Arkansas for 2017 include: Arkansas Northeastern College Arkansas State University - Beebe Arkansas State University - Mountain Home Arkansas State University - Newport Baptist Health Schools-Little Rock Black River Technical College College of the Ouachitas Cossatot Community College of the University of Arkansas Crowley's Ridge Technical Institute East Arkansas Community College Mid-South Community College National Park College North Arkansas College NorthWest Arkansas Community College Northwest Technical Institute Ozarka College Phillips Community College Pulaski Technical College Remington College-Little Rock Campus Rich Mountain Community College South Arkansas Community College Southeast Arkansas College Southern Arkansas University Tech University of Arkansas Community College - Batesville University of Arkansas Community College - Morrilton University of Arkansas Hope - Texarkana Arkansas Northeastern College About Us: LearnHowtoBecome.org was founded in 2013 to provide data and expert driven information about employment opportunities and the education needed to land the perfect career. Our materials cover a wide range of professions, industries and degree programs, and are designed for people who want to choose, change or advance their careers. We also provide helpful resources and guides that address social issues, financial aid and other special interest in higher education. Information from LearnHowtoBecome.org has proudly been featured by more than 700 educational institutions.


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Community for Accredited Online Schools, a leading resource provider for higher education information, has ranked the best schools with online programs in the state of Arkansas for 2017. Of the four-year schools ranked, 15 made the list; University of Arkansas, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Arkansas State University, Harding University and University of Central Arkansas scored as the top five schools. The state’s top 16 two-year schools were also highlighted, with Arkansas State University Beebe, College of the Ouachitas, North Arkansas College, Phillips Community College and Arkansas Northeastern College taking the top five spots. AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org used more than a dozen data points to determine which online schools are the best in Arkansas. Schools on the list must meet several basic requirements to be included: they must be institutionally accredited, they must be a public or private not-for-profit institution. Each college was also scored based on additional criteria that includes employment resources and counseling, student/teacher ratio, graduation rate and financial aid availability. “Today, more and more students are able to access an online education, and students in Arkansas are no exception,” said Doug Jones, CEO and founder of AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org. “The schools on our list are best-in-class for providing online programs that suit the needs of students who prefer flexibility for their coursework.” For more details on where each school falls in the rankings and the data and methodology used to determine the lists, visit: Arkansas’ Best Online Four-Year Schools for 2017 include the following: Arkansas Baptist College Arkansas State University - Main Campus Arkansas Tech University Central Baptist College Ecclesia College Harding University Henderson State University John Brown University Southern Arkansas University Main Campus University of Arkansas University of Arkansas at Little Rock University of Arkansas at Monticello University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences University of Arkansas - Fort Smith University of Central Arkansas Arkansas’ Best Online Two-Year Schools for 2017 include the following: Arkansas Northeastern College Arkansas State University - Beebe Arkansas State University - Mountain Home College of the Ouachitas Cossatot Community College of the University of Arkansas East Arkansas Community College National Park College North Arkansas College NorthWest Arkansas Community College Ozarka College Phillips Community College South Arkansas Community College Southeast Arkansas College Southern Arkansas University Tech University of Arkansas Community College - Batesville University of Arkansas Hope - Texarkana ### About Us: AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable, quality education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success.


Roberts N.,University of South Carolina | Galluch P.S.,Roanoke College | Dinger M.,Henderson State University | Grover V.,Clemson University
MIS Quarterly: Management Information Systems | Year: 2012

Absorptive capacity is a firm's ability to identify, assimilate, transform, and apply valuable external knowledge. It is considered an imperative for business success. Modern information technologies perform a critical role in the development and maintenance of a firm's absorptive capacity. We provide an assessment of absorptive capacity in the information systems literature. IS scholars have used the absorptive capacity construct in diverse and often contradictory ways. Confusion surrounds how absorptive capacity should be conceptualized, its appropriate level of analysis, and how it can be measured. Our aim in reviewing this construct is to reduce such confusion by improving our understanding of absorptive capacity and guiding its effective use in IS research. We trace the evolution of the absorptive capacity construct in the broader organizational literature and pay special attention to its conceptualization, assumptions, and relationship to organizational learning. Following this, we investigate how absorptive capacity has been conceptualized, measured, and used in IS research. We also examine how absorptive capacity fits into distinct IS themes and facilitates understanding of various IS phenomena. Based on our analysis, we provide a framework through which IS researchers can more fully leverage the rich aspects of absorptive capacity when investigating the role of information technology in organizations.


