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Wang X.,Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center | Li X.,Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center | Cheng Y.,Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center | Sun X.,Institute of Occupational Health and Poison Control | And 4 more authors.
Human Genomics | Year: 2015

Background: Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA) is among the leading causes of cancer mortality, especially in developed countries. A high level of somatic copy number alterations (CNAs) accumulates over the decades in the progression from Barrett's esophagus, the precursor lesion, to EA. Accurate identification of somatic CNAs is essential to understand cancer development. Many studies have been conducted for the detection of CNA in EA using microarrays. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies are believed to have advantages in sensitivity and accuracy to detect CNA, yet no NGS-based CNA detection in EA has been reported. Results: In this study, we analyzed whole-exome (WES) and whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data for detecting CNA from a published large-scale genomic study of EA. Two specific comparisons were conducted. First, the recurrent CNAs based on WGS and WES data from 145 EA samples were compared to those found in five previous microarray-based studies. We found that the majority of the previously identified regions were also detected in this study. Interestingly, some novel amplifications and deletions were discovered using the NGS data. In particular, SKI and PRKCZ detected in a deletion region are involved in transforming growth factor-β pathway, suggesting the potential utility of novel biomarkers for EA. Second, we compared CNAs detected in WGS and WES data from the same 15 EA samples. No large-scale CNA was identified statistically more frequently by WES or WGS, while more focal-scale CNAs were detected by WGS than by WES. Conclusions: Our results suggest that NGS can replace microarrays to detect CNA in EA. WGS is superior to WES in that it can offer finer resolution for the detection, though if the interest is on recurrent CNAs, WES can be preferable to WGS for its cost-effectiveness. © 2015 Wang et al.


Liu S.,Henan Office for Cancer Research and Control | Dai J.Y.,Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center | Yao L.,Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center | Li X.,Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center | And 8 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2014

Incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has increased sharply in Western Europe and United States over the past three decades. Nearly all cases of EAC in the west are thought to be associated with Barrett's esophagus (BE) at the time of diagnosis. Regions in the Henan province of China have one of world's highest incidences of esophageal cancer, yet recent temporal trends in the relative rates of EAC with respect to esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma (ESCC), as well as its association with Barrett's esophagus (BE), have not been reported. In this report, we present large-scale longitudinal clinical and histological data on 5401 esophageal cancers (EC) patients diagnosed during the recent 10-year period (2002-2011) at Henan Cancer Hospital, China. All 217 esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) patients from these 5401 EC patients were examined to better understand the relationship between Barrett's esophagus (BE) and EAC. We found that EAC was relatively rare and accounted for approximately 5% of all esophageal cancers each year during 2002-2011. There is no evidence of significant temporal trends in the rate of EAC relative to ESCC. Only 10 out of 217 (4.6%) EAC cases were detected to have any evidence of Barrett's esophagus. This result raises the possibility of a different etiological basis for EAC in China motivating more detailed epidemiological, clinical and molecular characterization of EAC in China in order to better understand the neoplastic development of EAC. Copyright: © 2014 Liu et al.

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