Harris A.L.,Henderson State University | Morrison K.,Henderson State University
Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics | Year: 2013

The frozen core approximation has been successfully used for many years to model 4-body collisions as 3-body collisions. We present a comprehensive comparison of 3-body and 4-body models for the process of single ionization of helium by electron impact using our 4-body distorted wave model. Differences between the two models are observed in both magnitude and peak locations. We identify four possible sources for the discrepancies between the models, and isolate the specific physical causes of the discrepancies. © 2013 IOP Publishing Ltd.


Williamson W.P.,Henderson State University | Hood Jr. R.W.,University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
Mental Health, Religion and Culture | Year: 2012

This is a longitudinal study of spiritual transformation at the Lazarus Project (LP), a 12-month Pentecostal-Charismatic residency program for substance abuse. In 2006, we began administering to residents an assessment protocol consisting of psychological (depression, self-esteem, psychopathology, Big 5 personality markers) and religiosity (fundamentalism, religious orientation, spiritual well-being, mysticism) measures. Assessments were at: (T1) induction; (T2) six months; (T3) graduation; and (T4) one-year post-graduation. We also assessed a membership group from the sponsoring church using the same protocol. Analyses found that general change in graduate scores occurred from T1 to T2 and persisted to T3 and T4. Comparative analyses found that LP graduate score patterns generally agreed with those of LP dropouts at T1, but diverged at T2, becoming more similar to score patterns of church members. Using all measures, a regression analysis found that the personality marker of (less) openness was the most powerful predictor of resident dropout. The preliminary findings suggest that, among chronic substance abusers, the LP helps to facilitate conversion as a form of spiritual transformation that persists at least one-year post-graduation. © 2012 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.


Szulczyk K.R.,Henderson State University | McCarl B.A.,Texas A&M University | Cornforth G.,Texas A&M University
Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews | Year: 2010

This research examines in detail the technology and economics of substituting ethanol for gasoline. This endeavor examines three issues. First, the benefits of ethanol/gasoline blends are examined, and then the technical problems of large-scale implementation of ethanol. Second, ethanol production possibilities are examined in detail from a variety of feedstocks and technologies. The feedstocks are the starch/sugar crops and crop residues, while the technologies are corn wet mill, dry grind, and lignocellulosic fermentation. Examining in detail the production possibilities allows the researchers to identity the extent of technological change, production costs, byproducts, and GHG emissions. Finally, a U.S. agricultural model, FASOMGHG, is updated which predicts the market penetration of ethanol given technological progress, variety of technologies and feedstocks, market interactions, energy prices, and GHG prices. FASOMGHG has several interesting results. First, gasoline prices have a small expansionary impact on the U.S. ethanol industry. Both agricultural producers' income and cost both increase with higher energy prices. If wholesale gasoline is $4 per gallon, the predicted ethanol market penetration attains 53% of U.S. gasoline consumption in 2030. Second, the corn wet mill remains an important industry for ethanol production, because this industry also produces corn oil, which could be converted to biodiesel. Third, GHG prices expand the ethanol industry. However, the GHG price expands the corn wet mill, but has an ambiguous impact on lignocellulosic ethanol. Feedstocks for lignocellulosic fermentation can also be burned with coal to generate electricity. Both industries are quite GHG efficient. Finally, U.S. government subsidies on biofuels have an expansionary impact on ethanol production, but may only increase market penetration by an additional 1% in 2030, which is approximately 6 billion gallons. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Trademark
Henderson State University | Date: 2015-12-18

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Henderson State University | Date: 2015-07-27

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Henderson State University | Date: 2016-03-15

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